Unpopular views about music -

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Hazel Motes

"I can smell the sin on your breath"
kiwifarms.net
I don't know if it was because I was drunk or not, but I really enjoyed listening to U2's War last night. I hate everything else by them.
 

Night.Raider

kiwifarms.net
Personally I think flamenco & other nylon guitar genres outrank the likes of Metal, rock, & material played mainly with steel string acoustic & electric guitars. I'm not sure if I know how to put it yet, but they feel as though they're more demanding as well as rewarding.
 

Idiot Asshole

kiwifarms.net
Nu Metal doesn't deserve the shit it gets today.
There are awful bands/songs with alot of teen angst, sure, but I enjoy some older Linkin Park or Limp Bizkit songs from time to time.
I'll give nu metal this, there are actually a few decent songs and even albums scattered around in the genre, which gives it a leg up over metalcore, deathcore and djent which are all irredeemably lame.
 

Seven Costanza

kiwifarms.net
Nu metal is a shit genre, but if I had to be "positive" for a sec I'd say that Korn's first two albums are almost good. They both contain too many filler tracks but if you took the "real" tracks from each album you could craft one decent, coherent hour-long experience experience. Also, I always found their guitar and bass tones to be really interesting and their drummer was excellent.

Speaking as an oldfag here, I love metalcore up through 2005 or so (totally unfamiliar with it in the modern context). I like the early "literal" metalcore (hardcore/metal hybrid shit), the tough guy mosh shit, and the goofy "emotional" shit from Ferret, Tribunal, Eulogy, etc. Fun times!!
 

Precocious Halfwit

I am your man Christmas parsnet
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Nu metal is a shit genre, but if I had to be "positive" for a sec I'd say that Korn's first two albums are almost good. They both contain too many filler tracks but if you took the "real" tracks from each album you could craft one decent, coherent hour-long experience experience. Also, I always found their guitar and bass tones to be really interesting and their drummer was excellent.

Speaking as an oldfag here, I love metalcore up through 2005 or so (totally unfamiliar with it in the modern context). I like the early "literal" metalcore (hardcore/metal hybrid shit), the tough guy mosh shit, and the goofy "emotional" shit from Ferret, Tribunal, Eulogy, etc. Fun times!!
Don't forget Trustkill! I think they managed to span the whole hardcore spectrum from the lighter emo stuff like Armsbendback to the mosh stuff like Throwdown and the literal metalcore stuff like Walls Of Jericho etc. Fantastic stuff!

Back on subject, my most unpopular view on music apparently isn't that controversial because it seems to have cropped up in this thread once or twice, but it gets me disproportionate stick in real life: I do not rate Johnny Cash's cover of Hurt. The NIN version is so much more fragile (scuse the pun).
 
Nu metal is a shit genre, but if I had to be "positive" for a sec I'd say that Korn's first two albums are almost good. They both contain too many filler tracks but if you took the "real" tracks from each album you could craft one decent, coherent hour-long experience experience. Also, I always found their guitar and bass tones to be really interesting and their drummer was excellent.

Speaking as an oldfag here, I love metalcore up through 2005 or so (totally unfamiliar with it in the modern context). I like the early "literal" metalcore (hardcore/metal hybrid shit), the tough guy mosh shit, and the goofy "emotional" shit from Ferret, Tribunal, Eulogy, etc. Fun times!!
I absolutely loved their first album as a young teen. Life is Peachy? Meh. Follow the Leader? Some great hits that still hold up well, but overall a disappointing album in terms of style. Issues? D+. And after that I stopped listening to them all together, in fact forget they're still around.

But anyway, their debut album has a lot of solid, aggressive alternative metal tunes that I still enjoy after all these years.
 

Cardenio

*YAWN*
True & Honest Fan
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If you enjoy a wide arrange of music and yet haven't fallen into the audiophile hobby of buying decent headphones I urge you not to.

I'm not even a true snob when it comes to audiophile equipment. I've never spent more than $400 on good headphones or speakers. To most people who are considered audiophiles (like the nerd below) the stuff I've bought is straight up budget hardware. Also I think people who believe Flac & Vinyl are of such higher quality than normal digital formats are full of shit. Frankly I think if you believe such loseless formats make a big difference you're being fooled by the placebo effect.


But anyway when I put on my current headphones and try a new album the music usually just sounds flat to me. Hopefully someone knows the real answer but I believe what happened was in the mid 1960s the switch from Mono to Stereo was made. Record studios put the money for the new fancy equipment and for 15 years producers, engineers, and artists made some of the best albums when it comes to production.

Something happened in the 80s. Maybe it was the rise of New Wave and Metal where the focus was just sounding as loud as possible. Maybe the industry realized that most audiences were enjoying music with bad equipment. But the effect was permanent, unless a band really cared about the production most pop music has very lackluster production work. I love Hip Hop & Rap but damn most of the genre comes off so flat to me.

So now when I want to enjoy an album I have two qualities I pay attention to me. Like everyone else I need it to be music that I like of course. But I also now want the music to be of good production, I want that dynamic use of stereo.

If you don't get what I'm talking about then stick with the crappiest audio equipment. Otherwise you could end up like me and only have some 40 albums in rotation. Why limit your enjoyment of music?

On that note "lo-fi" is one of the stupidest genres of music. It's beyond me why an artist would intentionally make their work sound like it was made on a low budget.
 

Positron

Ran, Bob Ran!
True & Honest Fan
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If you don't get what I'm talking about then stick with the crappiest audio equipment. Otherwise you could end up like me and only have some 40 albums in rotation. Why limit your enjoyment of music?
People love to laugh at audiophiles who plays his whole collection of 20 vinyl records on $100000 equipment, but as long as he feels good I don't quite see what the problem is. We don't pick on people who recite the same rosary day after day, so why should we laugh at those who listen to the same music? "Expanding your horizon" is good but it isn't the only good.

If you enjoy a wide arrange of music and yet haven't fallen into the audiophile hobby of buying decent headphones I urge you not to.
The trick is to be sane and be balanced, no matter what your budget is, be content with what you have. Audiophile neurosis -- the nagging feeling that your rig is not nearly good enough -- takes the joy off listening. And I might add my contentious take: if you have a lot of music, investing in quality rig can make a lot of financial sense. Suppose you have 2000 records or CDs, spending $1000 on audio upgrades would just mean paying an extra $0.5 on each record. Of course you can use that $1000 on even more music, but being able to enjoy the improved playback of the music you already own -- music that you're familar with, perhaps already grown to love -- is a different kind of pleasure from getting acquainted with new music.

Hopefully someone knows the real answer but I believe what happened was in the mid 1960s the switch from Mono to Stereo was made. Record studios put the money for the new fancy equipment and for 15 years producers, engineers, and artists made some of the best albums when it comes to production.
I think the answer was the artistry of the engineers at that time. There was no college course on audio engineering back then, and each engineer had their own tricks. The best ones became legendary, and unfortunately their artistry wasn't easily passed along. The luscious early RCA stereo of the late 50-60s pleasures the ears in a quite different manner from today's high-res clarity.
 

Cardenio

*YAWN*
True & Honest Fan
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People love to laugh at audiophiles who plays his whole collection of 20 vinyl records on $100000 equipment, but as long as he feels good I don't quite see what the problem is. We don't pick on people who recite the same rosary day after day, so why should we laugh at those who listen to the same music? "Expanding your horizon" is good but it isn't the only good.


The trick is to be sane and be balanced, no matter what your budget is, be content with what you have. Audiophile neurosis -- the nagging feeling that your rig is not nearly good enough -- takes the joy off listening. And I might add my contentious take: if you have a lot of music, investing in quality rig can make a lot of financial sense. Suppose you have 2000 records or CDs, spending $1000 on audio upgrades would just mean paying an extra $0.5 on each record. Of course you can use that $1000 on even more music, but being able to enjoy the improved playback of the music you already own -- music that you're familar with, perhaps already grown to love -- is a different kind of pleasure from getting acquainted with new music.


I think the answer was the artistry of the engineers at that time. There was no college course on audio engineering back then, and each engineer had their own tricks. The best ones became legendary, and unfortunately their artistry wasn't easily passed along. The luscious early RCA stereo of the late 50-60s pleasures the ears in a quite different manner from today's high-res clarity.
Fantastic post, very thought provoking.

I don't know it'll never not be amusing to me to watch that guy have what appears to be a religious epiphany from very high end headphones. I think he's a little crazy, perhaps I'm jealous since I can't imagine having such a joyous emotional response. Whatever.

I ttotally agree if you value your entertainment so greatly you should by all means invest in quality electronics to immerse yourself. The high end enthusiasts by spending so much on this products helps corporations who then hire engineers to innovate and improve technology. If we didn't have these people who seek such quality I'm not too sure if we'd have our current gen affordable electronics that are leaps and bounds ahead of what was sold a decade ago.

And you have a point that it really was the producers. There's good reason why Quincy Jones is a commonly known name among the public.
 

SkaTastic

The Boy's A Time Bomb
kiwifarms.net
RATM is overrated.
Money by Pink Floyd is probably one of the weakest tracks on the album (not that it isn't still a decent song)
Animals isn't underrated
 
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Slimboy Fat

Check out my new weapon
True & Honest Fan
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If you enjoy a wide arrange of music and yet haven't fallen into the audiophile hobby of buying decent headphones I urge you not to.

I'm not even a true snob when it comes to audiophile equipment. I've never spent more than $400 on good headphones or speakers. To most people who are considered audiophiles (like the nerd below) the stuff I've bought is straight up budget hardware. Also I think people who believe Flac & Vinyl are of such higher quality than normal digital formats are full of shit. Frankly I think if you believe such loseless formats make a big difference you're being fooled by the placebo effect.


But anyway when I put on my current headphones and try a new album the music usually just sounds flat to me. Hopefully someone knows the real answer but I believe what happened was in the mid 1960s the switch from Mono to Stereo was made. Record studios put the money for the new fancy equipment and for 15 years producers, engineers, and artists made some of the best albums when it comes to production.

Something happened in the 80s. Maybe it was the rise of New Wave and Metal where the focus was just sounding as loud as possible. Maybe the industry realized that most audiences were enjoying music with bad equipment. But the effect was permanent, unless a band really cared about the production most pop music has very lackluster production work. I love Hip Hop & Rap but damn most of the genre comes off so flat to me.

So now when I want to enjoy an album I have two qualities I pay attention to me. Like everyone else I need it to be music that I like of course. But I also now want the music to be of good production, I want that dynamic use of stereo.

If you don't get what I'm talking about then stick with the crappiest audio equipment. Otherwise you could end up like me and only have some 40 albums in rotation. Why limit your enjoyment of music?

On that note "lo-fi" is one of the stupidest genres of music. It's beyond me why an artist would intentionally make their work sound like it was made on a low budget.
The loudness wars ruined commercial production, and the smartphone's cheap earbuds have rendered any production quality irrelevant. Even worse, things have to sound good on the shitty phone speaker otherwise there will be no commercial success. Active listening has become a hobbyist venture and there's an ocean of groups that cater to that both in composition and production quality but unless you're into that, anything you buy for audio is good enough. (Also if someone claims they can pass a FLAC vs CBR320 double blind they're likely full of shit)

THAT BEING SAID, if you are either a musician, or an active listening hobbyist type, there is absolutely a massive difference between lower end and high end. You do reach a diminishing returns threshold of not worth it eventually, but when you've listened to an album hundreds of times, upgrade your system and hear tones and sounds you've never noticed before, it's really quite the magical experience.

I don't know what "audiophile" entails in this context, but over the last decade I've gone from taped up skullcandy cans to a good, budget studio-level loudspeaker system and honestly, it's been worth it every upgrade up until now, and I don't think I'll be hitting that "not worth it anymore" point for another couple thousand dollars. Obviously I consume and create enough music to warrant my purchases, but I think a lot of people could benefit from throwing a little money into some audio. Everyone has a "good enough" point and I'd say 400 is a pretty solid limit for anyone that don't consider themselves a hobbyist, but the quality shit is absolutely worth it either way.

Protip: if you're spending more than 500 on cans that you use at home, you should not be buying cans for home use, you should be buying speakers.
 

Orange Rhymer

kiwifarms.net
If you enjoy a wide arrange of music and yet haven't fallen into the audiophile hobby of buying decent headphones I urge you not to.

I'm not even a true snob when it comes to audiophile equipment. I've never spent more than $400 on good headphones or speakers. To most people who are considered audiophiles (like the nerd below) the stuff I've bought is straight up budget hardware. Also I think people who believe Flac & Vinyl are of such higher quality than normal digital formats are full of shit. Frankly I think if you believe such loseless formats make a big difference you're being fooled by the placebo effect.


But anyway when I put on my current headphones and try a new album the music usually just sounds flat to me. Hopefully someone knows the real answer but I believe what happened was in the mid 1960s the switch from Mono to Stereo was made. Record studios put the money for the new fancy equipment and for 15 years producers, engineers, and artists made some of the best albums when it comes to production.

Something happened in the 80s. Maybe it was the rise of New Wave and Metal where the focus was just sounding as loud as possible. Maybe the industry realized that most audiences were enjoying music with bad equipment. But the effect was permanent, unless a band really cared about the production most pop music has very lackluster production work. I love Hip Hop & Rap but damn most of the genre comes off so flat to me.

So now when I want to enjoy an album I have two qualities I pay attention to me. Like everyone else I need it to be music that I like of course. But I also now want the music to be of good production, I want that dynamic use of stereo.

If you don't get what I'm talking about then stick with the crappiest audio equipment. Otherwise you could end up like me and only have some 40 albums in rotation. Why limit your enjoyment of music?

On that note "lo-fi" is one of the stupidest genres of music. It's beyond me why an artist would intentionally make their work sound like it was made on a low budget.
Agree completely.
BTW: I have a vacuum drum of liquid nitrogen, and I am giving equipment baptisms for $300 per.
How many slots can I reserve for you?
God bless the audiophile.

I had a buddy that wired up $40 Radio Shack (Fisher?) speakers with old coathanger wire, while playing a refurb Discman through them.
Shit sounded GREAT.
 

Damien Thorne

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I actually like most of the music Kansas put out in the ‘70s, although I will agree everything they did in the ‘80s and after was crap. They were my first prog rock band.
 
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