Valve puts "Steam Link Anywhere" into a beta build of Steam. - Suspiciously not long after the Google Staida announcement.

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Tanner Glass

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Valve is facing more competition than ever in the PC gaming market as companies like Twitch, Discord, and Epic Games introduce their own stores to compete with Steam. PCGamer reported earlier this weekthat Valve has turned to new features like Steam Link Anywhere and the largely open source Steam Networking Sockets APIs to help make sure its platform will remain popular with gamers and developers alike.
Steam Link Anywhere seems to do what it says on the tin. In the Steam Link beta build released on March 14, the only change was listed as "Added support for Steam Link Anywhere, now in early beta." Valve explained that "Steam Link Anywhere allows you to stream games to your Steam Link from any computer running Steam, as long as your computer has good upload speed and your Steam Link device has a good network connection."

This is just the latest iteration of Steam Link. Valve introduced the technology with dedicated hardware in November 2015, and following numerous price cuts; itdiscontinued that hardware in November 2018. In the meantime, the company released a Steam Link app for Android (and eventually iOS) that let people access their Steam libraries on their phones. The app's also available for Samsung smart TVs and Raspberry Pi 3 devices.
The current version of Steam Link is limited to home networks. Steam Link Anywhere appears to remove that limitation, provided the host computer's upload speeds and the target device's download speeds can support game streaming. That's a significant improvement to Steam Link that could make it even more popular with people who want to be able to access their Steam libraries no matter where they happen to be.
PCGamer also spotted new Steam Networking Sockets APIs. These APIs would allow developers to use Valve's networking technology, which is used in massively popular titles like Counter-Strike: Global Offensive and Dota 2, in their own games. Valve has reportedly said that "a large portion" of the API is now open source--which lets developers poke around to see exactly how it works--and can offer "faster and more secure connections."
This is the kind of development that many players won't think about, because networking really only comes to most people's attention when there's a problem with it, but could make things significantly easier for developers. Valve is set to explain the advantages of using its Steam Networking Sockets APIs over other multiplayer technologies at GDC 2019 on March 21.

TL;DR - Steam is working on and has nearly figured out game streaming that uses your own PC and existing games library. They likely will be able to beat Google Stadia to market and start off with a much larger footprint. Although some of the wording is vague ("a good internet connection") it's available to mess with as of last week.
 

Luigi

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I used it and for LAN it worked fine. I could even use it to play other stuff on my pc from my phone.

I still don't think we can play over the internet before we achieve FTL technology. 180ms is unplayable for anything that requires skill, but it probably works fine if you are into RPGs and VNs.
 

Tanner Glass

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I used it for LAN and it worked mostly fine, I just liked that it was timed near the Google Stadia announcement.

Assuming they're both similar (although I imagine Steam Link will perform a bit bitter for me as I'm never that far from home) I'd prefer to have access to my steam library.
 
J

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But steam link is garbage, adding the extra latency of going through the internet is not going to make it any less garbage.
Steam Link can work pretty well if you have an ideal network. A fast, expensive router and minimum congestion, with everything either wired or connected over the 5ghz band with very little between your computer and the router.

So yeah, it's going to be shit for most people. Hope you have symmetrical fiber internet fgts
 

Clop

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"Steam Link Anywhere allows you to stream games to your Steam Link from any computer running Steam, as long as your computer has good upload speed and your Steam Link device has a good network connection."
So why not just sign in on that computer and use the good network connection to download the game and play it right there without any issues?

Every time I see or hear the Steam Link I keep asking: Why does anyone need this? There are zero situations where you need to play your games at someone else's PC RIGHT NOW without any delay (except the fucking latency.)
 

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I wasted my money buying a Steam link when it was on sale. Kinda cool you can stream your whole computer if you've got Steam open, but the novelty wears off fast.

It fits a very specific need that's easily solved in most cases by getting a really long HDMI cord. Unless the layout of your house is shit and you want to stream Nekopara from your computer in the attic to the 12' plasma in the basement, there's not much reason to get one.
 
J

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I wasted my money buying a Steam link when it was on sale. Kinda cool you can stream your whole computer if you've got Steam open, but the novelty wears off fast.

It fits a very specific need that's easily solved in most cases by getting a really long HDMI cord. Unless the layout of your house is shit and you want to stream Nekopara from your computer in the attic to the 12' plasma in the basement, there's not much reason to get one.

That's pretty much my situation but it still had me running up and down stairs every time there was a fuckup and something made it so I needed to go click one fucking retarded thing on my desktop. Some games just flat out don't work right, or might work with an error message, and then you have to go click off a dialog box and it basically softlocks your Steam Link.

So if that happens and you're on vacation, sorry, your computer's just gonna sit there and act retarded until you get back. And there's no way within Steam to force a reboot.

They should really implement a voting mechanism in Steam for Link users to vote on whether or not the game works, and then give you a warning if the votes have more than a 50% negative rating
 

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The big problem with steam link isn't the streaming technology, it was the reliability of using a regular PC OS/games.

Modern internet connections have improved to the point where you could probably do this without latency over the internet - home internet connections in US are becoming routinely 100mb+, and the adoption of 5g is going to make it so phones will be able to get download speeds roughly in that area, so the infrastructure for steam link working over the internet is present.

Fault -recovery is a bitch though - if you're at an ordinary PC and something fucks up with a game, it's real easy to just control-alt-delete and fix it - if something goes wrong with steam link though, you might have to RDP to fix everything. Windows 10 also has all sorts of exceptional bugs (if you have a PC with windows 10, and don't have a mouse hooked to a port, you won't be able see the cursor, for instance) - this is a consequence of Microsoft deciding around Windows Vista time frame that having software testers wasn't "agile." Alternatively you could just use linux ha ha ha what a funny joke I crack myself up. The point is that the dream of playing pc games from a phone isn't going to work very well if you have to fuck around with rdp as much as you do right now to get the shit to work.
 

DragoonSierra

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I used it for LAN and it worked mostly fine, I just liked that it was timed near the Google Stadia announcement.

Assuming they're both similar (although I imagine Steam Link will perform a bit bitter for me as I'm never that far from home) I'd prefer to have access to my steam library.
A good trick is if youve got any extra equipment from your previous service or an old router with WiFi using a wired connection you can turn it into a hub at the other end of the house.
 

Tanner Glass

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Every time I see or hear the Steam Link I keep asking: Why does anyone need this? There are zero situations where you need to play your games at someone else's PC RIGHT NOW without any delay (except the fucking latency.)

It's mainly a convience thing.

Let's say hypothetically you live in a house and have a rad gaming PC in your game room/home office/whatever. You play all your shit on steam there but if you wanted to play in your bedroom you would have to lug that PC from your office to the bedroom to do so.

Instead of doing that, a steam link (or other stream device/service) let's you access that PC from basically anywhere in the house via an older PC, TV App, or special device (also called a "steam link"). It's pretty handy if you find yourself with that problem. Otherwise, it's just a $5 thing people bought when they were put on clearance just to fuck around with.

Although it's neat, I really think game streaming is over-hyped because even if advances in game technology make it so you could theoretically play anywhere - most people will always have a preferred place and time to do so. I think most "PC Gamers" have a PC setup just the way they like it and most console gamers have a living room setup the way they like and the idea of playing elsewhere, while neat, is still limited by that.
 

Clop

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It's mainly a convience thing.

Let's say hypothetically you live in a house and have a rad gaming PC in your game room/home office/whatever. You play all your shit on steam there but if you wanted to play in your bedroom you would have to lug that PC from your office to the bedroom to do so.

Instead of doing that, a steam link (or other stream device/service) let's you access that PC from basically anywhere in the house via an older PC, TV App, or special device (also called a "steam link"). It's pretty handy if you find yourself with that problem. Otherwise, it's just a $5 thing people bought when they were put on clearance just to fuck around with.

Although it's neat, I really think game streaming is over-hyped because even if advances in game technology make it so you could theoretically play anywhere - most people will always have a preferred place and time to do so. I think most "PC Gamers" have a PC setup just the way they like it and most console gamers have a living room setup the way they like and the idea of playing elsewhere, while neat, is still limited by that.
I get where you're coming from with that hypothesis but "playing in your bedroom" sounds to me like "eating in the bathroom."

There's a reason why the most passionate PC gamers call their spots "stations" and "rigs" and "setups." Playing elsewhere has plenty of options like handhelds, laptops, etc.
 

Tanner Glass

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I get where you're coming from with that hypothesis but "playing in your bedroom" sounds to me like "eating in the bathroom."

There's a reason why the most passionate PC gamers call their spots "stations" and "rigs" and "setups." Playing elsewhere has plenty of options like handhelds, laptops, etc.

I don't disagree, that's just the main use case for those devices. I agree that most people (PC AND Console) have their setups and even if you can move the game to a different room (via steam link) or different location (via google Stadia), it doesn't move your big TV, your comfy couch, or your surround sound system. It's always going be a slightly inferior experience.
 

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But steam link is garbage, adding the extra latency of going through the internet is not going to make it any less garbage.
From my house to any other house that uses the same ISP that I'm using I got around 2~5ms of latency (on the network-side), this is very playable using parsec and IMHO steam link is better than parsec for latency