Western Animation -

Trilby

Sorry, but not sorry!
True & Honest Fan
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Animated short from 1990 by the guy who made Night At The Museum (Children's book on which the Ben Stiller movie was based)


Love the sound design in this
Oooh a Zagreb Film alumni! Those guys are always cool!
 

Private Pyle

Be gay, do crimes.
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Admittedly all that's true, but I wonder if we'll get to see the people who complained about the "wussification of Popeye" 6 years ago do it again.
Given the state of reboots in past 6 years, there’s a good chance people will go “Y’know, maybe we were too harsh before. It could have been way worse.”
 

Commander X

kiwifarms.net
Was looking over Toonstruck, a 1996 point-and-click adventure game, featuring hand-drawn cartoon characters interacting with the video captured live-action likeness of Christopher Lloyd; he plays the disgruntled chief animator behind a popular kids' show about a cast of overly cutesy fluffy bunnies, being forced by his boss Ben Stein to create even more saccharine bunny characters for the show he falls asleep and wakes up to eventually find himself entering his TV into the world of his show.

An interesting premise but the execution is lacking; it is far too 1990s with the wonky backgrounds, candy coated barf color palette, and obnoxious voice actors telling 80 year old jokes sprinkled with "adult references." Complete with animated sequences produced by Nelvana with their catalog of watered down American cartoon character cliches.
EIYyIcfW4AAhpdD.png

EIYyIceWsAEloRi.jpg
 

Steamboat_Bill

Going to beat the record of the Robert E. Lee
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Was looking over Toonstruck, a 1996 point-and-click adventure game, featuring hand-drawn cartoon characters interacting with the video captured live-action likeness of Christopher Lloyd; he plays the disgruntled chief animator behind a popular kids' show about a cast of overly cutesy fluffy bunnies, being forced by his boss Ben Stein to create even more saccharine bunny characters for the show he falls asleep and wakes up to eventually find himself entering his TV into the world of his show.

An interesting premise but the execution is lacking; it is far too 1990s with the wonky backgrounds, candy coated barf color palette, and obnoxious voice actors telling 80 year old jokes sprinkled with "adult references." Complete with animated sequences produced by Nelvana with their catalog of watered down American cartoon character cliches.View attachment 1294541
View attachment 1294543
With the level of talent in this game, I doubt the voice work is that obnoxious...
 

Sayon

kiwifarms.net
Man, looking over Hey Arnold and Doug again made me realize two things again maybe:

1. Hey Arnold was really at its best when the show was about how weird the town is and how weird Arnold was especially. The show really lost something when it transitioned all the way into "Arnold is more or less Jesus who helps everyone else's problems."

2. Doug's creator should've had the chance to do the spinoff for Judy Funnie he wanted to do. She was always much more charismatic and just better all around than Doug. Frankly, Doug was always the worst character in his own show.
 

NNewt84

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I still remember how much salt generated from the Spider-Verse and Voltron fandom when it turned out that the showrunners from Legendary Defender were in charge of the sequel and spin offs. It got to they point that they were legitimately expecting Spider-Verse 2 to be this racist/sexist fest and swearing off the franchise.
What I don't get is why everyone, both SJWs and anti-SJWs, has this unhealthy obsession with lumping women and black people together as if they're one cohesive group. Like... women aren't a minority; they make up 51% of the population. So if anything, shouldn't men be considered the "minority" gender that's basically like black people?

And to tie it back to this topic of this thread, here's a Western-animated show that did exactly that, by having a white female protagonist with a token black friend and a token male friend:

Hilda_TV_Series-959973894-large.jpg
 

The Pink Panther

Looking At Your Stag Reel
True & Honest Fan
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So I finally got around to watching Scoob.
Can I just say that I’ve never seen a movie embody every bad movie cliche from the past decade. It’s almost impressive.
Someone on /co/ warned us ALL back in October when they saw at an early viewing and they were 95% spot-on AND WE DIDN'T CHOOSE TO BELIEVE 'EM:

b03ad2_7391112.png

I was actually there for that thread...
 

Mr. 0

god im not good at computer how did this get here
True & Honest Fan
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Someone on /co/ warned us ALL back in October when they saw at an early viewing and they were 95% spot-on AND WE DIDN'T CHOOSE TO BELIEVE 'EM:


I was actually there for that thread...
Wasn't this the movie they said they were planning to kick off the "Hanna-Barbera Cinematic Universe" with years ago?
 
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Rinny.

a fhakin rat
kiwifarms.net
What I don't get is why everyone, both SJWs and anti-SJWs, has this unhealthy obsession with lumping women and black people together as if they're one cohesive group. Like... women aren't a minority; they make up 51% of the population. So if anything, shouldn't men be considered the "minority" gender that's basically like black people?

And to tie it back to this topic of this thread, here's a Western-animated show that did exactly that, by having a white female protagonist with a token black friend and a token male friend:

View attachment 1305070
I think there's EASILY worse examples you could've pulled up regarding SJWish shows because Hilda is pretty tame on that regard- their identity isn't even really the focus of the show at all and I wouldn't say having a female protagonist and/or black side character makes it pandering right off the bat.

But since you brought up Hilda, I just want to say I've tried watching this show twice and I can't fucking go through it because it's so boring.
I have no clue why I struggle to watch it. I don't know if this is my fault (preferences/taste/etc) or the show's. I can't say I have this issue usually because even if it's not my cup of tea (Like Kipo) I'll still try to watch it but Hilda just doesn't get me engaged for some stupid reason.
Supposedly it's based on a graphic novel series, I might try to look into that instead because maybe itll be better than the Netflix series but i don't know.
 

NNewt84

kiwifarms.net
I think there's EASILY worse examples you could've pulled up regarding SJWish shows because Hilda is pretty tame on that regard- their identity isn't even really the focus of the show at all and I wouldn't say having a female protagonist and/or black side character makes it pandering right off the bat.
Oh my God... I'm saying this show isn't SJW-pandering bait. I'm saying this an anti-SJW show because the protagonist is white and female, instead of white and male or non-white and female. Meanwhile, she has a token black friend and a token male friend. In other words, instead of using the "straight white male"/"women and minorities" dichotomy, this show does the opposite - i.e. "straight white female"/"men and minorities", making women the majority and men the minority. And I was praising the show for going against the flow.

So yeah... way to completely miss the point of my post. I even started it off by saying,

What I don't get is why everyone, both SJWs and anti-SJWs, has this unhealthy obsession with lumping women and black people together as if they're one cohesive group. Like... women aren't a minority; they make up 51% of the population. So if anything, shouldn't men be considered the "minority" gender that's basically like black people?
So how did you not realise that I was saying we should, you know, try to separate women from black people? And I was using this show as an example of how to do that, because the show puts girls on a higher plane than black people, instead of on par with them, treating girls as "normal" and blacks as "not normal", and making boys the "minority" gender that's equivalent to black people.

I really don't get why it's such a difficult concept for people to grasp that women are not a minority, especially when women actually have less rights in non-white nations.

And yeah, way to also prove my initial point by showing that you yourself think women and blacks are interconnected and can never be separated.
 
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Rinny.

a fhakin rat
kiwifarms.net
Oh my God... I'm saying this show isn't SJW-pandering bait. I'm saying this an anti-SJW show because the protagonist is white and female, instead of white and male or non-white and female. Meanwhile, she has a token black friend and a token male friend. In other words, instead of using the "straight white male"/"women and minorities" dichotomy, this show does the opposite, by making women the majority and men the minority. And I was praising the show for going against the flow.

So yeah... way to completely miss the point of my post.
Your writing is confusing, no offense.
"What I don't get is why everyone, both SJWs and anti-SJWs, has this unhealthy obsession with lumping women and black people together as if they're one cohesive group. "

So now it's cool that its "anti-sjw" despite complaining it's unhealthy of them to lump women and black people together by putting in the front rather than the back of the cast

I'm not sure if having a white female protag makes something "anti-sjw" at all, I'm not sure where you get this conception /definition from.
 

NNewt84

kiwifarms.net
So now it's cool that its "anti-sjw" despite complaining it's unhealthy of them to lump women and black people together by putting in the front rather than the back of the cast
My point is that women are not a minority - they make up 51% of the population - so we shouldn't treat them like black people. Just write female characters as normal characters, and keep the black characters as mere tokens.

There's also the fact that women can be racist against black people, and black people can be sexist against women. Hell, if anything, women actually have less rights in non-white countries. If you go to places like Nigeria, the DRC, Saudi Arabia, China, Papua New Guinea... yeah, women don't exactly have it good there. Yet they have a shit-tonne of rights - arguably more than men - in countries like Canada, the USA, Australia, etc.. If that doesn't prove that women and black people aren't the same thing, I don't know what does.

And once again, I never complained that Hilda "lumped women and blacks together" - I praised them for not doing that, and instead for lumping men and black people together by making them the diversity tokens to the white female protagonist. When I said it "did exactly that", I was referring to my last statement where I asked, "Wouldn't it make more sense to lump men and black people together?" The show puts whites and females at the front, and blacks and males at the back.

Or, to break this down more simply:

On the show Hilda:

white + female = normal
black = not normal
male = also not normal

After all, if you're born as a girl and you grow up as a girl, then being a girl is just the "default" gender to you, right?

If you seriously thought Hilda "put women and blacks at the front", then I have to ask: did we even watch the same show? Or even look at the same poster? The poster clearly shows a lily-white girl standing in the foreground, with a black kid and a boy standing behind her. As if to say, "Look kids! Look at this mighty-whitey female person! She's not like those minority groups!" Yeah yeah, I know that's far from the point of the poster, but there's no way anyone would look at it and take away that girls are some lowly minority group either. They would see there's a token black character, and unless they're already aware of the intersectional SJW mindset to begin with - which I hope the show's target audience isn't - then they won't think that character being black is in any way similar to the main character being a girl.

I'm not sure if having a white female protag makes something "anti-sjw" at all, I'm not sure where you get this conception /definition from.
Well, that combined with having a token black friend shows that the show doesn't consider women a minority like black people, since it's showing a black character as being subservient to a white girl. That's the point I was getting at here, that the creator, Luke Pearson, did not let himself get suckered in to the SJW mindset that women are just some lowly minority class, and instead he realises that women are just normal human beings like you and me, and he writes them as such. He didn't create Hilda to pander to SJWs; he just made the main character a girl because he wanted to. Plain and simple.

Contrary to popular belief, you can separate women from black people. Just look at the Peanuts comics, for example - there's a shit-tonne of female characters, yet not a single black character (aside from the 2015 animated film). That's as far away from black people as female characters can get. And yet people still think women are a "minority" in 2020, because they think logic is for exceptionals.

Just because something has a female protagonist, that does not mean it's pandering to SJWs, or using girls as a diversity token. I really don't get why it's so hard for people to understand this. You can write a female character without treating her gender like it's equivalent to being black or LGBT. Women are just regular human beings, so why can't they be treated as such?
 
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Private Pyle

Be gay, do crimes.
kiwifarms.net
Wasn't this the movie they said they were planning to kick off the "Hanna-Barbera Cinematic Universe" with years ago?
The sad part? This is Warner Bros‘ fourth attempt at a shared cinematic universe (sixth if you count WB trying to expand HP and LotR with prequels) and second animated attempt after the LEGO movies fizzled out.
But who knows, maybe this will be their lucky break...
Yes.

But I don't think it's going to happen. This movie got mixed critical reception and it looks kinda shit.
...But statistics aren’t in their favor.
 
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cartoons