What are some good non-fiction books? - i wanna' be (((woke)))

OhGoy

shit demon
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Gaming isn't the best way of learning things (for obvious reasons), so I've recently decided that I need a more constructive hobby, like reading. The problem, though, is that I don't know where to start. I'd prefer something philosophical and/or political. I recently finished "The Prince" by Machiavelli and thought it was a decent read, so that might give you an idea of what I'm looking for.
 
K

KM 749

Guest
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Start with the Greeks.

More specifically, start with Plato's Republic, Aristotle's Politics and Nicomachean Ethics. Many political books will refer or allude to the concepts taught in these books. I'd also recommend reading Homer's Iliad, Homer's Odyssey, Herodotus' Histories, Hesiod's poetry, Sophocles' Oedipus trilogy, and Aristophanes' works, not only because they are great works, but also because literary authors and thinkers will constantly allude to the events told in each of these works, so it will help to know them.
 
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AtrocityVoyeur

Menschliches, Allzumenschliches
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Not trying to say I agree with everything in these books. But they are short and interesting.

Jonathan Haidt- The Righteous Mind
Tocqueville- Democracy in America
Montaigne- Essays and Collected Writing
Freud- Civilization and its Discontents
 

Polish Hot Dog (spicie)

jestem najlepsza
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Start with the Greeks.

More specifically, start with Plato's Republic, Aristotle's Politics and Nicomachean Ethics. Many political books will refer or allude to the concepts taught in these books.
How dare you suggest the greeks before me.
For morals and humans, I think Soren Kierkegaard and Fyodor Dostoyevsky (man that's annoying to spell correctly) have good works.

Don't take my word for it, i'm just a chucklefuck on the internet
 
K

KM 749

Guest
kiwifarms.net
If you want to limit the amount of anger you feel at events in the world (or on the Farms) and to take everything more cooly and logically, then I would recommend reading some Stoic works. Out of the trio of Seneca's Moral Epistles, Marcus Aurelius' Meditations, and Epictetus' Enchiridion, my personal favorite would be the former because of its wide range of topics it covers and everyday applicability of its lessons. Each section is like a short essay that covers a specific topic while helping to construct a larger philosophy towards the world.

I would also recommend Plutarch's Moralia if you want a book with a similar layout.

Lastly, H.L. Mencken's works are very insightful and clever essays and columns about the absurdities and idiocies of his day, many of which strikingly apply to today. I would recommend his first and second Chrestomathies, as well as his Minority report book.
 

Never Go Full Greer

Mocker of Paralegal Dwarves
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You can't understand the world without understanding economics. There are a number of good introductory options, though the two best are "Basic Economics" by Thomas Sowell and "Economics in One Lesson" by Henry Hazlitt.
 

NomiMalone

dazzling; exciting; very, very sexy
True & Honest Fan
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Gödel, Escher, Bach: An Eternal Golden Braid by Douglas R. Hofstadter. Granted, it's written by someone in the field of artificial intelligence, and can therefore get a bit dense, but it's good for those curious about the ongoing study underlying physical process of consciousness.

If brain-related functions and traumatic brain injury case studies are related to your stated interest in philosophy, I highly recommend anything by Oliver Sacks. Every single one of his books are engrossing and highly descriptive.
 
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