What are some good non-fiction books? - i wanna' be (((woke)))

Pozz Williams

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Radical Chic & Mau-Mauing the Flak Catchers by Tom Wolfe is an oldie but goodie. Wolfe was making fun of protest movements all the way back in the early 70s, and you can probably find the two essays online.
 
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Buster O'Keefe

Enjoys offal
True & Honest Fan
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Exterminate All the Brutes by Sven Lindqvist: Examination of genocide and how European race theory emerged. The title comes from Conrad's Heart of Darkness.
 

Francis E. Dec Esc.

True & Honest Fan
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The Poisoner's Handbook by Deborah Blum. The history of forensic chemistry, and a handbook to how insanely dangerous it was to live in in 1910-30s New York City. Children could die by licking green wallpaper because there was arsenic in the dye, for instance.

A Distant Mirror and The Guns of August by Barbara Tuchman. The former is about 14th century Europe, the latter is about the opening month of WWI.

The Great Influenza by John M. Barry. A history of the 1918 Spanish Flu epidemic, which killed 3-5% of the entire world population, more than World War I.
 

Dracula's Spirit Animal

One time, I accidentally ate a bunch of nails
kiwifarms.net
CAn be found online easily. I recommend to anyone to read Witold's Report by Witold Pilecki. Voluntarily got picked up in a round-up to go to Auschwitz to gather intel on what was happening and attempt an uprising. Was stuck for two and a half years there before finally managing to escape, took part in the Warsaw Uprising, and then resisted the Soviets after the war until he was captured and killed. An incredibly strong and brave man, and probably the most compelling of the Nazi concentration camp memoirs (the few that there are). I'd put it right up there with The Gulag Archipelago for being an important written insight into history.
 

Lydia of Whiterun

Sworn to carry your burdens
kiwifarms.net
I'm definitely going to have to check out the Poisoner's Handbook.

The Embarrassment of Riches: An Interpretation of Dutch Culture in the Golden Age is probably one of my favorite books on this period of Lowlands history. With a focus on everything from music, to scientific achievements, religious attitudes, trade, and law, it's not too dry and is thoroughly engaging. (Simon Schama)

SPQR- A History of Ancient Rome by Mary Beard is probably considered one of the "basic bitch" books of Romaboos everywhere but I really enjoyed it. It doesn't go into the same kind of depth as Gibbon's Decline and Fall (some say this is a must read but much more up to date research is available and, for me, volume one was a slog. I've yet to touch volume two.) but it's an engaging, surface level, tour through the history of Rome.

Danubia: A Personal History of Hapsburg Europe by Simon Winder was my first foray into the Holy Roman Empire with it's art, intrigue, power struggles, political machinations, and way too much fucking incest. It's very surface level but it did lead me to putting Prague on my "Need to absolutely visit" list.

Going Dutch: How England Plundered Holland's Glory by Lisa Jardin. A salty little bitch fest about how England doesn't really deserve a lot of its "culture cred." That's over simplifying things but it was still a fun book. Talks about Dutch contributions to English culture including gardening, loan words, naval technology, etc.

I lost my old Goodreads account or I could give you so many more. I'll need to dig in the old brain bank. Let me know if these aren't your flavor though.
 
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Immortal Technique

©™
kiwifarms.net
I'm gonna necro this thread instead of starting a new one as it follows what I'm looking for in recommendations. I really enjoy reading about unique military experiences that kind of verge on the unbelievable, but are true. Some books I really love if it helps:

- Agent Zig-Zag: A True Story of Nazi Espionage, Love, and Betrayal
- The Terrible Hours: The Greatest Submarine Rescue in History
- Marine!: The Life of Lt. Gen. Lewis B. Puller

What are some military books I'm missing out on?
 

soy_king

I am the Prom King, I seethe at everything
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Pretty much anything by Harold Lamb is pretty good. He expertly combines historical narrative with speculative motivation about historical characters' actions. A pretty good starting dive into historical figures.
 
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Florence

Bim, guess what?
True & Honest Fan
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I'm gonna necro this thread instead of starting a new one as it follows what I'm looking for in recommendations. I really enjoy reading about unique military experiences that kind of verge on the unbelievable, but are true. Some books I really love if it helps:

- Agent Zig-Zag: A True Story of Nazi Espionage, Love, and Betrayal
- The Terrible Hours: The Greatest Submarine Rescue in History
- Marine!: The Life of Lt. Gen. Lewis B. Puller

What are some military books I'm missing out on?
Anything by Ben Macintyre (author of Agent Zigzag) is great, but I’d especially recommend Operation Mincemeat. I’d also suggest books by a chap called Rowland White — they’re generally about feats of British military aviation in conflicts that don’t get much press in the States, so they should be right up your alley.
 
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HonestJohn2376

kiwifarms.net
What I've read over the last few years.

Propaganda: The Formation of Men's Attitudes
Jacques Ellul

All Art is Propaganda (collection of essays)
George Orwell

Dark Ages America: The Final Phase of Empire
Morris Berman

The following Noam Chomsky books:
1. Hegemony or Survival
2. Who Rules the World
3. Failed States

The following Yuval Harari books:
1. Homo Sapiens
2. Homo Deus
3. 21 Lessons for the 21st Century
 
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Wilhelm Bittrich

My pronouns: fuck/off
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For people who are into military history/WW2 history I recommend: The Last Stand Of The Tin Can Sailors by James D. Hornfischer.
Another two reads I can not recommend enough is: Six Frigates: The Epic History of the Founding of the U.S. Navy by Ian W. Toll
and: Give Me a Fast Ship: The Continental Navy and America's Revolution at Sea by Tim McGrath
 

lemmiwinks

кремлеботы
True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
Semi-topical due to recent events:

The Hot Zone - Richard Preston (Wikipedia Synopsis):

The Hot Zone: A Terrifying True Story is a best-selling[1] 1994[2] nonfiction thriller by Richard Preston about the origins and incidents involving viral hemorrhagic fevers, particularly ebolaviruses and marburgviruses. The basis of the book was Preston's 1992 New Yorker article "Crisis in the Hot Zone".[3]

The filoviruses—including Ebola virus, Sudan virus, Marburg virus, and Ravn virus—are Biosafety Level 4 agents, extremely dangerous to humans because they are very infectious, have a high fatality rate, and most have no known prophylactic measures, treatments, or cures.

Along with describing the history of the devastation caused by two of these Central African diseases, Ebola virus disease and Marburg virus disease, Preston described a 1989 incident in which a relative of Ebola virus, named Reston virus, was discovered at a primate quarantine facility in Reston, Virginia, less than 15 miles (24 km) away from Washington, D.C.

Links:
Amazon Link
DRM-Free eBook
 

Troon Draugur

Stilgar of Troon. Facial Fremen-isation surgery
kiwifarms.net
Tao Te Ching - Lao Tzu
The Art of War - Sun Tzu
The Way of Zen - Alan Watts

All of these are not necessarily to be taken verbatim in toto but provide grist for the mill when thinking about approaches and perspectives.
 
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Leonard Helplessness

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Recent events have made me interested in the writings of the founding fathers of the United States. I'm reading through a lot of John Adams and might look to the Federalist Papers next, but I'm interested in anything they wrote with regard to democracy and the prerequisites for one to function successfully. Anyone have any recommendations in that specific area?
 

Doctor Placebo

Soleimani's back. Tell a friend.
kiwifarms.net
A Gentle Introduction to Unqualified Reservations

The Decline of the West


Warning: you might get depressed.
 
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SilkGnut

Gnuts of the Finest Silk
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The Tyranny of Words by Stuart Chase is an excellent read on the way languages are formed in a way that encourages those who use them to think in certain ways and to adopt mental patterns that may be beneficial to those with influence over the language.

Propaganda, Crystallizing Public Opinion, and Public Relations by Edward Bernays are all wonderful insights in to the mind of the father of the modern age of thought influencing. Written by the man who was a nephew of Sigmund Freud and convinced the world to eat bacon for breakfast, he has countless valuable insights on how people's thoughts and actions can be directed by those who have the resources to spread their opinions to the populace.

Loserthink and Win Bigly: Persuasion in a World Where Facts Don't Matter by Scott Adams are much easier reads than the previous books, but still provide useful perspectives as to the mental traps that people find themselves in, as well as offering understanding towards those whose views seem impossibly twisted. While neither attempts to delve as deeply as most of the titles you will see in this thread, they are suitably thorough introductions to people who are starting to wake up to how little logic seems to matter in this day and age.

If you want something a bit more fun The Secret Teachings of All Ages by Manly Hall is a great introduction to esoterica. Though I would not take him (or any author) as an unbiased source on such matters, it is an incredibly dense work that helped me understand many "ridiculous" practices and beliefs that were held by folks through antiquity to the modern day. I may have never become an edgy teenage atheist if I had known that there was such depth to these "superstitions".
 
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Meat Target

I'm what you call a professional
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Loserthink by Scott Adams (yes, the Dilbert Guy)
Churchill, Hitler, and the Unnecessary War by Pat Buchanan
Generation Kill by Evan Wright (the miniseries is based on it)
Permanent Record by Edward Snowden (really illustrates what the Glowing Ones are capable of)
 
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