What are some good non-fiction books? - i wanna' be (((woke)))

Aidan

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This book is what a lot of narcissists read, especially wannabe entrepreneurs, and then go about their days treating it like the Ferengi Rules of Acquisition. It's worth reading among a list of books but not on its own, if you ask me. The military branches have a ton of good books to help with leadership that should be treated as a main dish supplemented by The 48 Laws of Power.

Here's an outdated link that can help anyone interested in finding the reading lists for the branch they think is the coolest. I like the Navy's list the most but I'd be lying if I said I read a lot of any of the lists.
 

Mister Qwerty

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This book is what a lot of narcissists read, especially wannabe entrepreneurs, and then go about their days treating it like the Ferengi Rules of Acquisition. It's worth reading among a list of books but not on its own, if you ask me. The military branches have a ton of good books to help with leadership that should be treated as a main dish supplemented by The 48 Laws of Power.

Here's an outdated link that can help anyone interested in finding the reading lists for the branch they think is the coolest. I like the Navy's list the most but I'd be lying if I said I read a lot of any of the lists.
Years ago I loaned that book to my sister to give me her opinion of it. She tried to read it during her lunch breaks at her job but never got time to read it (too busy working on a project) but she told me about an incident that happened at work. She had to leave her workstation to go out on an errand for a couple of hours and left the book on her desk. One of her female co-workers was drawn by the cover of the book (it's a rather simple but eye-catching design, a red book with a blue vertical stripe) and started perusing through the pages.

When my sister came back her co-worker was staring at her wide-eyed like she just discovered the identity of the murderer in an Alfred Hitchcock film and the killer just walked through the door. Visibly upset she uttered the words, "I… I… I didn't know you hated your job. Why didn't you say something?"
 

BrunoMattei

No I am not the Cinema Snob
True & Honest Fan
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I liked Doug Stanhope's two books Digging Up Mother and This Is Not Fame.
 

lemmiwinks

кремлеботы
True & Honest Fan
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I read both these Desmond Morris books many years ago. They had a significant impact on me at the time.

The Naked Ape (1967)
The Naked Ape, which was serialised in the Daily Mirror newspaper and has been translated into 23 languages, depicts human behaviour as largely evolved to meet the challenges of prehistoric life as a hunter (see Nature versus nurture). The book was so named because out of 193 species of monkeys and apes, only humans (Homo sapiens sapiens) are not covered in hair. Desmond Morris, the author, who had been the curator of mammals at London Zoo, said his book was intended to popularise and demystify science.[1]

Morris said that Homo sapiens not only have the largest brains of all higher primates, but that sexual selection in human evolution has caused humans to have the highest ratio of penis size to body mass. Morris conjectured that human ear-lobes developed as an additional erogenous zone to facilitate the extended sexuality necessary in the evolution of human monogamous pair bonding. Morris further stated that the more rounded shape of human female breasts means they are mainly a sexual signalling device rather than simply for providing milk for infants.[1]

Morris framed many features of human behaviour in the context of evolution at a time when cultural explanations were more orthodox. For example, Morris wrote that the intense human pair bond evolved so that men who were out hunting could trust that their mates back home were not having sex with other men, and suggested the possibility that sparse body hair evolved because the "nakedness" helped intensify pair bonding by increasing tactile pleasure.
The Human Zoo (1969)
The Human Zoo is a book written by the British zoologist Desmond Morris, published in 1969.[1] It is a follow-up to his earlier book The Naked Ape; both books examine how the biological nature of the human species has shaped the character of the cultures of the contemporary world.

The Human Zoo examines the nature of civilized society, especially in the cities. Morris compares the human inhabitants of a city to the animal inhabitants of a zoo, which have their survival needs provided for, but at the cost of living in an unnatural environment. Humans in their cities, and animals in their zoos, both have food and shelter provided for them, and have considerable free time on their hands. But they have to live in an unnatural environment, and are both likely to have problems in developing healthy social relationships, both are liable to suffer from isolation and boredom, and both live in a limited amount of physical space. The book explains how the inhabitants of cities and zoos have invented ways to deal with these problems, and the consequences that follow when they fail at dealing with them.

From this point of view, Morris examines why civilized society is the way it is. He offers explanations of the best and the worst features of civilized society. He examines the magnificent achievements of civilized society, the sublime explorations that make up science and the humanities, as well as the horrible behaviors of this same society such as war, slavery, and rape. This book, and Morris's earlier book The Naked Ape, are two of the early works in the field of sociobiology, which have both contributed much to contemporary understandings of society.

ETA: I just remembered another set of books that rocked my young world. Aleksander Solzhenitsyn's "The Gulag Archipelago" and "One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich". They may be old hat for some readers here, but definitely worth mentioning since no one else has yet.
 
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I'm gonna necro this thread instead of starting a new one as it follows what I'm looking for in recommendations. I really enjoy reading about unique military experiences that kind of verge on the unbelievable, but are true. Some books I really love if it helps:

- Agent Zig-Zag: A True Story of Nazi Espionage, Love, and Betrayal
- The Terrible Hours: The Greatest Submarine Rescue in History
- Marine!: The Life of Lt. Gen. Lewis B. Puller

What are some military books I'm missing out on?
Cochrane by Robert Harvey

Biography of a Royal Navy captain around the time of the napoleonic wars. A lot of the shit he pulls sounds like bad fiction, taking ships that dwarfed his own by pretending to be American, fought in independence wars as a private citizen in south America, invented shit, entered politics, fought a duel over a fancy dress costume.


Siege of Jadotville by Declan Power

150 Irish UN troops vs 3000 french/rhodesian/african mercenaries. There's a decent Netflix adaptation too.
 
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Wilhelm Bittrich

My pronouns: fuck/off
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Right now I'm reading "Tigers in the mud" by Otto Carius.
It's about the combat career of Otto Carius who started his career in a Pz 38(t) and later became of the Tiger aces of the Eastern Front.
His then tank gunner Unteroffizier Heinz Kramer (MIA Königsberg, January 1945), who later became a tank commander and a Knights Cross holder himself is credited with the only shot down IL-2 airplane by tank gun hit.
 
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