What are you reading right now? -

We need more education, not less. Every one of these fuckers who put xir phone in a microwave is a catastrophe, a retard given a tool xe is unqualified to wield.
You can put a monkey in a top hat but you can’t make it drink. The Government-mandated public school system has been an unmitigated disaster which churns out retards by the thousands with little scraps of paper that tells them their opinion means something when it doesn’t. Basic maths that you can learn from Its only function is operate as subsidised daycare and to transform people into docile rule-followers. You’ve seemingly read too much into Caplan’s unfortunate title.
 

Ginger Piglet

Burglar of Jess Phillips MP
True & Honest Fan
The History of the Runestaff, by Michael Moorcock.

Even though he threw it together, all four volumes, each in the course of a few days, because he needed some bloody money, it's damn good. The first volume, "The Jewel in the Skull," is very much the best, followed by the last one, "The Runestaff." Yeah, the characters can be a bit flat, and Yisselda becomes an action gurl in the last volume for no adequately explained reason, but it's great. Wonderfully trippy 1960s pulp fantasy.

I learnt also that the BBC entered talks in 2019 with Moorcock to turn it into a drama serial. Given how al-Beeb has wrecked Doctor Who, turned Killing Eve into a caricature of itself, trashed Casualty, and let The Last Kingdom slip through its fingers, I hope the talks fail. I can see it already. Because the bad guys are a degenerate feudal far-future British Empire they'll turn it into an extended pout about Brexit and then decide to, I dunno, insert loads of talking points about current year by making Yisselda into someone who can beat up hordes of very patient stunt men despite being about 90lbs soaking wet, make King Huon look like Dominic Cummings in a glass bubble rather than the deformed, impossibly ancient evil foetus being he is clearly described as, and make all the faceless enemy mooks into white men who exist solely to get rekt by Dorian's stunning and brave multicultural "fam."
 

AnOminous

shalom motherfucker
True & Honest Fan
Retired Staff
I learnt also that the BBC entered talks in 2019 with Moorcock to turn it into a drama serial. Given how al-Beeb has wrecked Doctor Who, turned Killing Eve into a caricature of itself, trashed Casualty, and let The Last Kingdom slip through its fingers, I hope the talks fail. I can see it already.

Moorcock is pretty super woke himself. Possibly that might shield him from the worst these idiots can do. I think the project would be better if he were personally involved somehow.
 

Ginger Piglet

Burglar of Jess Phillips MP
True & Honest Fan
Moorcock is pretty super woke himself.

He didn't used to be though. His classic pulp fantasy from the 1960s was as casually sexist as you like. Anita Sarkeesian would have endless fuel for her destined-never-to-appear videos. All the women characters are for the most part cringing maidens (Cymoril, Zarozinia, Yisselda pre-4th volume Hawkmoon) or femme fatale temptresses (Queen Yishana, Frawbra, Flana Mikosevaar), or just gratuitous whores as set decoration.
 
Joel F. Harrington: The Faithful Execution: Life and Death in the Seventeenth Century, basically drawing on Frantz Schmidt's diary of his life as executioner (<400), surgeon (thousands of patients as he had a practical knowledge of human anatomy) and humanitarian (he strangled counterfeiters who had the ancient penalty of burning before fire was lit, readily granted beheadings instead of the slow death on the gallows, and beheaded rather than drowned women).
 

AnOminous

shalom motherfucker
True & Honest Fan
Retired Staff
He didn't used to be though. His classic pulp fantasy from the 1960s was as casually sexist as you like.

He was always far-left, though, it was just that in the '60s that shit was seen as acceptable on the left. Frankly, it still is in a fantasy environment, although some of it has dated poorly regardless. Look at his criticisms of, for instance, Heinlein, in particular "Starship Stormtroopers," his broadside against the perceived fascism of Starship Troopers (I believe published originally in the New Worlds magazine which he edited).
 

AnOminous

shalom motherfucker
True & Honest Fan
Retired Staff
I've thought about reading that for a long time. Forbidden books are usually forbidden for a reason - because they are too awesome for most to handle

It is a literary novel and not remotely anti-Islamic. The novel contains a character who is clearly a parody of the Ayatollah Khomeini himself. Cat Stevens also hypocritically jumped on the jihad train, and there's also a character who is clearly a parody of Cat Stevens himself. This whole fatwa was just personal pique disguised as jihad.

It is IMO actually a brilliant novel but is nowhere near as edgy as you might have been led to believe.
 

Ginger Piglet

Burglar of Jess Phillips MP
True & Honest Fan
It is a literary novel and not remotely anti-Islamic. The novel contains a character who is clearly a parody of the Ayatollah Khomeini himself. Cat Stevens also hypocritically jumped on the jihad train, and there's also a character who is clearly a parody of Cat Stevens himself. This whole fatwa was just personal pique disguised as jihad.

It is IMO actually a brilliant novel but is nowhere near as edgy as you might have been led to believe.

I've heard myself that it is totally incomprehensible.
 
So a book club my friend started has us reading The Hunger Games. Since I don’t want to be rude (and she very clearly likes the books for some reason), I’m going to bitch about it here:
The present tense narrative is an unnecessary element of the prose, and only succeeds in making everything more of a chore to read. Collins is not an adept enough author to make it work, her syntax ends up all over the place. She seems to be rushing towards the titular games themselves, at the detriment of failing to set up the main character’s entire motivation for participating (voluntary participation to take the place of a randomly chosen tribute is stupid and undermines the entire point outlined in the book)
I’m one chapter in. I wouldn’t have read this on middle school let alone as an adult.
 

Ginger Piglet

Burglar of Jess Phillips MP
True & Honest Fan
So a book club my friend started has us reading The Hunger Games. Since I don’t want to be rude (and she very clearly likes the books for some reason), I’m going to bitch about it here:
The present tense narrative is an unnecessary element of the prose, and only succeeds in making everything more of a chore to read. Collins is not an adept enough author to make it work, her syntax ends up all over the place. She seems to be rushing towards the titular games themselves, at the detriment of failing to set up the main character’s entire motivation for participating (voluntary participation to take the place of a randomly chosen tribute is stupid and undermines the entire point outlined in the book)
I’m one chapter in. I wouldn’t have read this on middle school let alone as an adult.

That, and everything in it is pretty much lifted from Battle Royale.
 

Cast Iron Pan

Firstborn son of Artavius Quarterman
As a Soviet-style collapse unfolds in America, Grayson, equal parts philosopher and warrior but legitimately neither, makes a death-bed promise to watch over a couple with a child on the way. Driven by his own severe loss, he must make good on his promise, and carry the psychic consequences as he races headlong into the fallout of our imploding civilization. Set in the hallucinatory desert southwest, populated with hunter-killer teams, awash with refugees, third-country mercenaries, and hostile, conspiring elites, King of Dogs pits the beauty of language and western philosophical ideals against the deep depravity and violent decay of our times.
Recently I read 'King of Dogs' by Andrew Edwards. It's like an apocalyptic rambo-type adventure. High testosterone, lots of firearms and firefights, yet the writing doesn't lack, ringing with a certain poetic quality. Overall a fun, though-provoking read.


The Wheel:
This method of torture and execution took many forms. Sometimes the victims were staked out on the ground and a large wheel would be used to smash each of their limbs and joints including the hips and shoulders. In other cases, the victim was tied upon a wheel and the executioner would use bars, clubs or hammers to accomplish the same result. The idea was to break all of the bones in the body without breaking the skin or causing lethal injury. In either case, the shattered limbs of the victim were usually ‘laced’ through the spokes of the wheel and then mounted on a pole and displayed to the populace, where they would slowly and agonizingly die of hunger, thirst and exposure (and presumably, internal bleeding).
Currently reading 'The Big Book of Pain and Torture'. The kind of misery that someone must have went through while being put to the question on the wheel I cannot even imagine.
 

Foltest

Land ska med lag byggas
Just got done with Hue 1968 by Mark Bowden.
It is a really good book and is in same style as Black Hawk down and he interview people from both side.
 

AbyssStarer

Missionary of the Birb Church
I just finished Memoirs of a Geisha and am going to start Geisha, a Life by Iwasaki Mineko. Looking to compare the two.
I looked at the goodreads reviews of Memoirs after finishing it and found the young'ns whining about "problematic" style of writing amusing.
 

Ginger Piglet

Burglar of Jess Phillips MP
True & Honest Fan
I just finished Memoirs of a Geisha and am going to start Geisha, a Life by Iwasaki Mineko. Looking to compare the two.
I looked at the goodreads reviews of Memoirs after finishing it and found the young'ns whining about "problematic" style of writing amusing.

To be fair he did kinda embellish the concept of the mizuage into auctioning off of virginity which wasn't always the case, apparently.
 

Hylics

May you find peace.
I've currently reading some miscellaneous poems by W.B. Yeats. One I'm currently really enjoying his "The Indian to His Love," originally published in his 1889 collection "Crossways."


It's such an interesting poem because it has a unique tone compared to many other poems in this collection. It's melancholic and at points destitute, but it shows those negative feelings through beautiful and positive imagery. The loneliness expressed through the poem is meant to be viewed as something natural and beautiful, not abhorrent. It's a very comforting read.
 
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