What are you reading right now? -

AnOminous

So what?
True & Honest Fan
Retired Staff
kiwifarms.net
I read "On the Road" last year and the plot was more interesting than the writing, if that makes sense. Can't say I'd ever really recommend it to anyone. Perhaps the story of how the book was written is more interesting than the book, too, lol
I read a biography of Jack Kerouac that was more interesting than anything he ever wrote.
 

UnsufficentBoobage

Atleast things I wanna fuck are 3D
kiwifarms.net
Fast-read through all them comics based on "Big trouble in Little China", and boy, are they dumb compared to original movie, but Old Man Jack (from 2018, can be read here) absolutely takes the cake with a goddamn vore joke and this little gem:
1598224738845.png
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That's why no-one, even original creators, should be allowed to continue twenty-year-old things.
 

RockPaper

kiwifarms.net
For the last year, I've been catching up on the 1632 universe.

My favorite genre is time travel/alternate history, so the fact that this book series is 20 years old and until recently I had never heard of it, is a bit of an embarrassment for my lack of awareness.

I wouldn't call the stable of authors that have contributed to this thing a Pulitzer prize-worthy bunch or anything, but they are certainly adequate and serviceable. The publication of this stuff is still running after 20 years, with another book just recently released and another due in 6 months with no signs of ending. There also dozens of issues of periodicals going back years with (non-shitty) fanfiction contributions and technical articles.

I'm still buried in the middle of it, but I find the premise/concept fascinating, there are a lot of variables and unintended consequences, nobody really knows where it's going, and like I said the genre is right in my wheelhouse.
 

wtfNeedSignUp

kiwifarms.net
I promised a friend that I'll read 'The Rational Male' because it will "improve my life". It's at least an interesting rabbit hole of how incels think. And I kinda want to make a thread about it (at least will get me the motivation to slog through it). Be free to rate me as you see fit, because it is cringe of the highest order.

From the first two hours of the audio book (no fucking way I'm using anything above my commuting time for this dreck) the author tries to argue that women are basically snakes who will fuck over their mates to maximize their self-happiness (it's the same as using Twitter as an example for how all left/right people think, we as humans like to use extreme cases as validations for entire populations).
There is an idiotic anecdote about the "most powerful man" being some guy who left his wife, children and career and had an interesting life as a painter (like saying the most successful man being a guy who bought a lottery ticket and won, there are far more people who did the same and ruined their own and family's lives).
Finally I reached the expected alpha vs. beta, and just as before the "ultimate alpha" is apparently some idiotic teenager who accidently invited tens of thousands of people to his house party and wrecked his place. The idea is that alpha is someone who is unrepented by his behavior, a thing that would have been alright if the author hasn't immediately used Genghis Khan as an example of an alpha, despite him almost assuredly being someone who had to notice his behavior to reach where he did. In general, the whole alpha vs. beta is just self defeating cringe that is about as real as splitting the word into "geniuses" and "idiots".
The book in general complains about a "pro-feminine" culture without really any real proofs besides few social cases where women hold the dominant hand.

Overall from what I read, it seems to be a manipulative bit of work to get people with low self-esteem and/or intelligence to think they understand how the world works, using broad and distasteful arguments that don't seem to do much besides appeal to people's sense of injustice.
 

Troon Draugur

Ghola-posting Naib
True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
I promised a friend that I'll read 'The Rational Male' because it will "improve my life". It's at least an interesting rabbit hole of how incels think. And I kinda want to make a thread about it (at least will get me the motivation to slog through it). Be free to rate me as you see fit, because it is cringe of the highest order.

From the first two hours of the audio book (no fucking way I'm using anything above my commuting time for this dreck) the author tries to argue that women are basically snakes who will fuck over their mates to maximize their self-happiness (it's the same as using Twitter as an example for how all left/right people think, we as humans like to use extreme cases as validations for entire populations).
There is an idiotic anecdote about the "most powerful man" being some guy who left his wife, children and career and had an interesting life as a painter (like saying the most successful man being a guy who bought a lottery ticket and won, there are far more people who did the same and ruined their own and family's lives).
Finally I reached the expected alpha vs. beta, and just as before the "ultimate alpha" is apparently some idiotic teenager who accidently invited tens of thousands of people to his house party and wrecked his place. The idea is that alpha is someone who is unrepented by his behavior, a thing that would have been alright if the author hasn't immediately used Genghis Khan as an example of an alpha, despite him almost assuredly being someone who had to notice his behavior to reach where he did. In general, the whole alpha vs. beta is just self defeating cringe that is about as real as splitting the word into "geniuses" and "idiots".
The book in general complains about a "pro-feminine" culture without really any real proofs besides few social cases where women hold the dominant hand.

Overall from what I read, it seems to be a manipulative bit of work to get people with low self-esteem and/or intelligence to think they understand how the world works, using broad and distasteful arguments that don't seem to do much besides appeal to people's sense of injustice.
Tomassi's an asshat and an utter hack of a writer. Kudos on sticking with it, though.
 

Andrew Neiman

I'll cue you!
kiwifarms.net
Currently (re-)reading the Iliad. Trying to catch up on the Big Classics I haven't read before: the Odyssey, the Divine Comedy, the Canterbury Tales, Paradise Lost etc.
I read "On the Road" last year and the plot was more interesting than the writing, if that makes sense. Can't say I'd ever really recommend it to anyone. Perhaps the story of how the book was written is more interesting than the book, too, lol
I like everything about Kerouac except his books.
 

Slimy Time

Muscle Bound Monster
kiwifarms.net
Read the Warhammer Fantasy novel of "Sword of Justice" by Chris Wraight yesterday. Something nice and enjoyable to read, escapist fantasy, nothing too heavy. Reading the follow up book "Sword of Vengeance" today, hope to finish it tonight or tomorrow. Enjoyable. Really like Wraight's style.
 
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cuÞbert

kiwifarms.net
Continuing my current ancient Roman binge, I started reading Roma by Steven Saylor again (I only got halfway through before I had to take it back to library). Its a story that covers a thousand years of ancient history, starting with nomadic salt traders travelling down the Tiber in 1000 BC, over 200 years before Rome was founded, and ending with the rise of Augustus. It revolves around the interactions between generations of two families and their dealings with both historical and semi-historical figures (Romulus, Coriolanus, Scipio, the Grachii bros, Caesar)

What's surprising is that Steven Saylor used to write homosexual erotica and yet his books are pretty darn good and not degenerate at all.
 

Jasonfan89

Aka horrorfan89
kiwifarms.net
Not currently reading but wanna buy copies when I get my next paychec: Dracula, frankenstein, dr jekyll and mr hyde, the hp lovecraft collection, and either the howling (the original novel) or cycle of the werewolf. Im a horror fiction fan I'm general but I always love reading/watching the classics as October draws closer.
 

L50LasPak

Life on the outside ain't what it used to be.
kiwifarms.net
I picked up Battle Born: Lapis Lazuli by the author of Terminal Lance. Money is a little bit tight right now, so I really hesitated clicking that purchase button, but I have to say it is instantly one of the most incredible books I currently own. I was expecting a graphic novel along the lines of his last outing, The White Donkey that contained a similar art style to his much more light hearted webcomic.

What I got instead was a massive hardcover book that has the density of a dead star. The art on each page is absolutely stunning, its actually kind of overwhelming to read sometimes because each picture is like a painting. I'm tempted to post screencaps, but I don't think the shitty camera on my phone can actually do what I'm looking at justice. I own quite a few coffee table art books and a small handful of graphic novels, but let me tell you, this is something really, really special. If you like art or like war stories, pick this one up right away.
 

Fromtheblackdepths

A Pelagic Horror Arrives
kiwifarms.net
I picked up Battle Born: Lapis Lazuli by the author of Terminal Lance. Money is a little bit tight right now,m so I really hesitated clicking that purchase button, but I have to say it is instantly one of thte most incredible books I currently own. I was expecting a graphic novel along the lines of his last outing, The White Donkey that contained a similar art style to his much more light hearted comics.

What I got instead was a massive hardcover book that weighs a ton. The art on each page is absolutely stunning, its actually kind of overwhelming to read sometimes because each picture is like a painting. I'm tempted to post screencaps, but I don't think the shitty camera on my phone can actually do what I'm looking at justice. I own quite a few coffee table art books and a small handful of graphic novels, but let me tell you, this is something really, really special. If you like art or like war stories, pick this one up right away.
What's it about? I could look it up but I like when people tell me the synopsis of something they enjoy.
 
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L50LasPak

Life on the outside ain't what it used to be.
kiwifarms.net
What's it about? I could look it up but I like when people tell me the synopsis of something they enjoy.
I haven't finished reading it yet, I'm only about halfway, but the premise is that its about a group of soldiers in Afghanistan that must secure a lapiz lazuli mine that's been taken over by the Taliban. The mine referred to in the stories is infact one of the largest deposits of the mineral in the world so its obviously a big target. I get the sense that the story is supposed to be set a bit in the future from now based on the technology present in some scenes, but Maximilian is an experienced war veteran and the book clearly draws from what he's seen in real life.

(Tangent: I own a small chunk of lapiz and somehow Maximilian illustrates the starfield-like texture of it almost picture perfect in the book.)

Its definitely not a story strictly about hardcore combat or something like Generation Kill, though I expect shit to get real later on just guessing by his last book. its very long and comtemplative, with these huge panoramic vistas and lots of very atmospheric shots. There's great attention to detail and a surprising use of negative space, which is interesting since the book is in full color and not greyscale.
 
I am trying to jump on the Steven Erikson hypewagon to read the Malazan books, but the thing is a leviathan: 10 books with more than 11K pages. It was released over a peroid of 12 years, not saying a certain other fantasy author could learn a thing or two but Jesus.
 
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Troon Draugur

Ghola-posting Naib
True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
I am trying to jump on the Steven Erikson hypewagon to read the Malazan books, but the thing is a leviathan: 10 books with more than 11K pages. It was released over a peroid of 12 years, not saying a certain other fantasy author could learn a thing or two but Jesus.
I got recommended these by a friend and got the complete edition. It's an incredibly effective doorstop. Easily the most boring fiction books I've ever read. I genuinely don't get the hype; apart from the sheer size, there's nothing at all remarkable about the Malazan books.
 

Maskull

funpostin
kiwifarms.net
I revisited Cormac McCarthy today. I'd read everything he'd written years ago except for his The Road. I have mixed opinion. His prose is as good as it has every been and I think it a fine piece of storytelling but for how he hammers in the hopelessness of living in a dying world he really screwed it with the ending.

I am trying to jump on the Steven Erikson hypewagon to read the Malazan books, but the thing is a leviathan: 10 books with more than 11K pages. It was released over a peroid of 12 years, not saying a certain other fantasy author could learn a thing or two but Jesus.
Have you ever given Gene Wolfe's Book of the New Sun consideration? I have Erikson and Wolfe's opuses inextricably intertwined in mind and always recommend the other of the two when one is mentioned.
The Dying Earth by Jack Vance.
I haven't read this in over a decade. There's a story where the protagonist is rolling slowly down a river on a raft playing cards with a number of other travelers using his own mismatched deck. The imagery of it with the dying sun slowly sinking and coloring the sky in blood has stuck in my mind since. Do you remember which story this scene takes place?
Money is a little bit tight right now, so I really hesitated clicking that purchase button
You need to get yourself a library card. There's a good piracy thread in TSIC too. I recommend to everyone to only buy reference books or books they've read and plan to re-read.
Not currently reading but wanna buy copies when I get my next paychec: Dracula, frankenstein, dr jekyll and mr hyde, the hp lovecraft collection, and either the howling (the original novel) or cycle of the werewolf. Im a horror fiction fan I'm general but I always love reading/watching the classics as October draws closer.
Just about all of those can be found in free ebook form as they've fallen into public domain.
 
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alreadyhome

kiwifarms.net
I revisited Cormac McCarthy today. I'd read everything he'd written years ago except for his The Road. I have mixed opinion. His prose is as good as it has every been and I think it a fine piece of storytelling but for how he hammers in the hopelessness of living in a dying world he really screwed it with the ending.


Have you ever given Gene Wolfe's Book of the New Sun consideration? I have Erikson and Wolfe's opuses inextricably intertwined in mind and always recommend the other of the two when one is mentioned.

I haven't read this in over a decade. There's a story where the protagonist is rolling slowly down a river on a raft playing cards with a number of other travelers using his own mismatched deck. The imagery of it with the dying sun slowly sinking and coloring the sky in blood has stuck in my mind since. Do you remember which story this scene takes place?
Fascinating tidbits of detail here. Is there anything more poignant than that scene where the dying sun colors the sky in blood? Who else could have interpreted a sunset thusly? When I read it myself, I was blown away by the genius of such pathos, as were you, obviously.
 
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