• "i am unfortunately still alive"

What are you reading right now?

Discussion in 'Art & Literature' started by AtroposHeart, Jun 18, 2013.

  1. Gods of Mars by Edgar Rice Burroughs. The Barsoom series is a favorite of mine, courtesy of my dad giving me several of his older sci-fi books when I was a teen.
     
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  2. I've just finished High Rise by J. G. Ballard, which is a great piece of not-quite-sci-fi where a bunch of upper-middle class people living in a skyscraper go nuts and declare war on each other. Ballard wrote a lot of novels based on the premise of "what if modern urban living got really fucked up?" and that's one of his best known. I believe it was made into a film recently, which I've not seen yet but intend to.

    At the moment I'm on The Sirens of Titan by Kurt Vonnegut, which has Vonnegut's usual blend of nihilism and bleak humour, but in a science fiction setting.
     
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  3. Crawlers by author Ray Garton is tale of a small town being invaded by killer flowers which turn people into gun-toting zombies that either kill the remaining survivors or worse, turn them into more gun-toting zombies!

    The Blob by David Bischoff is the novelization for the remake of the Blob from the 80's. Like the movie the story is very similar to the plot of the film. However, what's great about this book is the character development not featured in the final film. You're able to rediscover these characters in new light and appreciate them in a whole new way. Also, we're able to see the world from the point of view of the Blob. Well, as much you can get from a hungry and growing gelatinous blob of PAIN!

    The Inseminoids by Larry Miller. This is the script novelization very different from the film of the same name. In the movie, Sandy is forcefully artificially inseminated by the mysterious alien and soon she's pregnant with the creatures' twin spawn. The book, however, is the more erotic as everyone at the space base has sex. Instead of being artificially inseminated like in the movie, Sandy is raped by the alien with it's two, yes I said two! foot long "rods" and impregnated. Similar to the movie she gains superhuman strength as she attacks her crew because of the alien spawn controlling her mind. But what i love about the book is that she transforms into the alien as the story ends and we see giving birth to the twins, which consume the flesh off her former comrades as they then consume their mother. Soon after they escape when a crew checks out the destruction of the base, and we end on a cliff hanger as the alien/human monster aliens escape the planet in the spaceship!

    Next up on my list is The Nest with killer cockroaches and Slugs featuring killer slugs!

     
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  4. The Warren Report.
    One of America's best works of fiction.
     
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  5. Thank you for such an awesome reccomendation. I just ordered Inseminoids and I can't wait for it.

    Currently reading "It" again seeing how the new film was amazing. This will be my tenth time reading this book.
     
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    Meat_Puppet

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  6. I haven't read much in a couple years and contented myself with audio books while an ever increasing backlog sits unread on the shelves. There is something different about physically holding a book and reading it, so I started Red Rising by Pierce Brown and Through Our Enemies' Eyes by Michael Scheuer. I've seen Red Rising recommended numerous times as a dystopian sci-fi set in a future with a rigid caste system. It's right up my alley and first book in a trilogy. Hopefully it's good. Through our Enemies' Eyes is about bin Laden and al Qaeda in the early 2000s. It was rather revolutionary when first published anonymously in 2002 for its insight and the fact that it used only publicly available information. It turned out to be written by a rather notorious CIA veteran who headed the bin Laden unit during the late 90s and got himself blacklisted by the MSM in 2004 for talking shit about Israel in front of Congress. I'm big into non-fiction about terrorism/counter-terrorism and have been reading Mike's articles for a years. His blog can be rather antagonistic and blunt, but his professional writings are top notch. I figured it was a long time coming to start working through his books.
     
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  7. Now reading No Man's Land by Simon Tolkien. That is the grandson of the Tolkien we all know. It is like a soap opera of how a penniless young man who was the son of a unionist with lefty tendencies on the onset of WWI. He became the foster son of a rich landowner because his builder father saved the landowner from a fire started from a worker's strike. Our hero had a love rival whom his love interest married and he was sent to war.

    Only managed to read the first part where I felt it was a bit slow taking time to detail how life in a London slum and how life in a miner's village were like. I find it a bit convenient that our hero should be able to experience himself first hand what it feels like to be a person of the working class then landowning classes and how life in urban and rural UK felt like.

    I like the fact that our hero was born in Islington, the leftiest place I can think of. The lines our hero's father spewed is unintentionally funny. Upon seeing some destitute people, he goes on a rant directed at his son who was most likely less than 10 years old then that "they are the poor of London and that they worked hard all their lives only to be chewed, spat out and left to die by capitalists". At King Edward's funeral, Daddy called the King "the king of his class, king of the one percent(?!) who owns half the wealth of his country and wants to keep it that way". I wonder if people in early 20th century Britain spoke like that.

    The story picks up pace after the father's death and our hero had to deal with his love rival and antagonist for the rest of the book. I swear that Simon Tolkien drew inspiration from Elliot Rodger when he wrote that antagonist. He is stunted by scarlet fever, spoiled by his mother, having a sense of entitlement, being unable to approach women properly and I believe he committed suicide in the end?

    I might sound a bit critical of this book but I enjoyed reading it. Many books these days don't bother to explain what is going on leaving the reader to guess what is happening. At least I understood where our characters come from and what they do. If I were to flip through books like A Game of Thrones I would have to read it again and again to figure out what is happening.
     
    #1007 L. Duse, Sep 16, 2017 at 8:35 PM
    Last edited: Sep 16, 2017 at 11:34 PM
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  8. Dune Messiah. The size of this thing is such a letdown, but considering it originally was supposed to be the final part of the original book it could have been worse. May end up ordering the next book, or I may just leave it because Dune (for me) is Paul's story. Dunno, but I do know at most I'm only going to tackle the original 6 novels.
     
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  9. Watership Down.

    It's a book, about Rabbits.
     
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    Valiant

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  10. I did nothing but read during Hurricane Irma while our power was out and put Lovecraft on hold because of it (I'm on "The Festival"), I re-read while in the dark:

    -The Zombie Survival Guide and World War Z (which still deserves a better adaption than Brad Pitt's abortion)
    -Water For Elephants
    -Bioshock: Rapture (still makes me weep for Bill McDonagh)
    -One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest
    -100 Wicked Little Witch Stories (a short story compendium)
    -Haunted
     
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  11. Trying to figure out how to feel about Dune Messiah now that I'm done. It really felt like it was a section of the first book that was removed then padded out to make a sequel, but it still gave me a great sense of closure to Paul's story. I not sure I'm done with this universe for a while now or I'll read Children of Dune to finish out the originally-planned trilogy.
     
    #1011 Kamen Rider Black RX, Sep 19, 2017 at 10:49 PM
    Last edited: Sep 19, 2017 at 11:09 PM
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  12. Monster by Bo Eriksson. Its a popular scientific book about fear, and the monsters people have created from the stone age until now. Its a fun read if youre into history, religion and anthropology!
     
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  13. I'm finally at the halfway point of Game of Thrones and I must say that although the book is pretty slow paced at first, it's really starting to make up for it with the intense action scenes.
     
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