What entertainment website fell the hardest this decade? -

oldTireWater

Incompetent as fuck
kiwifarms.net
The AV Club is poison just like the rest of GMG, with the minor exception of Jalopnik. You can now see the infection spread through Jalopnik in the comments (the writers are already trash). The car enthusiasts are being overwhelmed by the outrage enthusiasts. For a automotive website they sure preach mass-transit a lot. I think the closure of Splinter and Deadspin forced the faggots to find new targets.
 

Dom Cruise

kiwifarms.net
The AV Club is poison just like the rest of GMG, with the minor exception of Jalopnik. You can now see the infection spread through Jalopnik in the comments (the writers are already trash). The car enthusiasts are being overwhelmed by the outrage enthusiasts. For a automotive website they sure preach mass-transit a lot. I think the closure of Splinter and Deadspin forced the faggots to find new targets.
Yes, that whole network is a big pile of fail.

One of the main things that made me drop the AV Club for good was being forced to also see headlines from The Root, aka the worst site on the internet.
 

Cardenio

Yeed
True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
I'll always be thankful for the AV Club convincing me to watch "Party Down" which I think is one of the best sitcoms of the 2000s era. It's amusing that the site was once cool enough to have funny gimmick posters like ZODIACMOTHERFUCKER in the comments section, sadly it got corporatized and they didn't want advertisers seeing the commentators wish "canceraids" on each other.
 

albertbrown26

kiwifarms.net
I actually remember reading about this back in high school. It went down the same way as the Onion: unnecessarily political and over the top with random Trump references that had nothing to do with film, media, TV or gaming.

I react to the byline of AVClub the same way I do Vice:

"Oh, I remember when they weren't complete shit."
I'll always be thankful for the AV Club convincing me to watch "Party Down" which I think is one of the best sitcoms of the 2000s era. It's amusing that the site was once cool enough to have funny gimmick posters like ZODIACMOTHERFUCKER in the comments section, sadly it got corporatized and they didn't want advertisers seeing the commentators wish "canceraids" on each other.
Believe it or not, their Breaking Bad reviews and retrospect as well as their classic recommendations list were the best things that the site had going for them. But, like most of websites that are interested in popular culture, it went downhill as soon as political correctness destroyed them.
 
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Dom Cruise

kiwifarms.net
About half of the replies in this thread about formerly good websites are some combination of The AV Club, Cracked or The AV Club and Cracked.
I figured the site was noteworthy enough for it's own thread.

Their reviews are usually hilariously wrong. I guess there's some value in that.
One big wake up call was their review of Stephen King's The Outsider, which the review led you to believe was supposed to be some treatise about Trump's America instead of having nothing to do with Trump other than a few cultural references which King has always put cultural references in his books.

It was having read it myself and realizing that basically everything they were going to talk about on the AV Club was going to be spun in some way to relating to Trump no matter how big of a stretch that was one of the reasons I soon after stopped visiting.
 

Tor Lugosi

kiwifarms.net
Yeah, I used to really like the AV Club. They had these very illuminating post-episode Hannibal interviews with Bryan Fuller that gave a great insider's look into the series. The comment section for their Person of Interest reviews was the best place to talk about the show (for some reason a lot of other places hated that it slowly became more serialized and cyberpunk, which baffles me).
 

Syaoran Li

Beware The Walkin' Dude
kiwifarms.net
I'd say the golden age of YouTube was before that. Back when you could easily stream damn near any show without getting kicked.
Agreed.

I first discovered YouTube in 2007 and looking back, I'd say that the "Golden Age" of YouTube would've been the very early years of 2005-2008. Looking back, I'd say the first real warning sign of what was to come later on would've been the copyright crackdowns from Viacom and Warner Music Group back in 2009 or so.

While 2009-2013 YouTube was decent in its own right and much better than the Current Year era of YouTube, it didn't have the magic of early YouTube. Really, the only thing from that era that I don't miss is the ten minute limit for video length.
 

Bread Fetishist

Public enemy to bakers everywhere
kiwifarms.net
All I know about AV Club is that they’re Simpsons shills. Their reviews of the modern episodes feel like they’re desperately trying to convince people that it’s still good.
 

sasazuka

Standing in the school hallway.
kiwifarms.net
While 2009-2013 YouTube was decent in its own right and much better than the Current Year era of YouTube, it didn't have the magic of early YouTube. Really, the only thing from that era that I don't miss is the ten minute limit for video length.
In the earliest days of Youtube, that ten minute limit wasn't there so you could watch whole episodes of Lost in one 44 minute chunk. I think the 10-minute limit was imposed around the end of 2006 if I remember correctly as a temporary measure until they figured out how to detect and remove copyrighted content automatically.
 

Dom Cruise

kiwifarms.net
Agreed.

I first discovered YouTube in 2007 and looking back, I'd say that the "Golden Age" of YouTube would've been the very early years of 2005-2008. Looking back, I'd say the first real warning sign of what was to come later on would've been the copyright crackdowns from Viacom and Warner Music Group back in 2009 or so.

While 2009-2013 YouTube was decent in its own right and much better than the Current Year era of YouTube, it didn't have the magic of early YouTube. Really, the only thing from that era that I don't miss is the ten minute limit for video length.
On the other hand, whenever I watch a 2006/2007 era Youtube video today I'm often horrified by how utterly awful the picture quality is, just a total blurry, pixelated mess compared to today's perfect HD quality.

There's definitely good memories of the wild west days of Youtube, but for picture quality reasons alone I have a hard time calling it the "golden age"

All I know about AV Club is that they’re Simpsons shills. Their reviews of the modern episodes feel like they’re desperately trying to convince people that it’s still good.
The site was utterly obsessed with the Simpsons, that's one thing I remember, but everyone seemed to agree the show was no longer good so it surprises me to see them shill for the modern Simpsons today.
 

Save the Loli

kiwifarms.net
The AV Club is poison just like the rest of GMG, with the minor exception of Jalopnik. You can now see the infection spread through Jalopnik in the comments (the writers are already trash). The car enthusiasts are being overwhelmed by the outrage enthusiasts. For a automotive website they sure preach mass-transit a lot. I think the closure of Splinter and Deadspin forced the faggots to find new targets.
Do car enthusiasts even read Jalopnik? Like 90% of them are white people and the demographic skews to boomers. I don't want to give those "journalists" clicks but I'm guessing their articles in the past five years read things like "Why all cars will be like SmartCars in the future and that's a good thing" and "Here's why cars with low gas mileage is a sign of toxic masculinity" and other outrage clickbait like that.
Agreed.

I first discovered YouTube in 2007 and looking back, I'd say that the "Golden Age" of YouTube would've been the very early years of 2005-2008. Looking back, I'd say the first real warning sign of what was to come later on would've been the copyright crackdowns from Viacom and Warner Music Group back in 2009 or so.

While 2009-2013 YouTube was decent in its own right and much better than the Current Year era of YouTube, it didn't have the magic of early YouTube. Really, the only thing from that era that I don't miss is the ten minute limit for video length.
Seriously, there was so much crazy shit there. It was great back then.
In the earliest days of Youtube, that ten minute limit wasn't there so you could watch whole episodes of Lost in one 44 minute chunk. I think the 10-minute limit was imposed around the end of 2006 if I remember correctly as a temporary measure until they figured out how to detect and remove copyrighted content automatically.
It sure didn't work, I watched a bunch of animu there 10 minute clips at a time before I learned how to torrent.
 
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Agreed.

I first discovered YouTube in 2007 and looking back, I'd say that the "Golden Age" of YouTube would've been the very early years of 2005-2008. Looking back, I'd say the first real warning sign of what was to come later on would've been the copyright crackdowns from Viacom and Warner Music Group back in 2009 or so.

While 2009-2013 YouTube was decent in its own right and much better than the Current Year era of YouTube, it didn't have the magic of early YouTube. Really, the only thing from that era that I don't miss is the ten minute limit for video length.
06-09 Youtube was the shit. People producing routine content without the endgame of being "YouTubers" cranked out comedy gold at an insane frequency. People whine about muh Adpocalypse "killing Youtube" but there complete freedom of watching people crank out videos just for fun was god-tier and I'd argue the idea that it became a viable career path and the entire userbase wanting to adapt to that killed the platform harder than the copyright shenanigans.
 

Bread Fetishist

Public enemy to bakers everywhere
kiwifarms.net
06-09 Youtube was the shit. People producing routine content without the endgame of being "YouTubers" cranked out comedy gold at an insane frequency. People whine about muh Adpocalypse "killing Youtube" but there complete freedom of watching people crank out videos just for fun was god-tier and I'd argue the idea that it became a viable career path and the entire userbase wanting to adapt to that killed the platform harder than the copyright shenanigans.
Yeah, the commercialisation of the site was a double-edged sword.
 
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