What is the most dangerous household Aerosol for your eyes/health? - Safety is number one.

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TroonsDid911

kiwifarms.net
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Apr 6, 2021
I want to avoid using dangerous Aerosols that can travel a fair distance away when sprayed and cause immediate damage or severe irritation to the eyes and/or breathing. I want to make sure I don't carry these around while I'm cleaning ovens for example. I often clean ovens in dangerous areas of the city so I definitely don't want to bring something hazardous to others with me while Im cleaning.

Im not buying or carrying anything that would be considered illegal of course, I simply want to protect my safety and the safety of other strangers around me while Im cleaning low income housing projects at 3am in the morning. I want to make sure I only carry safe chemicals that can't cause accidents. For example, what if Im cleaning an oven in an apartment and a stranger accidentally walks in to the wrong apartment and walks towards me holding a kitchen knife he was going to use to chop some tomatoes with and I suddenly turn around while cleaning the oven holding the trigger down and accidentally spray him in the face before he has a chance to explain himself up close to me like the good stranger he is. Safety is number one, and as a responsible British/Canadian/New Zealand/European person I want to make sure I can properly clean ovens while protecting the multicultural enrichment our countries are known for. After all, carrying dangerous things like knives, guns, pepper spray, or clubs is wrong even if its self defense for your life. A good Canadian/European/Brit will always pull out their cellphone and wait 10 minutes for the police to arrive.

Any recommendations on what chemicals to avoid?
 

Un Platano

big blatano xDDDD
True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
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Apr 20, 2016
Muriatic acid (HCl) is bad. Generally the acid sold as a cleaning supply is about 20% HCl, but you can get reagent grade HCl at up to 38% concentration. You know you've got the strong stuff when you dump it in the toilet and have to evacuate the bathroom because of the toxic gas it puts out. Not only would it be excruciatingly painful if sprayed in your face but it would also probably leave them permanently maimed from the chemical burns. Nasty stuff.

Sulfuric acid could also theoretically be used as a cleaning supply, but we generally don't because it's so damaging to living tissue in the event that you accidentally get it on yourself or anyone else. You'd best stick to HCl for cleaning.
 

ColtWalker1847

kiwifarms.net
Joined
Dec 20, 2017
Muriatic acid (HCl) is bad. Generally the acid sold as a cleaning supply is about 20% HCl, but you can get reagent grade HCl at up to 38% concentration. You know you've got the strong stuff when you dump it in the toilet and have to evacuate the bathroom because of the toxic gas it puts out. Not only would it be excruciatingly painful if sprayed in your face but it would also probably leave them permanently maimed from the chemical burns. Nasty stuff.

Sulfuric acid could also theoretically be used as a cleaning supply, but we generally don't because it's so damaging to living tissue in the event that you accidentally get it on yourself or anyone else. You'd best stick to HCl for cleaning.
Strong bases are even worse. Lye will melt your skin off and turn your fatty tissue into soap. Serious tissue damage to things like eyes happens immediately.

Rather than mess around with that dangerous stuff I suggest using more elbow grease. Just get in those ovens and scrub them really really well. But it's dark in there so you are going to need a light. Maglite makes a 6 D-cell flashlight that works really well at illuminating those kinds of places. You can carry it on your shoulder with your dominant hand and shine the light while your non-dominant hand scrubs away. The light is really bright too so it can be used to dazzle any scary rats or cockroaches you find cleaning kitchens and disorient them.

I've found it to be really helpful when I'm doing cleaning projects in places like New Jersey where they are also very concerned about safety.
 

TroonsDid911

kiwifarms.net
Joined
Apr 6, 2021
Strong bases are even worse. Lye will melt your skin off and turn your fatty tissue into soap. Serious tissue damage to things like eyes happens immediately.

Rather than mess around with that dangerous stuff I suggest using more elbow grease. Just get in those ovens and scrub them really really well. But it's dark in there so you are going to need a light. Maglite makes a 6 D-cell flashlight that works really well at illuminating those kinds of places. You can carry it on your shoulder with your dominant hand and shine the light while your non-dominant hand scrubs away. The light is really bright too so it can be used to dazzle any scary rats or cockroaches you find cleaning kitchens and disorient them.

I've found it to be really helpful when I'm doing cleaning projects in places like New Jersey where they are also very concerned about safety.

Thats a very useful idea. I actually already have a good flashlight thats nice and big one. Its a little heavy, but it comes with a powerful strobing feature that I can use to signal people in emergencies. Im thinking Ill hold my flashlight in one hand and pre-apply my oven cleaner with the other, then I can really scrub it clean.
 

naaaaiiiiillllll!!!

Null thought I was British, lol
kiwifarms.net
Joined
Aug 25, 2019
Muriatic acid (HCl) is bad. Generally the acid sold as a cleaning supply is about 20% HCl, but you can get reagent grade HCl at up to 38% concentration. You know you've got the strong stuff when you dump it in the toilet and have to evacuate the bathroom because of the toxic gas it puts out. Not only would it be excruciatingly painful if sprayed in your face but it would also probably leave them permanently maimed from the chemical burns. Nasty stuff.

Sulfuric acid could also theoretically be used as a cleaning supply, but we generally don't because it's so damaging to living tissue in the event that you accidentally get it on yourself or anyone else. You'd best stick to HCl for cleaning.
HCl is a native gas, which is why it’s sold as a liquid solution (also why it’s so volatile and makes enclosed spaces w/o ventilation not fun). Sulfuric acid, in pure form, is a molasses-like viscous liquid, which is “sort of” safer in confined spaces w/o ventilation. Ultimately, acids are better than other chemicals because immediate contact and flushing with running water mitigates most/all damage. Sodium bicarbonate (baking soda) in water like a slurry is a great instant neutralizer on non-bodily surfaces too in case of spills (again, running water over exposed body is best).

Bases, like lye (sodium hydroxide) are worse but the above strategies work as well. The key is access to ventilation and lots of water in case of emergency before using them.

The really scary shit for cleaning are items you can’t really buy easily or are packaged in impractical ways. Hydrofluoric acid (HF, a glass etcher that is good at cleaning non-organic metal surfaces) sinks into your skin and poisons bones in minutes. There are organic solvents used in laboratories than make great equipment/glassware cleaners, but are absolutely bonkers if used outside lab or specific manufacturing spaces (semiconductor fabs use all kinds of nasty exotic liquids/gasses).