What makes a man want to marry? I think men don't want to marry anymore.

  • Registration closed, comedy forum, Internet drama, Sneed, etc.

Are you married or single on the Farms?


  • Total voters
    179

DocHoliday1977

Mentally Disabled Schizoposter
True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
Joined
Jul 16, 2018

8 facts about love and marriage in America
By A.W. Geiger and Gretchen Livingston

(Gary Friedman/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)
The landscape of relationships in America has shifted dramatically in recent decades. From cohabitation to same-sex marriage to interracial and interethnic marriage, here are eight facts about love and marriage in the United States.
1Half of Americans ages 18 and older were married in 2017, a share that has remained relatively stable in recent years but is down 8 percentage points since 1990. One factor driving this change is that Americans are staying single longer. The median age at first marriage had reached its highest point on record: 30 years for men and 28 years for women in 2018, according to the U.S. Census Bureau.
As the U.S. marriage rate has declined, divorce rates have increased among older Americans. In 2015, for every 1,000 married adults ages 50 and older, 10 had divorced – up from five in 1990. Among those ages 65 and older, the divorce rate roughly tripled since 1990.

2 Why get married? Love tops the list of Americans’ reasons to marry. About nine-in-ten Americans (88%) cited love as a very important reason to get married, ahead of making a lifelong commitment (81%) and companionship (76%), according to a 2013 Pew Research Center survey. Fewer said having their relationship recognized in a religious ceremony (30%), financial stability (28%) or legal rights and benefits (23%) were very important reasons to marry.
However, being a good financial provider was seen as particularly important for men to be a good husband or partner, according to a 2017 survey by the Center. About seven-in-ten adults (71%) said it was very important for a man to be able to support a family financially to be a good husband or partner, while just 32% said the same for a woman to be a good wife or partner.
As far as what helps people stay married, married adults said in a 2015 survey that having shared interests (64%) and a satisfying sexual relationship (61%) were very important to a successful marriage. More than half (56%) also named sharing household chores.
3The number of U.S. adults cohabiting with a partner is on the rise. In addition to the half of U.S. adults who were married, 7% were cohabiting in 2016. The number of Americans living with an unmarried partner reached about 18 million in 2016, up 29% since 2007. Roughly half of cohabiters are younger than 35 – but cohabitation is rising most quickly among Americans ages 50 and older.
Large majorities of Generation Zers, Millennials, Generation Xers and Baby Boomers say couples living together without being married doesn’t make a difference for our society, according to a 2019 Pew Research Center report. While 54% of those in the Silent Generation say cohabitation doesn’t make a difference in society, about four-in-ten (41%) say it is a bad thing, compared with much smaller shares among younger generations.
4 Four-in-ten new marriages involve remarriage Remarriage is on the rise. In 2013, 23% of married people had been married before, compared with just 13% in 1960. Four-in-ten new marriages in 2013 included a spouse who had said “I do” (at least) once before, and in 20% of new marriages both spouses had been married at least once before.
Remarriage is more common among men than women. Among previously married men (those who were ever divorced or widowed), 64% took a second walk down the aisle, compared with 52% of previously married women, according to a Pew Research Center analysis of 2013 Census Bureau data. One possible reason for this disparity is that women are less interested than men in remarrying. Among previously married women, 54% said in a 2014 Pew Research Center survey that they did not want to marry again, compared with 30% of men.
5
PST_2017.05.15.intermarriage-00-05.png
One-in-six newlyweds (17%) were married to someone of a different race or ethnicity in 2015.
This reflects a steady increase in intermarriage since 1967, when just 3% of newlyweds were intermarried, according to a 2017 Pew Research Center analysis.
While Asian (29%) and Hispanic (27%) newlyweds are most likely to intermarry in the U.S., the most dramatic increases in intermarriage have occurred among black newlyweds, 18% of whom married someone of a different race or ethnicity, up from 5% in 1980. About one-in-ten white newlyweds (11%) are married to someone of a different race or ethnicity.
Among both Gen Zers and Millennials, 53% say people of different races marrying each other is a good thing for our society, compared with 41% of Gen Xers, 30% of Boomers and 20% of those in the Silent Generation, according to the Center’s 2019 report.
6Support for the legalization of same-sex marriage has grown in the past 10 years. In 2007, Americans opposed legalizing same-sex marriage by a margin of 54% to 37%. In 2017, more favored (62%) than opposed (32%) allowing gays and lesbians to marry legally.
Surveys conducted by Gallup found that about one-in-ten LGBT Americans (10%) were married to a same-sex spouse in 2017. Now, a majority (61%) of all same-sex couples who live together are married.
7 About half of Gen Zers and Millennials say same-sex marriage, interracial marriage are good for society Millennials and Generation Z have been at the vanguard of changing views on same-sex marriage. About half of Gen Zers and Millennials say gay and lesbian couples being allowed to marry is a good thing for our society, while 33% of Gen Xers, 27% of Boomers and 18% of Silents say the same, according to the 2019 report.
8Sizable minorities of married people are members of a different religious group than their partner, but marriages and partnerships across political party lines are relatively rare. About four-in-ten Americans who have married since 2010 (39%) have a spouse who is in a different religious group, compared with only 19% of those who wed before 1960, according to a 2014 Pew Research Center survey. Many of these interfaith marriages are between Christians and those who are religiously unaffiliated.
When it comes to politics, a 2016 Pew Research Center survey found 77% of both Republicans and Democrats who were married or living with a partner said their spouse or partner was in the same party.
 

DocHoliday1977

Mentally Disabled Schizoposter
True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
Joined
Jul 16, 2018
I'm an older woman who preferred to stay single to avoid assholes, but my personal conviction is that is women incurs debt, they should own it and pay it.

I don't have the patience to be married to jerks either.

I've been married before. I honestly don't recommend it. Too easy for her to decide she doesn't want to work, fuck, or keep house, too easy for her to leave with half your shit (if you're lucky).

I agree with you partly, there's not enough "things" a woman actually contributes if she doesn't bring anything of value to the marriage. Of course if there are kids, that's different.
 

DocHoliday1977

Mentally Disabled Schizoposter
True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
Joined
Jul 16, 2018
If I truly loved a man , I would make an honest attempt to make it work. But I think men are mixed up on personal feelings of intimacy and monogamy. With men like Tony Robbins, Harvey Weinstein, and Jeffrey Epstein out there, the male contigent has been polluted with perverts.

But the same could be said for women too:

 

Fek

What could possibly go wrong?
True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
Joined
May 7, 2019
This strikes me as more of a Deep Thoughts topic. Either way - okay, I'll bite.

I'd wager the most widely applied (if optimistic) answer is something like "To have a family with a pleasant, sexy, respectful, and compatible woman." Beyond that or perhaps including the previous - to have a truly purposeful and fulfilling life.

To (attempt to) paraphrase the can of worms this issue opens:

I think there's an awful lot of animosity between the sexes (ie: it's not just men being affected) in the present day that just wasn't there prior to the last erm..well, probably 20ish years in particular. There are academics and other groups (even marketing techniques) trying desperately to destroy the family unit, and sadly an awful lot of young people are listening to them. You have people telling young women that their path to happiness not only lacks being happily married with kids, but that men are the root of all the evil women experience. Then you have people telling men that women are just a bunch of opportunists that won't ever really love them because muh hypergamy, so they better..<sigh>.."go their own way" and ignore women entirely (or at best, use them as cock sleeves and forget them just as quickly).

One side is pointing the finger at the other side pointing a finger right back their direction. It's a shame to watch happen even amongst people closer to my own age (ie: time to put up or shut up if you're gonna have healthy kids period). You gotta let that bullshit go, stop listening to people who don't have your best interests at heart, and be brave enough to put yourself out there and find someone. Don't be intimidated into apathy by a whole bunch of narcissists trying to justify their own wastes of life by getting anyone/everyone to follow in their childless, lonely, miserable footsteps.

Now, of course some people can be unmarried and single their whole lives (or after a bad divorce, etc) and claim it's the best thing ever. That's fine and well, but this is one arena where I really just cannot agree. I don't think the shit you own or the places you've been or the proverbial pipe you've laid, in the end, will matter as much as having a son/daughter/grandkids holding your hand as you finally close your eyes for good knowing you really hit it out of the park for them.

I have a feeling this is very quickly going to degenerate into a lot of sour attitudes (whether warranted or not) on this sort of thing. If you happen to feel that way, I urge you to do something to break the habit. Life's too short.
 

Damn Near

It's lovely to be here, thank you for having me
True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
Joined
Jan 6, 2015
I think women have been taught that manipulation and control is how a marriage works and can't show men real love.

You guys talk about banging the most women but if you had a woman who gave you real love and affection, you'd probably not go anywhere sexually.
that is a really twisted view of women
 

Niggernerd

Hiya pops, long time no post.
True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
Joined
Feb 24, 2019
Powerlevel: I just want to marry my girlfriend after a few more years and be by her side for the rest of my days fam.
She's cute,kind, funny and caring also we've already been through a lot so the relationship has been rock solid.

I think being overly clingy and over the top all the time can burn the candle faster people just need to take their time and not be exceptional about one flaw both have etc etc.
 

DocHoliday1977

Mentally Disabled Schizoposter
True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
Joined
Jul 16, 2018
Two marriage situations I've personally seen, the males were deviant with underage girls, bad parents, and the women were superficial. I would say both man and women were a match made in hell.

But both relationships are still together as far as i know.
 
Last edited:

Damn Near

It's lovely to be here, thank you for having me
True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
Joined
Jan 6, 2015
Two marriage situations I've personally seen, the males were deviant with underage girls, bad parents, and the women were superficial. I would say both man and women were a match made in hell.

But both relationships are still together as far as i know.
You can't use extreme outliers like that as examples of the norm
edit: I didn't realize you were a lolcow, but my point stands