What makes a man want to marry? I think men don't want to marry anymore.

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StraightShooter2

kiwifarms.net
Joined
Jul 10, 2020
Honestly, I see myself getting married one day. I've found myself discovering my romantic side as time goes on. I've failed out but I know I have the potential for it and the further I can get out of the incel and trad mindset, the healthier my view seems to get of the world as I see it's just another brand of bullshit.
"Incels and trads" are kind of like equally stupid polar opposites:

*Incel - far-leftist who wants Marxist / radical feminist ideology applied to sex - sex becomes a "right" or "entitlement" on par with food and water, and consent laws should be abolished (a la NAMBLA and "pedophile rights" groups)

*"Trad" - far-rightist who wants an arranged or child marriage the likes of what you see in impoverished, 3rd world parts of the world - and is stupid enough to think this was ever even "trad" to begin with, as opposed to a debatable "necessity" born out of poverty and survivalism, while also ignoring the reality that "men" of his ilk would have been just as low-status in a "trad" environment as they are in the developed world (such as how even the Bible talks about low-status men being turned into eunuch slaves and forced to serve in the king or queen's harem).
 

Never Scored

True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
Joined
Aug 21, 2019
I've never really considered that there was an alternative. My entire childhood I knew I was going to get a house and get married and have kids. I'm baffled that's not the case for everyone.
 

stares at error messages

kiwifarms.net
Joined
Dec 7, 2020

8 facts about love and marriage in America
By A.W. Geiger and Gretchen Livingston

(Gary Friedman/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)
The landscape of relationships in America has shifted dramatically in recent decades. From cohabitation to same-sex marriage to interracial and interethnic marriage, here are eight facts about love and marriage in the United States.
1Half of Americans ages 18 and older were married in 2017, a share that has remained relatively stable in recent years but is down 8 percentage points since 1990. One factor driving this change is that Americans are staying single longer. The median age at first marriage had reached its highest point on record: 30 years for men and 28 years for women in 2018, according to the U.S. Census Bureau.
As the U.S. marriage rate has declined, divorce rates have increased among older Americans. In 2015, for every 1,000 married adults ages 50 and older, 10 had divorced – up from five in 1990. Among those ages 65 and older, the divorce rate roughly tripled since 1990.

2 Why get married? Love tops the list of Americans’ reasons to marry. About nine-in-ten Americans (88%) cited love as a very important reason to get married, ahead of making a lifelong commitment (81%) and companionship (76%), according to a 2013 Pew Research Center survey. Fewer said having their relationship recognized in a religious ceremony (30%), financial stability (28%) or legal rights and benefits (23%) were very important reasons to marry.
However, being a good financial provider was seen as particularly important for men to be a good husband or partner, according to a 2017 survey by the Center. About seven-in-ten adults (71%) said it was very important for a man to be able to support a family financially to be a good husband or partner, while just 32% said the same for a woman to be a good wife or partner.
As far as what helps people stay married, married adults said in a 2015 survey that having shared interests (64%) and a satisfying sexual relationship (61%) were very important to a successful marriage. More than half (56%) also named sharing household chores.
3The number of U.S. adults cohabiting with a partner is on the rise. In addition to the half of U.S. adults who were married, 7% were cohabiting in 2016. The number of Americans living with an unmarried partner reached about 18 million in 2016, up 29% since 2007. Roughly half of cohabiters are younger than 35 – but cohabitation is rising most quickly among Americans ages 50 and older.
Large majorities of Generation Zers, Millennials, Generation Xers and Baby Boomers say couples living together without being married doesn’t make a difference for our society, according to a 2019 Pew Research Center report. While 54% of those in the Silent Generation say cohabitation doesn’t make a difference in society, about four-in-ten (41%) say it is a bad thing, compared with much smaller shares among younger generations.
4 Four-in-ten new marriages involve remarriage Remarriage is on the rise. In 2013, 23% of married people had been married before, compared with just 13% in 1960. Four-in-ten new marriages in 2013 included a spouse who had said “I do” (at least) once before, and in 20% of new marriages both spouses had been married at least once before.
Remarriage is more common among men than women. Among previously married men (those who were ever divorced or widowed), 64% took a second walk down the aisle, compared with 52% of previously married women, according to a Pew Research Center analysis of 2013 Census Bureau data. One possible reason for this disparity is that women are less interested than men in remarrying. Among previously married women, 54% said in a 2014 Pew Research Center survey that they did not want to marry again, compared with 30% of men.
5
PST_2017.05.15.intermarriage-00-05.png
One-in-six newlyweds (17%) were married to someone of a different race or ethnicity in 2015.
This reflects a steady increase in intermarriage since 1967, when just 3% of newlyweds were intermarried, according to a 2017 Pew Research Center analysis.
While Asian (29%) and Hispanic (27%) newlyweds are most likely to intermarry in the U.S., the most dramatic increases in intermarriage have occurred among black newlyweds, 18% of whom married someone of a different race or ethnicity, up from 5% in 1980. About one-in-ten white newlyweds (11%) are married to someone of a different race or ethnicity.
Among both Gen Zers and Millennials, 53% say people of different races marrying each other is a good thing for our society, compared with 41% of Gen Xers, 30% of Boomers and 20% of those in the Silent Generation, according to the Center’s 2019 report.
6Support for the legalization of same-sex marriage has grown in the past 10 years. In 2007, Americans opposed legalizing same-sex marriage by a margin of 54% to 37%. In 2017, more favored (62%) than opposed (32%) allowing gays and lesbians to marry legally.
Surveys conducted by Gallup found that about one-in-ten LGBT Americans (10%) were married to a same-sex spouse in 2017. Now, a majority (61%) of all same-sex couples who live together are married.
7 About half of Gen Zers and Millennials say same-sex marriage, interracial marriage are good for society Millennials and Generation Z have been at the vanguard of changing views on same-sex marriage. About half of Gen Zers and Millennials say gay and lesbian couples being allowed to marry is a good thing for our society, while 33% of Gen Xers, 27% of Boomers and 18% of Silents say the same, according to the 2019 report.
8Sizable minorities of married people are members of a different religious group than their partner, but marriages and partnerships across political party lines are relatively rare. About four-in-ten Americans who have married since 2010 (39%) have a spouse who is in a different religious group, compared with only 19% of those who wed before 1960, according to a 2014 Pew Research Center survey. Many of these interfaith marriages are between Christians and those who are religiously unaffiliated.
When it comes to politics, a 2016 Pew Research Center survey found 77% of both Republicans and Democrats who were married or living with a partner said their spouse or partner was in the same party.
  1. You post is projecting.
  2. You statistics are propaganda.
  3. You just want to get married to some schmuck, take his money, and run off with your black stud you actually want to have babies with the whole time.
  4. And that's all if you are not a trannie gay boi who is trying to straitcase.
 

Smolrolls

Headpats wanted, we're still here
kiwifarms.net
Joined
Aug 5, 2020
Since this thread is still alive, I've noticed people that don't get married, particularly women, in their 30's, 40's, and above act like they're still in high school with their boyfriends, hanging on to their "rape whistles", or they think their "still young".

Meanwhile you got some people in their 50's, 60's, whether they be husbands or wives, telling people how children are ungrateful, and to paraphrase, will stab you in the back, greedy, selfish, are carbon footprints etc... And some of them acting like their children too.

On one hand you can get married out of the fact that you don't want to be alone, and for the fact your not deluding yourself your getting yougner (Also think about the fate of the *insert* race). On the other hand, you might marry someone whose parents think they're parasites in their lives and ruined said parents youth lets say, thus thinking children are also trash and may treat your kids accordingly. And not to mention women who act nice on the outside but are literal bitches who'll drain you for all your worth. Or a husband who act nice on the outside but has a fragile ego, a violent temper or a weak man who lashes out against his family because he can't lash out against say his crap co-workers, crap boss, and crap job.
 
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NeoGAF Lurker

An Niggo
kiwifarms.net
Joined
Aug 15, 2016
I’m a newlywed and my wife is pregnant with our first child. So we’ll see how it goes.

I had to search pretty hard to find a hot girl who was marriage material. I found her though. She makes her own clothes, loves gardening, is an artist, wants four or five kids, and very close with her family. I did make some sacrifices: I got rid of all my vidya, I do stuff I don’t like such as going to rodeos, and rarely eat out (we generally cook together). These are all positive changes so I’m fine with it.

Had to go through a lot of hay to find this needle though. I’d say it’s better to stay single than marry someone you’re not 100% about.
 

The Curmudgeon

True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
Joined
Dec 16, 2019
I’m a newlywed and my wife is pregnant with our first child. So we’ll see how it goes.

I had to search pretty hard to find a hot girl who was marriage material. I found her though. She makes her own clothes, loves gardening, is an artist, wants four or five kids, and very close with her family. I did make some sacrifices: I got rid of all my vidya, I do stuff I don’t like such as going to rodeos, and rarely eat out (we generally cook together). These are all positive changes so I’m fine with it.

Had to go through a lot of hay to find this needle though. I’d say it’s better to stay single than marry someone you’re not 100% about.
Congratulations! I hope you have a long, happy marriage! :)

For those of you who are married or want to get married, I respect your choice. Just like how I know I wouldn't be a good father, I know I also wouldn't be a good husband. I like the idea of being in a happy marriage, but my personality isn't right for that. I'm too selfish. I'm also too toxic and eccentric to be a good husband. I really don't like the idea of sacrificing my own hobbies and interests for someone else. I know that means I'll be alone, but I'm okay with that. I don't want to end up like my parents. I don't want to end up being yet another divorce statistic either.

I don't see myself as a victim though. That's just the way it is!
 

Fek

What could possibly go wrong?
True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
Joined
May 7, 2019
I’m a newlywed and my wife is pregnant with our first child. So we’ll see how it goes.

I had to search pretty hard to find a hot girl who was marriage material. I found her though. She makes her own clothes, loves gardening, is an artist, wants four or five kids, and very close with her family. I did make some sacrifices: I got rid of all my vidya, I do stuff I don’t like such as going to rodeos, and rarely eat out (we generally cook together). These are all positive changes so I’m fine with it.

Had to go through a lot of hay to find this needle though. I’d say it’s better to stay single than marry someone you’re not 100% about.
That is such good news. I'm genuinely happy for you. :semperfi:
 

Utilitarian Clit Dick

kiwifarms.net
Joined
Nov 3, 2020
The ONLY reason would be to provide a two parent household for any children you might have - scientifically understood to be the best way of doing things. Marriage being a necessity if only for the reason that any good woman wouldn't let you let off a live round inside her without that kind of commitment.

If I were a fag, turbo hedonistic or incel beyond salvation, I wouldn't give a single fuck about it whatsoever.