What would happen to a child if the only books you read to them were more complex? -

Aaa0aaa0

internet sticker enthusiast
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Even if you find that one out of 100 kids that understand what you were teaching them, I am pretty sure that kid would end up like this:
076bd21b64a9c650e6c3470e3b9763c04bbb671abd434a12558a97b9a42176a4.jpg
 

Sage In All Fields

πr8 of the $777Cs
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most of the complex books that children read before say fantasy novels and comic books will have the child go through phases and backtalk towards authority. if you force children to pay attention to said “complex” books, he’ll just go back to doing what children do: ACT LIKE CHILDREN
I don't think you need to do any forcing, children are naturally curious unless you have school beat it out of them. They might not care for one book but maybe they'll care for another, you just have to give them variety.
 

Prophetic Spirit

Definitely not a Kyoshi Warrior
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Nah, kids can't understand how a fallen prince traveled to the world searching for a specific person, killed people to save his own and later failing promises to deep down in his own rabbid hole.
At least there's a happy ending in the end of that but kids either gonna be scared or boring earlier
 

furūtsu

Quality Winx Content Appreciator
kiwifarms.net
Assuming that kid isn't a one in a million child genius, they'll get bored and resent you for not letting them just play Xbox like all the other kids.

I kid. I think it's important to give kids quality material to read, but most won't understand Tolstoy or Dostoevsky. Start off small, like The Hobbit, and help them work their way up. Also make sure you ask them questions and encourage them to do the same, make them think about the broader concepts and apply them to their own lives.
 
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Bad Gateway

Oops!
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I don't know what exactly to search for to get actual science on this, or if there even is any science on this, but presumably there was a time when 'children's literature' wasn't really a genre and they would have to learn to read from regular books? If this is the case how might that impact a child's development?

I'm wondering if when I have kids I should avoid exposing them to 'children's literature' because I'm wondering if it may in fact be contributing to people growing up to be really illiterate.
What do you mean you don't know what to search to find out about this?

Every university in the fucking world offers degrees in both early childhood and elementary education. There are hundreds of years of research from every developed country in the world on this topic. Entire fields of dedicated study which cross multiple disciplines. You don't even know what you're asking. That's not what "illiterate" means. Work on that first, then worry about the reading comprehension of the kids you'll never have.
 

Haim Arlosoroff

Archpolitician June Lapincal
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If this is the case how might that impact a child's development?

I'm wondering if when I have kids I should avoid exposing them to 'children's literature' because I'm wondering if it may in fact be contributing to people growing up to be really illiterate.
Read them aesop's fables (the townsend translation is the best), and Fairy Tales Told for Children(by Hans Christian Andersen). Think of knowledge as a tree, the trunk is their birth knowledge, the branches are the things like walking and language that nature primes in us to learn, the twigs are words and little facts, and the leaves are the associations we make about them. When confronted in life by a problem, we try to associate it to things we know, then we use facts and ideas we've learned, and our confidence is found by our certainty that we are at least grasping the right branch of our knowledge. In other words, you must teach the opposite way from general to specific that your child will then use specific to general for the rest of their lives.

I for one, read far to much sci-fi such as Dune, ender's game, war of the worlds, hitchhikers guide to the galaxy, and Protector (a 1973 book by Larry Niven) and it gave me the gift of wild points-of-view which allowed me to see the different subjectivities of people who counter my way of thinking which got me into psychology and politics.

Ultimately, books exist to show children different ways of living to what they immediately see. Most of all people vastly vastly overestimate in their personal parenting how much their child learns from speaking to them versus showing them. They learn by watching, far more than being told. But books can spark their active imagination, which effects them as if they are watching a real thing, rather than instruction manual reading which only is retained short-term or as politeness/correct behavior.

In the very short, anything which they actively watch in reality or which promotes new ideas that engage their imagination is best. Expose them to much, double down on as many things as stick, and you'll have a thoughtful child that might be more of a handful once their imagination lets them plot and plan since you primed it so much. Intelligence can be a curse, it can get you into trouble.

Here's some good bedtime reading ages 4-6
I'm picturing a child with Julius Evola, Søren Kierkegaard, Fyodor Dostoevsky, Jean-Paul Sartre, Friedrich Nietzsche, Arthur Schopenhauer, Sigmund Freud, or G. W. Leibniz rattling around their head. That would be one horrible child to let talk around strangers.
 
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Bad Gateway

Oops!
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You should inform the world of your mind-reading abilities.
I'm wondering if when I have kids I should avoid exposing them to 'children's literature' because I'm wondering if it may in fact be contributing to people growing up to be really unable to read and write.

I'm wondering if when I have kids I should avoid exposing them to 'children's literature' because I'm wondering if it may in fact be contributing to people growing up to be really lacking education.

I'm wondering if when I have kids I should avoid exposing them to 'children's literature' because I'm wondering if it may in fact be contributing to people growing up to be really lacking in literary and linguistic cultural knowledge.

I'm wondering if when I have kids I should avoid exposing them to 'children's literature' because I'm wondering if it may in fact be contributing to people growing up to be really lacking knowledge in a field I won't specify.
 

Sage In All Fields

πr8 of the $777Cs
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I'm wondering if when I have kids I should avoid exposing them to 'children's literature' because I'm wondering if it may in fact be contributing to people growing up to be really unable to read and write.

I'm wondering if when I have kids I should avoid exposing them to 'children's literature' because I'm wondering if it may in fact be contributing to people growing up to be really lacking education.

I'm wondering if when I have kids I should avoid exposing them to 'children's literature' because I'm wondering if it may in fact be contributing to people growing up to be really lacking in literary and linguistic cultural knowledge.

I'm wondering if when I have kids I should avoid exposing them to 'children's literature' because I'm wondering if it may in fact be contributing to people growing up to be really lacking knowledge in a field I won't specify.
Case in point
 

AMERICA

GET A LIFE, SO WHAT IF I AM ATTRACTED TO Pokémon!!
True & Honest Fan
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Bilingual children take a bit longer to pick up both languages as children; they test at lower levels than monolingual children until a certain point where they then become indistinguishable in skill. It delays language development but does not prevent or hinder it.*

If you read the child books that are overly complex, I wonder if you'd have a similar situation, where it takes the child longer to pick up the language, but they even out to where they "should" be later, probably beyond.

*i learned this so long ago that i wonder if this is still the "modern" idea of how things work; take with a grain of salt
 

Fliddaroonie

I'm a spooky ghost! Whooooo!!! Ectoplasm!!!!
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I'm not sure about reading books way above your child's age or level. But I can for sure see the benefit on talking to them properly. Not using idiotic baby talk, and talking to them even when they're non verbal is a great thing. Answering their questions honestly, admitting when you dont know an answer by looking it up and finding it out is no bad thing.

And if I can? Never, ever shout or show anger when questions are asked. Ever. Because if you want your kids to come to you for answers then that's how you put them off.


Edit: and ffs, don't infantalise stuff. I've lost count of the number of grown ass women who cant distinguished between their vagina and their vulva and instead call the foofoos or twinkle
Apt names for things are not something to be scared of.
 
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Ramuchan

kiwifarms.net
I don't know what exactly to search for to get actual science on this, or if there even is any science on this, but presumably there was a time when 'children's literature' wasn't really a genre and they would have to learn to read from regular books? If this is the case how might that impact a child's development?

I'm wondering if when I have kids I should avoid exposing them to 'children's literature' because I'm wondering if it may in fact be contributing to people growing up to be really illiterate.
Coming from the school system, I think that kids would actually turn out much better if they went straight to mature genres. I know you've probably seen 4 year olds play Beethoven or 10 year olds solving rubik's cubes in a matter of seconds. Point is kid's minds are very flexible at a young age, basically mature in the sense that intellect is strongest. I don't know if we would enjoy books to the point that they would rival other means of modern entertainment, but if they are given to kids at young ages and glorified like fortnite, we might see a world where school is all about science, and writing and reading are common hobbies among teens. Essentially we'd see something along the lines of a mass Doki Doki Literature Club.
 

L50LasPak

We have all the time in the world.
kiwifarms.net
This has been done. Over and over again. It always turns out the same. If you overload a kid with knowledge from a young age, they become drastically antisocial and reclusive, with strange fixations to match their intellect. You do get an adult who by all possible measures is undeniably brilliant, but they are mysteriously nonfunctional, completely nervous wrecks who loathe human contact and lose all interest in putting their knowledge to any use.

I wonder what they know that we don't.

William J Sidis is perhaps the most dramatic example, but there are plenty of others.
 
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