Whiskey - It's the water of life!

Tomatin Legacy, also known as Tomatin Dualchas in the USA.

Bottled at 43% ABV, aged in used bourbon and virgin oak barrels, probably uncoloured, and I have no idea if it's chill-filtered. It's a pretty cheap single malt, I can buy it for less than JW Black (which I like quite a lot) or Chivas Regal (which puts bland in blended whisky), it's a good bargain in my opinion.

Both the cardboard box and the bottle label carry tasting notes which I found to be accurate. I smell faint vanilla, a bit overpowered by apple, lemon, and pineapple. Similarly, while there's a definite sweetness to its taste, I feel the sourness of apples, lemons, and pineapples is stronger, and it has the bitter aftertaste of pine. Taste mostly what you smell.
It's not very complicated, but there are layers to the taste, and the slightly higher than average alcohol content helps, too.

I think this will make a great whisky for hot summer days, with or without an ice cube. Probably without, since I like the undiluted taste very much.

Lastly, bottle and box design. I found their old line a bit too cold and "professional". These shorter, plumper bottles and pastel-coloured boxes feel friendlier, more attractive to me, even if I don't exactly agree with their motto "The Softer Side of the Highlands".

Try it if you want something to "just drink". It's certainly cheap without being actually cheap shit.

I'm going to try their older expressions, the bourbon/port matured 14yro and the limited, 12 yro amontilado finished 2006 sound particularly exciting.
 
While Corona-chan hadn't kissed me yet, the constant news are driving me crazy.
Losing a lot of my sanity points, I decided to try blending some whisky using this short "guide".

I'll mix one deciliter of Glenfarclas 105 with one deciliter of Tomatin Legacy, have them sit for three weeks, and see what happens. My goal is to give the Tomatin some depth, some punch, and have the Glenfarclas become a bit lighter and crisper. I guess. I might even post a photo or two.
 
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neverendingmidi

it just goes on and on and on and on...
kiwifarms.net
Has anybody tried this yet?
7E811C5A-C3A0-45A2-A5DF-BBE0E9BFACC2.jpeg

It's aged in cognac barrels. I just wonder if the cognac overwhelms the scotch? I've had good bourbons that have been aged in casks used by other liquors, but Glenlivet has such a light taste I'd worry it would be overpowered.

Then again I'm also not a fan of cognac. The stuff I tried tasted like alcoholic raisin juice. Seriously, I tasted it and immediately thought of Sunmaid.
 
Has anybody tried this yet?
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It's aged in cognac barrels. I just wonder if the cognac overwhelms the scotch? I've had good bourbons that have been aged in casks used by other liquors, but Glenlivet has such a light taste I'd worry it would be overpowered.

Then again I'm also not a fan of cognac. The stuff I tried tasted like alcoholic raisin juice. Seriously, I tasted it and immediately thought of Sunmaid.
It's exclusive to the USA, so I haven't had it. Whiskey Exchange doesn't carry it, Master of Malt doesn't ship to most of Europe, so I won't have it for some time. Anyway, according to this press release, only the finish was done in cognac casks, regular aging was done in the usual American ex-bourbon casks and first-fill sherry casks. Glenlivet's site confirms this. The cognac finish will put a twist on the base whisky rather than overpower it.

First update on my unholy concoction:

comparison.jpg

Glenfarclas 105 in a Four Roses Single Barrel bottle on the left (time to transfer it again), Tomatin on the right (time to transfer it for the first time), blend in the center. Next update in a week.
 
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