Why do so many people these days tie their sense of self-worth to fictional media? - The phenomenon of consooming man children

Lensherr

kiwifarms.net
As most of us I’m sure are aware of via the Consoomer meme:

1599522887211.jpeg


there’s a ubiquitous modern phenomenon of adult men and women who invest a tremendous amount of time and money in a fictional universe to the point where their identity largely revolves around being a consumer of whatever IP or IPs are prevalent at the time. This primarily happens with large, sprawling corporate-owned franchises like Star Wars, Star Trek, Harry Potter, Game Of Thrones, and both the Marvel and DC pantheon of superheroes to name a few.

Now, there’s nothing wrong with enjoying any of these franchises (or fiction in general) in and of itself. However, I’m not talking about people who occasionally go to see a superhero movie with their friends in their spare time. Rather, I’m talking about those who are so heavily invested in these properties that they tie their entire sense of self-worth to it. We see this manifest in, among other things, the constant dick-measuring contests that they have as to who owns the most disposable plastic crap and the extreme, over-the-top emotional reactions that they have to movie trailers:


(On the flip side, we have people having mental breakdowns whenever these franchises release entries that suck)

So how did it come to this? How did this low to middle-brow nerd pop culture stuff become like a religion to these people. Well, I have a few theories, and they aren’t mutually exclusive:

1. The receding influence of actual religion. Because fewer people are religious in the sense that they adhere to one of the five major religions in the western world, they have supplanted it with the aforementioned pop-culture, thus filling the void for the sense of meaning and guiding wisdom that religion used to fill.

2. Lack of meaningful connection to history and culture. As people have started to become deracinated, rootless cosmopolitans, they attach themselves to these corporate IPs as a means of getting invested in some sort of history (i.e., lore/canon), albeit a fictional one, as opposed to real-world history and heritage.

3. Corporate marketing. Basically, the corporations that produce this pop culture have become very adept at exploiting the fanatical devotion of and emotionally manipulating these consumers. Ultimately, they don’t care about quality as long as they can keep milking their consumer base of enough money to make a profit. In other words, they encourage the unhealthy, all-consuming obsessing that people have with these IPs, because after all, healthy, well-adjusted people don’t spend hundreds of dollars on Star Wars toys.

Do you guys think that any of these hypotheses are accurate, or do you have your own theories as to how the phenomenon I’m describing came about? And how can we, as a society, wean ourself off of this obsession with corporate franchises that primarily exist to make money off us?

Endnotes:
Two videos that I recommend that go further into detail on/cover similar ground as to what I’m talking about are ‘The Infantilization Of Popular Culture’ by Paul Joseph Watson and ‘What could replace nerd culture?’ by Endeavour:


 

Icasaracht

You're all fags and I am your lighter.
kiwifarms.net
Because it distracts us from the meaninglessness of existence. Fictional worlds mean nothing, and neither does anything else. In less than 100 years every single member of this forum will be dead and forgotten. The universe will carry on for trillions of years until the last star dies leaving an empty meaningless void.
Wubba lubba dub dub.
 

The Fool

True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
Because it distracts us from the meaninglessness of existence. Fictional worlds mean nothing, and neither does anything else. In less than 100 years every single member of this forum will be dead and forgotten. The universe will carry on for trillions of years until the last star dies leaving an empty meaningless void.
That's a reason to generally enjoy fictional media, you edgy pseudo-intellectual faggot. He's asking why people base their entire personalities around a specific IP.

It's definitely something to do with their lack of a personality. I always just assumed because they have no personality, no real unique ideas of their own, no ability to have any sort of introspective thoughts, that they try to find those things elsewhere. How many of these people love spurting "deep" quotes or life lessons from Star Wars and Harry Potter? They need to find these things in media because they don't know how to find it themselves. It's why they're all so boring and similar (and why kids call them NPCs).
 

RejectedLynx

kiwifarms.net
It's definitely something to do with their lack of a personality. I always just assumed because they have no personality, no real unique ideas of their own, no ability to have any sort of introspective thoughts, that they try to find those things elsewhere. How many of these people love spurting "deep" quotes or life lessons from Star Wars and Harry Potter? They need to find these things in media because they don't know how to find it themselves. It's why they're all so boring and similar (and why kids call them NPCs).
Basically this. Whatever the reason is, they never think on their own and make their own personalities so they have to find someone to emulate since they want to be emulated and coveted. It's really not that deep because they're not that deep, sadly.
 

The Fool

True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
Allow me to follow up with a somewhat related question? Why do these same types of people always have to compare their political boogeymen (for lack of a better term) to fictional characters. And then follow it up by comparing themselves to the characters that defeat said villain? Are the heroes of real world history not flawless enough for their liking?
That's not complex either. They spend a lot of time thinking about their IP of choice, more than real-world events and history. So they draw more connections between current events and their IP of choice. Everyone does it, in fact I bet a lot of us do it. We just don't autistically spurt it out in the open because we're self-aware enough to realize that comparing current events to fictional media makes us sounds like we're 9 years old.
 

The Shadow

Edgy two gun mystery man
kiwifarms.net
If my self worth was tied to the comics I follow I'd have been institutionalized about halfway through Tom King's Batman run. The modern geek hates to admit that sometimes a franchise you like sucks. You have to be a brand zealot or you're not a true and honest fan.

The healthy thing to do is just shake your head and move on.
 

Fandom Trash

Cutest Dumpster Cat around
kiwifarms.net
That's a reason to generally enjoy fictional media, you edgy pseudo-intellectual faggot. He's asking why people base their entire personalities around a specific IP.

It's definitely something to do with their lack of a personality. I always just assumed because they have no personality, no real unique ideas of their own, no ability to have any sort of introspective thoughts, that they try to find those things elsewhere. How many of these people love spurting "deep" quotes or life lessons from Star Wars and Harry Potter? They need to find these things in media because they don't know how to find it themselves. It's why they're all so boring and similar (and why kids call them NPCs).

I think its this too. People get so attached to fictional shows that they think its quirky to quote Harry Potter nonstop or show everyone their latest rick and morty tattoos.

And when things don't go their way (like in terms of a ship becoming canon or a character doing something that might not match with their personality) these very same people get angry and attack the creators.

Instead of writing stories that involves what they want, they would rather sit, consume and complain.
 

Nekromantik2

Living dead girl
True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
During the 80s and 90s there was a lot of commercials targeted to kids. Toy commercials every where, just say Crossfire and someone remembers that stupid commercial. Toys R Us, "I don't want to grow up", Chunky E Cheese, "Where a kid can be a kid, Trix are for kids, you get the idea. Now Toy commercials are nothing new, they've been around as far back as radio, but this was different. There was also this thing with kids outsmarting adults all the time in movies and TV. Adults just don't get it, blah blah blah. You had Latchkey kids, kids that get back from school to an empty house and don't ever go outside because of stranger danger. They spend hours watching TV, internalizing all of this, screaming at their parents for the new Transformers toy that just came out because they feel they need it or they're not cool. These are the kids that didn't really have friends because they just wanted to stay inside all day watching cartoons. They ate this up, it became their personality because they had nothing else.


They grew up, physically any way. They're still that lonely kid wasting time watching TV eating junk, they happiest memories that they have from childhood are when they got a new plastic toy that they only played with for half a hour before forgetting. They never matured mentally so they stick to the easy to digest joys of childhood. That's why they get so upset when a cartoon is rebooted or when an author that they loved says there are only 2 genders. They've held on to this identity of childhood good adult bad, and any thing that challenges that like say a reboot of the Thundercats attacks their identity.

They still think that they're that smart ass kid that adults just don't get, and they're cool, but really they're a sad sack that almost 40 with nothing to show for it but a bunch of plastic used to fill an empty home.
 

Pissmaster

True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
Allow me to follow up with a somewhat related question? Why do these same types of people always have to compare their political boogeymen (for lack of a better term) to fictional characters. And then follow it up by comparing themselves to the characters that defeat said villain? Are the heroes of real world history not flawless enough for their liking?
We're all exposed to fictional characters a hell of a lot more than historical (or biblical) ones, so they're a lot more familiar.

The modern geek hates to admit that sometimes a franchise you like sucks. You have to be a brand zealot or you're not a true and honest fan.
I've run into that a hell of a lot more than I'd ever like to admit. There's a weird ordeal in nerd culture where you can make friends with someone through being fans of a franchise, really get along great, and then have them act like you're betraying them when you're disappointed in the next thing from the franchise, or even if you're just drifting off onto another thing. Which leads to some of the gayest fucking friendship breakups imaginable.
 

Next Task

True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
The obvious answer is autism.

If my self worth was tied to the comics I follow I'd have been institutionalized about halfway through Tom King's Batman run. The modern geek hates to admit that sometimes a franchise you like sucks.
I think that's only one half of it. Being a geek means being passionate. So there's the ones who will defend their preferred area against all criticism. But there's also the ones who hate what their beloved franchise has turned into and can only complain about how much they hate it while still watching.

Much, but not all, of which comes from fans who always automatically hate the new stuff. Some of these consumers define themselves by how everything new in their 'beloved' media is shit, but the point where everything became terrible is always moving. They can't ever appreciate new content, and seem to take pride in that, even if later the stuff they profess to hate will be the high point the new content disgraces with its very existence.
 

Austrian Conscript 1915

I have 99 problems
kiwifarms.net
Glad to see my comrade and "nigga" endeavour gaining more popularity.
Anyways, I think this whole thing is a bit over exaggerated. Of course these man children exist in real life, but they aren't that pervasive. Everyone to some extent participates on pop culture. I'm sure that everyone in this thread saw avengers infinity war within the first month of its release. The difference between normal people and them is that their primary source of entertainment and hobby comes from pop culture, while most normal people have a mix of pop culture and more niche things as well as having hobbies which are completely distinct from that entertainment like carpentry. The consooomers on the other hand have everything invested into that culture, even their hobbies.

The way we end this is destroying America. Death to America, long live Iran. RIP Suleimani. I bear witness that there is no deity but God, I bear witness that Muhammad is the messenger of God, and I bear witness that Ali is the vicegerent of God.
 

Nekromantik2

Living dead girl
True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
Much, but not all, of which comes from fans who always automatically hate the new stuff. Some of these consumers define themselves by how everything new in their 'beloved' media is shit, but the point where everything became terrible is always moving. They can't ever appreciate new content, and seem to take pride in that, even if later the stuff they profess to hate will be the high point the new content disgraces with its very existence.
It really is a stupid mindset, just because they do a remake doesn't mean that the old material is gone forever. And you never know if the new take on something could be great, John Carpenter's The Thing is seen as one of the greatest horror movies of the 80s.

I don't think that these type of people are that numerous, they just seem that way because you always see them online. That's because they're always online. Places like Reddit and Twitter are the only places they get any social interaction.
 
Tags
None