Why does Linux suck? -

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kiwifarms.net
I installed it when my windows went poop and I regretted it later because I was a dumbass and couldn't figure anything out. Had to get someone to reinstall Windows for me. It's embarrassing that I spend basically me entire life on computers but know fuck all about them
Unless you jumped into trying to use Arch Linux right off the bat. (and even then...), there's basically no excuse for not being able to figure stuff out if you can read
 
Because some times on the spur of the moment I want to play a vidya game, It sucks bad enough on windows where I have to download patches for 30 minutes before my game boots but at least it does boot. On Linux every time it's 5 hours of troubleshooting then downloading a patch then I find the moment has past and I no longer want to play vidya.
 

Some JERK

I ain't drunk, I'm just drinkin'
kiwifarms.net
Device manufacturers are getting better about writing drivers for Linux but it's still iffy sometimes. There are also programs that don't have a Linux version and don't have a comparable Linux alternative. Compiling a program from source can be impossible sometimes if your gcc version isnt the exact version that the source wants, and that exact version isnt compatable with your installation.

These are minor complaints but they can be annoying. On balance Linux is great for a lot of roles.
 

EthanDude

I cannot go through this again.......
kiwifarms.net
Btw I'm not hating on linux. It seems like a perfectly viable and good option. I'm just talking about my personal experiences. Totally subjective, nothing more.
 

Neigh

Glue factory enthusiast
kiwifarms.net
Using linux requires a change in the way you use a computer and, depending on the distribution, learning parts of linux aside from the GUI. I think people are more harsh in their judgements of linux because of their growing up with Windows and its problems. People should not expect Linux to run software written for Windows, especially video games. I have been using linux as my main operating system for over a decade and linux has come a long way in terms of usability. While I can use Windows, Linux allows me such an extreme degree of customization and scripting that my productivity is poorer on Windows. I think people have had technology abstracted away so much that people are missing out on learning skills to help their lives and instead are using devices and software that are the equivalent of toddler toys.
People need to not expect a windows clone when trying it and understand Linux isn't one operating system but the core of many.
 

Cuntflaps

kiwifarms.net
No split between the base system and local.
The system-d fiasco.
Its users who write fsck for fuck.
The almost completely random standards/conventions for the locations of files.
* My thoughts on systemd are kind of mixed, to be honest. In the before time, systemd wasn't as widely used and wasn't very stable. You were better off with distros that used more traditional init in my opinion. However, we now have excellent distros that use systemd by default, like Arch--and the distros that benefited from the simplicity of foregoing systemd (in my case more specifically Slackware and later Gentoo) are more or less obsolete in their own ways. However, I still have yet to spend any time learning the internals of systemd. And if something is wrong with a unit, for example, I might just be kind of fucked. Whereas back in the day, even a relatively frightening failure in bringing up a service or what have you could usually be fixed with a bit of shell scripting knowledge. But let's be honest: that's my fault, and every problem I've had since switching to a systemd-based distribution has been solved by configuration changes completely unrelated to systemd itself.

* As for standardizing file locations, yes 100%. This has gotten a million times better over the past decade or so, but it really is still a massive irritation at times.

* The Linux community has always and will always be the worst part of Linux.
 

Neigh

Glue factory enthusiast
kiwifarms.net
* My thoughts on systemd are kind of mixed, to be honest. In the before time, systemd wasn't as widely used and wasn't very stable. You were better off with distros that used more traditional init in my opinion. However, we now have excellent distros that use systemd by default, like Arch--and the distros that benefited from the simplicity of foregoing systemd (in my case more specifically Slackware and later Gentoo) are more or less obsolete in their own ways. However, I still have yet to spend any time learning the internals of systemd. And if something is wrong with a unit, for example, I might just be kind of fucked. Whereas back in the day, even a relatively frightening failure in bringing up a service or what have you could usually be fixed with a bit of shell scripting knowledge. But let's be honest: that's my fault, and every problem I've had since switching to a systemd-based distribution has been solved by configuration changes completely unrelated to systemd itself.
I personally think systemd is a better init system for enterprise and "normie" use. Instead of trying to write init scripts and use a sysvinit startup tool, you can create human readable unit files, run systemctl to control startup, and read service logs(including systemd errors for said service) using journalctl. You don't need to decipher bash script or look online for examples. There are valid concerns like systemd's violation of GNU's "keep is simple" principle, Pottering's control/influence, and its size.
It has gotten to the point where I think most of the drama in the linux community is from people who barely use or know linux as described in the video below. Linux software projects and distros are like sports teams to them.
* The Linux community has always and will always be the worst part of Linux.
At least if you search for an issue, you will get at least one answer on stack exchange or a forum, though the Windows "community" likely has fewer trannies.
 
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buttman87

kiwifarms.net
Linux isn't hard to learn just dont start with a shit distro like arch. I first installed Debian 5 years ago and haven't booted windows since. At first I missed the games but I just stopped playing them. I can still play minecraft, dwarf fortress and hellmoo so I don't really care.

The random standards for file/config locations is a bitch but it's really only a few retarded programs, like systemd. Why the FUCK are service files in 2 places? Some are in /lib/systemd/system and some are in /etc/, why dont you just put them all in etc like every other init system.
What really make me stop using systemd is systemd-resolved. I needed to get around a web filter and the solution I chose was to use dnscrypt since I didn't want to pay for a vpn. I could NOT get it to stop sending dns queries to fucking google. Turns out google dns is hard coded as a fallback resolver so if dnscrypt-proxy hadn't started yet it would just start sending shit to google. NIGGA WTF! Even blocking outgoing port 53 with ufw didn't always work. Maybe I'm just a retard but I installed void which uses runit as the init system and I've never had these problems, the config files are simpler too.

I'm currently using fartix which I was hesitant to install at first since I had a bad experience with arch but I haven't had any problems and it all just works.
I used arch for a few months and the "pacman -Syu broke x" meme isn't a joke. Every time I would update something new broke. I remember one time every python package broke because the permissions to some directory weren't writable anymore. Eventually I figured it out and chmod 777 rather than finding what the real problem is but then next update it changes back, FUCK YOU! pacman would also overwrite my configs sometimes, which really pisses me off. I know this is probably a problem with the package not the distro itself but this happened multiple times and it's literally never happened on any other distro.

I do hate the elitist faggot community but who cares, there's still plenty of people willing to give real answers to your problems. On sites like stackexchange the good answers usually end up at the top and the garbage "why are you even using this just install x" type comments get downvoted

But really, if all you do is shitpost and play games just use windows. or go outside or something
 

Cuntflaps

kiwifarms.net
I personally think systemd is a better init system for enterprise and "normie" use. Instead of trying to write init scripts and use a sysvinit startup tool, you can create human readable unit files, run systemctl to control startup, and read service logs(including systemd errors for said service) using journalctl. You don't need to decipher bash script or look online for examples. There are valid concerns like systemd's violation of GNU's "keep is simple" principle, Pottering's control/influence, and its size.
It has gotten to the point where I think most of the drama in the linux community is from people who barely use or know linux as described in the video below. Linux software projects and distros are like sports teams to them.

At least if you search for an issue, you will get at least one answer on stack exchange or a forum, though the Windows "community" likely has fewer trannies.
These days I think I would agree with you pretty broadly. I only became a systemd "user" a few years back when moving to Arch, but I've legitimately never had an issue in that time which wasn't totally unrelated to the aspects of systemd I actually interact with. Not exactly a huge amount of experience, but a few years using a given piece of software without it causing problems is pretty damn good by my usability standards. But in fairness, systemd does a lot and the extent of my interaction with systemd is limited. I only need to worry about basic functions: managing services, setting some config options, mounting a few remote shares on boot, and I also use systemd-boot.

As far as communities go, you definitely might be on to something. It's annoying to watch kids argue about distros and shit on the web, but legitimately useful resources actually exist. With Windows you have that MS forum where people just paste spam as "solutions" to problems--and it's always the same shit. "Download this random utility Microsoft released to fix this specific problem which has <1% chance of working."
 

tehpope

My Face Everyday | Archivist
True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net

linux is good but i like my vidya gaems so i have to run windows anyway, and im too lazy to bother setting up and managing more than one OS on my machine
Vidya runs fine on Linux. Valve has done a ton of legwork with Proton. And older games (pre 2010) run fine with Lutris and Wine.
 

Deathclaw Tiddehs

It's a thankless job, but someone has got to do it
kiwifarms.net
Vidya runs fine on Linux. Valve has done a ton of legwork with Proton. And older games (pre 2010) run fine with Lutris and Wine.
For the most part, yeah. But some DRM and anti-cheat just doesn't play well with Linux at all, mainly those draconian kernel-level bullshit that cumsoomers are happy to have on their system. For folks that enjoy indie or older titles that have had their draconian DRM removed, you're not really going to be affected. But for people who want to play a game that is AAA and has come out in the past year/two, you're SOL if it uses BattlEye, EAC, or Denuvo. Nvidia drivers are still weird as hell when it comes to Linux, too. Some people (like me) have no/minimal problems and can get things like Hashcat working right out of the box. Though, now I'm in the ballpark of "Hashcat doesn't work for me" ever since I upgraded from a 10 series card to a 30 series card. Other people get super unstable installs that just don't work right, even with a blood sacrifice. I wouldn't say Linux is a bad experience for gaming. It does have benefits, but you are probably going to have to put in research to get things working and some stuff just will never work.

I definitely run both Linux and Windows. My computer used to be a dual-boot system, but I ended up switching to Windows with a Linux VM because it is more secure and snapshots are MVP if you or an update goes full retard. Speaking of updates, I really like how you can update Linux without a reboot. It's very cool. I wish Microsoft would take some of the Linux philosophy of NOT tracking everything I do. And maybe Microsoft could hire a graphic designer to make their user interface not clash with itself constantly. And I've had my Windows install shit the bed from updates way more than Linux but I'm still paranoid Linux will do it.

Maybe I just really hate Windows and I can deal with the weird Linux quirks because Linux doesn't try to bullshit you about what you can't do. Of course, you're free to pursue your dream, but it might not work.
 
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