Why the Global Shortage in Computer Chips Matters to You -

Un Platano

big blatano xDDDD
True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
I see all kinds of listings for cards at triple the price they're supposed to be, but are people actually buying those? Sellers can list parts at whatever price they want, but that doesn't mean anyone is buying them at that price. I can't fathom why someone would pay $800 for a 3060 because they can't wait, unless they're totally clueless and think that's just how expensive computer parts are supposed to be.
 

Kosher Dill

Potato Chips
True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
I see all kinds of listings for cards at triple the price they're supposed to be, but are people actually buying those?
Just check the "sold listings" on Ebay and you can see that yes, they are. $900 is about the going rate for a 3060 at the moment, it seems.
 

BootlegPopeye

kiwifarms.net
It isn't just the high end cards the market is distorted on - the fucking cryptominers also started to grab up the mid high range cards ($180-240 price range) making it harder to get new in box ones for retail. I only managed to get my current one as a refurb, and even then it was over retail slightly.
 

Smaug's Smokey Hole

Sweeney did nothing wrong.
kiwifarms.net
I see all kinds of listings for cards at triple the price they're supposed to be, but are people actually buying those? Sellers can list parts at whatever price they want, but that doesn't mean anyone is buying them at that price. I can't fathom why someone would pay $800 for a 3060 because they can't wait, unless they're totally clueless and think that's just how expensive computer parts are supposed to be.
The 2060 got relaunched, there's now A LOT of Asus cards available in my country at a retail price of $620. Buying a 3060 for $800 doesn't seem that crazy but buying a 2060 for $600 is actually insane.

What can be bought right now(in my country):

GT 710 - those are generally available.
GT 730 - hit and miss.
GT 1030 - there's actually some around right now at GTX 1050 MSRP prices.
RTX 2060 - tons of them.

That's all there is.
 

HymanHive

kiwifarms.net
How does this chip shortage affect manufacturing facilities? If, for example, the Ford plant took a hacking/lightning strike and frazzled some chips, would production stop?

What about PLC systems that die occasionally? Are those components at risk as well?
 

naaaaiiiiillllll!!!

Null thought I was British, lol
kiwifarms.net
Thinking about it more deeply, considering how much tech is dependent on gpus, doesn't that mean any USA conflict with China will have the USA lose due to the Chinese owning the entire computer chip infrastructure?
It’s tricky to say, but I would agree. TSMC is trying desperately to setup fabs outside Taiwan (and East Asia in general) for this reason (the big Arizona fab for example). If a China war broke out, it would be a nightmare for both manufacturing and logistics. Intel has fabs in the USA, Ireland (outside Dublin) and Israel (Kiryat Gat — the one place not getting targeted by rockets), so they’ll be okay. Samsung has a fab in Austin Texas, so they might be okay, but everyone else? It would be ugly.
 

Smaug's Smokey Hole

Sweeney did nothing wrong.
kiwifarms.net
How does this chip shortage affect manufacturing facilities? If, for example, the Ford plant took a hacking/lightning strike and frazzled some chips, would production stop?

What about PLC systems that die occasionally? Are those components at risk as well?
It's hard to say actually, components for cars probably won't be running on the latest nodes that AMD, Nvidia, Apple and others want to get into for bleeding edge performance. Same with PLC, routers and all kinds of things. TSMC still produces things up to 90nm and above. The 90nm process is what Sony used when combining the Emotion Engine and Graphics Synthesizer into one chip for the PS2 so the node is old enough to do porn.

Here's some interesting excerpts from an article I read yesterday.
While the supply squeeze has been felt across the semiconductor industry, those display-bound integrated circuits pose specific challenges. Since they are not especially advanced, the circuits are typically made at chip factories that are several generations behind the cutting edge. With chipmakers focused on building more advanced fabrication plants that yield more valuable components, there has been little incentive to invest in capacity at older facilities. It’s simply not possible to churn out more of them even when demand spikes.

“Anything that has a screen built into it is going to be affected by these price increases.”
Paul Gagnon, Omdia
...
Companies that act as electronics component brokers say that certain components have seen prices jump orders of magnitude; voltage regulators used in countless products that normally cost 50 cents have been selling for as much as $70. But at the consumer level, products that require display integrated circuits are feeling the impact first, and hardest, because of those factory limitations.
...
The impacts have been felt beyond traditional consumer technology as well. Carmakers, in particular, were left flatfooted after expecting fewer sales. After preemptively canceling orders for semiconductor components, many auto manufacturers have had to stop production while they wait for supply reinforcements to arrive. Broader supply chain disruptions have hurt as well, including a fire in March that shut down a plant in Japan that makes a range of different semiconductor components—including display integrated circuits.

Auto manufacturers cancelling or cutting back their orders, along with other companies, then realizing it was a mistake and trying to buy themselves back in makes sense. A shortage of display circuitry now that there are so many digital displays seems like a reasonable explanation for why things grind to a halt. I think it was in the "New tech things you hate" thread where someone posted that a manufacturer have reverted to analogue gauges as a temporary measure.
 
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