Careercow Wil Wheaton + Felicia Day - The "Man" who soy'd the World and the Fakest of Geek Girls, SJW sexual harassment fence-sitters

Pick a side

  • Wil "Soyboy" Wheaton

  • Felicia "Crybaby" Day

  • That shotgun’s looking pretty good right about now...

  • Just shut the fuck up Wesley

  • Felicia blew me for this vote


Results are only viewable after voting.

Mola Ram

Self Righteous Ego Bastard Asshole
True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
That plot is is incredibly unoriginal and they added a layer of reddit on top of it. Are creepypastas even popular anymore? That last time I remember hearing about them was somewhere around 5 years ago. They should just remake Tales from the Crypt with Day's withered husk of a husband as the Crypt Keeper.

That "pooka" shit is so unoriginal it was the plot of a terrible movie from just a few years ago, The Bye Bye Man. (The short story it's based on, "The Bridge to Body Island," is actually pretty creepy.)

Also, that cast list, oof. Adding that to my "must miss" pile.
 

William Shatner

multi faceted actor
kiwifarms.net
New post on wil's blog where he shares his incompetence in vidya games:


My friend, Will Hindmarch, is a brilliant writer and game designer. He’s one of the smartest people I know, and his weekly newsletter always challenges and inspires me.
In this week’s newsletter, he talks about playing a videogame called CONTROL, which by coincidence, I began playing over the weekend.
I wanted to share some thoughts here that I shared with Will privately, because I’m interested to hear your thoughts on my thoughts.
Will said:
> As of this week, I’m also playing Control again, and glad to be doing so.
Here’s my reply to him:
This game is beguiling me. I have only faced three boss battles, and I’ve nearly quit during each one. I love the story, I love the visual and audio design, and I love the puzzles. But boy do I hate it when it becomes a video game with a boss battle, especially when it takes two dozen or so runs at it to get the shape of the level, and you have to sit through 30 second loading screens every time you die.
It’s like I’m intrigued by the story, but my skills as a FPS gamer just aren’t where they need to be for me to get through those video game bits without ragequitting at least once a day.
I had a thought about Control: I’ve been playing RDR2 since it came out. It’s literally the only game I’ve played, I’ve even replayed it, with a replay of RDR1 in between. I have been able to adjust the difficulty setting so the game really holds my hand and makes the video game portions of the story simple and satisfying to get through. In a way, I’m getting to live inside competence porn, right? And I’m a middle-aged white dude in that game, which is significant when I compare it to Control, which is REALLY FUCKING HARD … and the protagonist is a woman.
So I’m thinking about how REALLY easy life is for middle-aged white dudes, especially when we compare our lives to the lives of young women. My current experience has become a metaphor, which has been intellectually stimulating and challenging (in a really good way).
In RDR2, I have (effectively) unlimited ammo, (effectively) unlimited health items, and because I only cared about the story and exploring the world (sidebar: riding my horse all the way across the map, stopping only to engage photo mode, like I’m a tourist in the old world, is really satisfying and fun), I adjusted the difficulty to reflect my personal difficulty level in the real world, which is to say I put it on the easiest setting.
When I started CONTROL, I immediately noticed that I have to manage my ammo, and health is WAY more vulnerable than it is in RDR2. There’s no computer assist in aiming; I have to do it all myself (and I am NOT good at it). Mechanically, I have to work really hard to kite around the bosses without dying, and the game is just totally unforgiving when I fuck up.
Maybe I’m overthinking it, but I feel like the experience I’ve had with these two games is a really strong metaphor for the different experiences men and women have in the world, online and off.
I don’t know if any of this makes sense outside of my head, but now that I’m thinking about the hours I spent playing Control yesterday, and thinking about how, even though it can be REALLY hard and REALLY frustrating, it’s also compelling. I’m not entirely sure it’s worth the effort, with my limited free time (when I ragequit last night, I said, out loud in an empty room: “This is such a waste of my time. I am not having fun and I don’t know why I’m even giving this goddamn game my time,” and yet here I am, thinking about trying it again today.
This is a new experience for me, to be seriously challenged in a game and not know if I’ll be able to overcome the challenges that exist between me and the resolution of the story. After nearly three years of something that’s less gaming and more competency porn, I’m finding out if I can actually rise up to meet a challenge (and if it’s worth the effort) that I can’t skip or have help overcoming.
I feel like it’s a powerful and meaningful metaphor, and it’s caused me to examine and reflect upon my privilege, and I appreciate that. At the same time, I feel like the point of games is to be fun, and this game isn’t really “fun” the way RDR2 has been “fun” for me.
But I don’t think that’s the game’s fault. My son is 30 and he loves games like this that are REALLY hard (he loves something called Dark Souls that reduced me to tears in about thirty seconds). Most of the games I looked at when I was trying to decide what to play instead of RDR2 seem to fit into this difficulty curve, which I suspect may just be the state of games today, and I’m an old man who is outside the demo.
There’s another metaphor for ya.
 

break these cuffs

An icy fear creeps into your heart
kiwifarms.net
New post on wil's blog where he shares his incompetence in vidya games:


My friend, Will Hindmarch, is a brilliant writer and game designer. He’s one of the smartest people I know, and his weekly newsletter always challenges and inspires me.
In this week’s newsletter, he talks about playing a videogame called CONTROL, which by coincidence, I began playing over the weekend.
I wanted to share some thoughts here that I shared with Will privately, because I’m interested to hear your thoughts on my thoughts.
Will said:

Here’s my reply to him:
This game is beguiling me. I have only faced three boss battles, and I’ve nearly quit during each one. I love the story, I love the visual and audio design, and I love the puzzles. But boy do I hate it when it becomes a video game with a boss battle, especially when it takes two dozen or so runs at it to get the shape of the level, and you have to sit through 30 second loading screens every time you die.
It’s like I’m intrigued by the story, but my skills as a FPS gamer just aren’t where they need to be for me to get through those video game bits without ragequitting at least once a day.
I had a thought about Control: I’ve been playing RDR2 since it came out. It’s literally the only game I’ve played, I’ve even replayed it, with a replay of RDR1 in between. I have been able to adjust the difficulty setting so the game really holds my hand and makes the video game portions of the story simple and satisfying to get through. In a way, I’m getting to live inside competence porn, right? And I’m a middle-aged white dude in that game, which is significant when I compare it to Control, which is REALLY FUCKING HARD … and the protagonist is a woman.
So I’m thinking about how REALLY easy life is for middle-aged white dudes, especially when we compare our lives to the lives of young women. My current experience has become a metaphor, which has been intellectually stimulating and challenging (in a really good way).
In RDR2, I have (effectively) unlimited ammo, (effectively) unlimited health items, and because I only cared about the story and exploring the world (sidebar: riding my horse all the way across the map, stopping only to engage photo mode, like I’m a tourist in the old world, is really satisfying and fun), I adjusted the difficulty to reflect my personal difficulty level in the real world, which is to say I put it on the easiest setting.
When I started CONTROL, I immediately noticed that I have to manage my ammo, and health is WAY more vulnerable than it is in RDR2. There’s no computer assist in aiming; I have to do it all myself (and I am NOT good at it). Mechanically, I have to work really hard to kite around the bosses without dying, and the game is just totally unforgiving when I fuck up.
Maybe I’m overthinking it, but I feel like the experience I’ve had with these two games is a really strong metaphor for the different experiences men and women have in the world, online and off.
I don’t know if any of this makes sense outside of my head, but now that I’m thinking about the hours I spent playing Control yesterday, and thinking about how, even though it can be REALLY hard and REALLY frustrating, it’s also compelling. I’m not entirely sure it’s worth the effort, with my limited free time (when I ragequit last night, I said, out loud in an empty room: “This is such a waste of my time. I am not having fun and I don’t know why I’m even giving this goddamn game my time,” and yet here I am, thinking about trying it again today.
This is a new experience for me, to be seriously challenged in a game and not know if I’ll be able to overcome the challenges that exist between me and the resolution of the story. After nearly three years of something that’s less gaming and more competency porn, I’m finding out if I can actually rise up to meet a challenge (and if it’s worth the effort) that I can’t skip or have help overcoming.
I feel like it’s a powerful and meaningful metaphor, and it’s caused me to examine and reflect upon my privilege, and I appreciate that. At the same time, I feel like the point of games is to be fun, and this game isn’t really “fun” the way RDR2 has been “fun” for me.
But I don’t think that’s the game’s fault. My son is 30 and he loves games like this that are REALLY hard (he loves something called Dark Souls that reduced me to tears in about thirty seconds). Most of the games I looked at when I was trying to decide what to play instead of RDR2 seem to fit into this difficulty curve, which I suspect may just be the state of games today, and I’m an old man who is outside the demo.
There’s another metaphor for ya.
tl;dr Big faggot played a game that didn't hold his hand for the first time and is thrilled by the challenge. Also, Dark Souls made him cry. Don't forget white male privilege.

What a god damn baby. He had a challenging time playing a video game and felt accomplishment after overcoming those challenges!? Stop the fucking presses! What a unique and special experience. Wil sure is a marvelous individual with vast, worldly experiences and a unique outlook on life. How many people could manage to sound this pathetic and this smug at the same time after beating a couple levels in vidya? I could give someone new to video games a pass on thinking this is profound, but this is world renowned geek Wil Wheaton who once bragged about spending his vacation playing a single arcade game in a pizza shop.
 

Twitter Hate Mob

Actual size
kiwifarms.net
New post on wil's blog where he shares his incompetence in vidya games:


My friend, Will Hindmarch, is a brilliant writer and game designer. He’s one of the smartest people I know, and his weekly newsletter always challenges and inspires me.
In this week’s newsletter, he talks about playing a videogame called CONTROL, which by coincidence, I began playing over the weekend.
I wanted to share some thoughts here that I shared with Will privately, because I’m interested to hear your thoughts on my thoughts.
Will said:

Here’s my reply to him:
This game is beguiling me. I have only faced three boss battles, and I’ve nearly quit during each one. I love the story, I love the visual and audio design, and I love the puzzles. But boy do I hate it when it becomes a video game with a boss battle, especially when it takes two dozen or so runs at it to get the shape of the level, and you have to sit through 30 second loading screens every time you die.
It’s like I’m intrigued by the story, but my skills as a FPS gamer just aren’t where they need to be for me to get through those video game bits without ragequitting at least once a day.
I had a thought about Control: I’ve been playing RDR2 since it came out. It’s literally the only game I’ve played, I’ve even replayed it, with a replay of RDR1 in between. I have been able to adjust the difficulty setting so the game really holds my hand and makes the video game portions of the story simple and satisfying to get through. In a way, I’m getting to live inside competence porn, right? And I’m a middle-aged white dude in that game, which is significant when I compare it to Control, which is REALLY FUCKING HARD … and the protagonist is a woman.
So I’m thinking about how REALLY easy life is for middle-aged white dudes, especially when we compare our lives to the lives of young women. My current experience has become a metaphor, which has been intellectually stimulating and challenging (in a really good way).
In RDR2, I have (effectively) unlimited ammo, (effectively) unlimited health items, and because I only cared about the story and exploring the world (sidebar: riding my horse all the way across the map, stopping only to engage photo mode, like I’m a tourist in the old world, is really satisfying and fun), I adjusted the difficulty to reflect my personal difficulty level in the real world, which is to say I put it on the easiest setting.
When I started CONTROL, I immediately noticed that I have to manage my ammo, and health is WAY more vulnerable than it is in RDR2. There’s no computer assist in aiming; I have to do it all myself (and I am NOT good at it). Mechanically, I have to work really hard to kite around the bosses without dying, and the game is just totally unforgiving when I fuck up.
Maybe I’m overthinking it, but I feel like the experience I’ve had with these two games is a really strong metaphor for the different experiences men and women have in the world, online and off.
I don’t know if any of this makes sense outside of my head, but now that I’m thinking about the hours I spent playing Control yesterday, and thinking about how, even though it can be REALLY hard and REALLY frustrating, it’s also compelling. I’m not entirely sure it’s worth the effort, with my limited free time (when I ragequit last night, I said, out loud in an empty room: “This is such a waste of my time. I am not having fun and I don’t know why I’m even giving this goddamn game my time,” and yet here I am, thinking about trying it again today.
This is a new experience for me, to be seriously challenged in a game and not know if I’ll be able to overcome the challenges that exist between me and the resolution of the story. After nearly three years of something that’s less gaming and more competency porn, I’m finding out if I can actually rise up to meet a challenge (and if it’s worth the effort) that I can’t skip or have help overcoming.
I feel like it’s a powerful and meaningful metaphor, and it’s caused me to examine and reflect upon my privilege, and I appreciate that. At the same time, I feel like the point of games is to be fun, and this game isn’t really “fun” the way RDR2 has been “fun” for me.
But I don’t think that’s the game’s fault. My son is 30 and he loves games like this that are REALLY hard (he loves something called Dark Souls that reduced me to tears in about thirty seconds). Most of the games I looked at when I was trying to decide what to play instead of RDR2 seem to fit into this difficulty curve, which I suspect may just be the state of games today, and I’m an old man who is outside the demo.
There’s another metaphor for ya.

This is a "man" in his late 40's :stress:
 

William Shatner

multi faceted actor
kiwifarms.net
So I’m thinking about how REALLY easy life is for middle-aged white dudes, especially when we compare our lives to the lives of young women. My current experience has become a metaphor, which has been intellectually stimulating and challenging (in a really good way).
In RDR2, I have (effectively) unlimited ammo, (effectively) unlimited health items, and because I only cared about the story and exploring the world (sidebar: riding my horse all the way across the map, stopping only to engage photo mode, like I’m a tourist in the old world, is really satisfying and fun), I adjusted the difficulty to reflect my personal difficulty level in the real world, which is to say I put it on the easiest setting.

I hate this fucking braindead logic that generalizes everyone life experience based on their race and gender, just because you live in the easiest difficulty doens't mean that everyone also does. Individuality doens't matter for white liberals who boast about having a hard time on videogames whilte sitting his 40year old ass on the couch
 

tantric_depressive

Be kind, REEEEEE
kiwifarms.net
So what youre saying is he did nothing wrong, he did everything correct. Got it.

Also I used to think this was the director guy but that is JJ Abrams. The more you know I guess.
New post on wil's blog where he shares his incompetence in vidya games:


My friend, Will Hindmarch, is a brilliant writer and game designer. He’s one of the smartest people I know, and his weekly newsletter always challenges and inspires me.
In this week’s newsletter, he talks about playing a videogame called CONTROL, which by coincidence, I began playing over the weekend.
I wanted to share some thoughts here that I shared with Will privately, because I’m interested to hear your thoughts on my thoughts.
Will said:

Here’s my reply to him:
This game is beguiling me. I have only faced three boss battles, and I’ve nearly quit during each one. I love the story, I love the visual and audio design, and I love the puzzles. But boy do I hate it when it becomes a video game with a boss battle, especially when it takes two dozen or so runs at it to get the shape of the level, and you have to sit through 30 second loading screens every time you die.
It’s like I’m intrigued by the story, but my skills as a FPS gamer just aren’t where they need to be for me to get through those video game bits without ragequitting at least once a day.
I had a thought about Control: I’ve been playing RDR2 since it came out. It’s literally the only game I’ve played, I’ve even replayed it, with a replay of RDR1 in between. I have been able to adjust the difficulty setting so the game really holds my hand and makes the video game portions of the story simple and satisfying to get through. In a way, I’m getting to live inside competence porn, right? And I’m a middle-aged white dude in that game, which is significant when I compare it to Control, which is REALLY FUCKING HARD … and the protagonist is a woman.
So I’m thinking about how REALLY easy life is for middle-aged white dudes, especially when we compare our lives to the lives of young women. My current experience has become a metaphor, which has been intellectually stimulating and challenging (in a really good way).
In RDR2, I have (effectively) unlimited ammo, (effectively) unlimited health items, and because I only cared about the story and exploring the world (sidebar: riding my horse all the way across the map, stopping only to engage photo mode, like I’m a tourist in the old world, is really satisfying and fun), I adjusted the difficulty to reflect my personal difficulty level in the real world, which is to say I put it on the easiest setting.
When I started CONTROL, I immediately noticed that I have to manage my ammo, and health is WAY more vulnerable than it is in RDR2. There’s no computer assist in aiming; I have to do it all myself (and I am NOT good at it). Mechanically, I have to work really hard to kite around the bosses without dying, and the game is just totally unforgiving when I fuck up.
Maybe I’m overthinking it, but I feel like the experience I’ve had with these two games is a really strong metaphor for the different experiences men and women have in the world, online and off.
I don’t know if any of this makes sense outside of my head, but now that I’m thinking about the hours I spent playing Control yesterday, and thinking about how, even though it can be REALLY hard and REALLY frustrating, it’s also compelling. I’m not entirely sure it’s worth the effort, with my limited free time (when I ragequit last night, I said, out loud in an empty room: “This is such a waste of my time. I am not having fun and I don’t know why I’m even giving this goddamn game my time,” and yet here I am, thinking about trying it again today.
This is a new experience for me, to be seriously challenged in a game and not know if I’ll be able to overcome the challenges that exist between me and the resolution of the story. After nearly three years of something that’s less gaming and more competency porn, I’m finding out if I can actually rise up to meet a challenge (and if it’s worth the effort) that I can’t skip or have help overcoming.
I feel like it’s a powerful and meaningful metaphor, and it’s caused me to examine and reflect upon my privilege, and I appreciate that. At the same time, I feel like the point of games is to be fun, and this game isn’t really “fun” the way RDR2 has been “fun” for me.
But I don’t think that’s the game’s fault. My son is 30 and he loves games like this that are REALLY hard (he loves something called Dark Souls that reduced me to tears in about thirty seconds). Most of the games I looked at when I was trying to decide what to play instead of RDR2 seem to fit into this difficulty curve, which I suspect may just be the state of games today, and I’m an old man who is outside the demo.
There’s another metaphor for ya.
He's basically stealing this whole flawed concept of 'identity as difficulty setting ' blog post idea from fellow faggot of the celebrity nerdsphere, John Scalzi.
And, yeah, those poor young women, lol. How come it's not ever some literally poor, elderly women they focus on when these soyboys wanna self-flagellate in the public square?
 

Wallace

Cram it in me, baby!
kiwifarms.net
I hate this fucking braindead logic that generalizes everyone life experience based on their race and gender, just because you live in the easiest difficulty doens't mean that everyone also does. Individuality doens't matter for white liberals who boast about having a hard time on videogames whilte sitting his 40year old ass on the couch

Privilege is a one-dimensional universal constant. A straight white male who is homeless and dying of starvation on the streets has more privilege than Michelle Obama. Privilege makes the white man's successes unearned and his failures his own fault, and vice versa for the non-privileged.

He's basically stealing this whole flawed concept of 'identity as difficulty setting ' blog post idea from fellow faggot of the celebrity nerdsphere, John Scalzi.
And, yeah, those poor young women, lol. How come it's not ever some literally poor, elderly women they focus on when these soyboys wanna self-flagellate in the public square?

Because young, middle-class white women are the market who their advertisers are paying for.
 

Parthenos

Why hast thou let me see this, Lucifer?
kiwifarms.net
Wil Wheaton said:
"I had a thought about Control: I’ve been playing RDR2 since it came out. It’s literally the only game I’ve played, I’ve even replayed it, with a replay of RDR1 in between. I have been able to adjust the difficulty setting so the game really holds my hand and makes the video game portions of the story simple and satisfying to get through. In a way, I’m getting to live inside competence porn, right? And I’m a middle-aged white dude in that game, which is significant when I compare it to Control, which is REALLY FUCKING HARD … and the protagonist is a woman.
So I’m thinking about how REALLY easy life is for middle-aged white dudes, especially when we compare our lives to the lives of young women. My current experience has become a metaphor, which has been intellectually stimulating and challenging (in a really good way)."

Red Dead 2? So how many suffragettes did you kill, Wil?

Also, he undermines himself by mentioning Dark Souls, which has a protagonist that can be customized towards being a white man or black woman or whatever. But that doesn't really matter, though, since no matter who you are you have to git gud to survive and stand on your own two feet. Which, frankly, rings more true to reality than Wil "I say I live on easy mode because I'm a white male when actually it's because I have fame and money" Wheaton.
 

William Shatner

multi faceted actor
kiwifarms.net
Ultimately, class divides us more than race or gender. All of Wil's problems are petty and generated by his own privilege like having a hard time with a game, not getting acting jobs he deems worthy enough of his star and being harassed on twitter by alt rights and trans people alike.

In the perfect world Wil and his fellow liberal friends dream of, capitalist parasites like him would get their heads on stakes.
 

Judge Holden

Explorer in the further regions of autism
True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
In the perfect world Wil and his fellow liberal friends dream of, capitalist parasites like him would get their heads on stakes.
You are under the impression Wil and his clique friends actually believe in the shit they spew and are not just performatively spewing hyperbolic edgewoke shit for asspats and kudos while living and acting in utter contradiction to everything they preach.

Think of them like you would the born again christian speds of old who would loudly proclaim judgement and damnation on their neighbours for not going to church, demand all "indecent" literature and texts be banned from local schools and libraries, and would aggressively protest against any suspected atheist or homosexual from holding any kind of job in their town....and then when they thought nobody was watching, they would steal from the church collection plate, kick a homeless guy in the face on their way home, then when their wives were asleep go to a seedy motel and fuck underaged boywhores while snorting meth.

Its all just shitty excuses for people using ideological causes as cynical props for them to get status, money, or power, not to mention immunity from being exposed and shamed for their own shady behavior
 

Crescent Fresh

kiwifarms.net
That "pooka" shit is so unoriginal it was the plot of a terrible movie from just a few years ago, The Bye Bye Man. (The short story it's based on, "The Bridge to Body Island," is actually pretty creepy.)

Also, that cast list, oof. Adding that to my "must miss" pile.

Nah, that’s the thing. “Pooka” in this case is an already-existing Christmas-themed horror movie that has an entirely different premise, being the descent into madness of a mascot suit wearer. It wasn’t that great, but being easily the most watchable out of the “Into the Dark” series of vaguely holiday-themed horror, it became what can sort of be called a “fan favorite”.

What makes it significantly weirder is that the original movie itself is incredibly far from “good” Creepypasta material. Sure, it has a creepy mascot suit, but the movie ends on a sad, regretful note that doesn’t lend itself to creepy stories... except to Wil Wheaton, apparently.
 
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tantric_depressive

Be kind, REEEEEE
kiwifarms.net
Ultimately, class divides us more than race or gender. All of Wil's problems are petty and generated by his own privilege like having a hard time with a game, not getting acting jobs he deems worthy enough of his star and being harassed on twitter by alt rights and trans people alike.
Oh, most definitely, that's why Wil ignores class as a social issue, cuz then he wouldn't be able to act like the most important nerd in the world, lording it over all the problematic pleb incels and gamers

Part of me really wants to believe these posts are being made by the real Bill Shatner.
Real Shatner did cop to being a 4chan shitposter, so you never know
 

Crescent Fresh

kiwifarms.net
A bit more clarification on Pooka Lives: The original director from the first film is nowhere near this one. That’s somewhat notable in this case as said first installment was directed by Nacho Vigondo, an “indie darling” director known for that one romantic drama where the woman’s actions are mirrored by a giant monster terrorizing Korea.

The director for Pooka Lives? A guy whose main credit outside of a few anthology series is... a Spanish rip-off of Shaun of the Dead.

Also, the film’s official Twitter is just an absolute trainwreck that is so far removed from the tone of the original that it retroactively makes perfect sense why Day and Wil are involved.

Edit: Speak of the devil, here’s Red Letter Media reviewing the original, at about 23 minutes in.
 
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break these cuffs

An icy fear creeps into your heart
kiwifarms.net
Cross-posting from Chelsea's thread. Day is voicing Mary Jane in the new season of Spider-Man on Disney's streaming service.

 

The Gagh Whisperer

kiwifarms.net
Wil's life is defined by a moment of "sheer fucking hubris" when he decided he was better than his TNG co-stars and believed he could leave his cushy well-paying TNG gig to become a movie star, right when he was entering an extremely awkward stage of puberty. That's the one moment that will haunt his entire life, and he knows it.

He had a job on TNG at its peak, something most actors would have killed for, but he wanted MORE.

He then moved to working at Video Toaster. Something most tech workers would have killed for. But he wanted MORE.

Over the past two decades he's leveraged his TNG role into every aspect of "geek culture" that would put him on camera and cut him a cheque, whinging constantly along the way about everything that didn't go exactly as he wanted.

But in the end, he's still Wil Wheaton, and that's just not something that appeals to people.
 

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