World War 1 and 2 History and Discussion Thread -

TaimuRadiu

Kaiserin
kiwifarms.net
There's some weird shit that happened in WW2 that nobody really thinks about. For example, did you know that at one time the US Army and the Wehrmact fought a battle against the SS? https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_for_Castle_Itter

Or that the Confederate flag was flown over at least one Japanese castle? http://www.confederatedigest.com/2012/01/planting-confederate-flag-at-snui.html

That the woman we know today as Tokyo Rose wasn't the only one (she went by Orphan Ann on air) and that she pretty much only took the job because she didn't want to be interned in the USA, and that she was using her food rations to feed Allied POWs? (In an Orphan Ann broadcast after the Hiroshima bomb but before the Nagasaki bomb, a GI who was "comic relief" on The Zero Hour snarked that he was pretty sure he and his friends would be next.)

I'll end this with a quote from Hermann Goering: "“If one enemy bomb falls on Berlin, you can call me Meyer."
 

LateNightMuffin

kiwifarms.net
Hans Rudel was a Stuka pilot responsible for 51 aerial victories and the destruction of 519 tanks, 150 artillery emplacements, 4 armored trains, 70 landing craft, 1 cruiser, and 1 battleship. He was shot down or forced to land 30 times by AA fire, including having to make a forced landing behind Soviet lines, after which he swam a river and made his way back to the German line.

He was wounded five times. On Feb 8 1945 he was wounded in the foot bad enough that they amputated his leg below the knee. He returned to flying combat missions 5 weeks later and destroyed 26 more tanks.

He was an unrepentant Nazi to the end of his life.

He was married three times. It seems his wives all had the same first name: Ursula.
 

Imperialist #348

Injured in a accident that wasn't your fault?
kiwifarms.net
There's some weird shit that happened in WW2 that nobody really thinks about. For example, did you know that at one time the US Army and the Wehrmact fought a battle against the SS? https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_for_Castle_Itter

Or that the Confederate flag was flown over at least one Japanese castle? http://www.confederatedigest.com/2012/01/planting-confederate-flag-at-snui.html

That the woman we know today as Tokyo Rose wasn't the only one (she went by Orphan Ann on air) and that she pretty much only took the job because she didn't want to be interned in the USA, and that she was using her food rations to feed Allied POWs? (In an Orphan Ann broadcast after the Hiroshima bomb but before the Nagasaki bomb, a GI who was "comic relief" on The Zero Hour snarked that he was pretty sure he and his friends would be next.)

I'll end this with a quote from Hermann Goering: "“If one enemy bomb falls on Berlin, you can call me Meyer."
i believe this is the event that sabatons 'Last Battle'is based on.
 
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MrJokerRager

I like me some nice big boobs
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This looks like something out of the 1950, so well done.


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The markings on the dolls.

 

Starscreams Cape

Read my posts in his voice
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I highly encourage anyone who hasn't seen it to check out "The World At War" documentary series from the 70's. It is THE definitive overview of the war from its roots to the end. Narrated by Laurence Olivier it features something you will not find anywhere else - interviews with the folks still alive at that point. Hitler's secretary, Karl Doenitz (the only other fuhrer of Germany), many German, American & British generals, other folks like Kay Summersby (Ike's secretary, chauffer and possible lover)... Many others.

It is simply the best done documentary series of WWII ever made.
 

Doctor Placebo

Soleimani's back. Tell a friend.
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I highly encourage anyone who hasn't seen it to check out "The World At War" documentary series from the 70's. It is THE definitive overview of the war from its roots to the end. Narrated by Laurence Olivier it features something you will not find anywhere else - interviews with the folks still alive at that point. Hitler's secretary, Karl Doenitz (the only other fuhrer of Germany), many German, American & British generals, other folks like Kay Summersby (Ike's secretary, chauffer and possible lover)... Many others.

It is simply the best done documentary series of WWII ever made.
Every time Doenitz comes into a conversation, all I can think of is:

 

Starscreams Cape

Read my posts in his voice
kiwifarms.net
I already made a pitch for the best WWII documentary above. I'll make another - Dan Carlin's magnificent Hardcore History podcast made an epic, multi part series on WWI called "Blueprint for Armageddon.

One thing he explains so well is one of the main reasons for the trench warfare stalemate. It had to do with a peculiar point in history they were at. The only way to pursue a retreating or routed army with the speed to cut them off was with horses, just like napoleonic times. In the past this was no problem because the routed army had slow firing muskets. Here, however, you had the advent of the machine gun, which made such pursuit with horses out of the question. Those that tried early in the war were massacred.

Of course the tank came along late in the war and showed it's value in doing what horses did of old.

Anyway, HIGHLY recommend this if you are into podcasts.

 
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millais

The Yellow Rose of Victoria, Texas
True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
I already made a pitch for the best WWII documentary above. I'll make another - Dan Carlin's magnificent Hardcore History podcast made an epic, multi part series on WWI called "Blueprint for Armageddon.

One thing he explains so well is one of the main reasons for the trench warfare stalemate. It had to do with a peculiar point in history they were at. The only way to pursue a retreating or routed army with the speed to cut them off was with horses, just like napoleonic times. In the past this was no problem because the routed army had slow firing muskets. Here, however, you had the advent of the machine gun, which made such pursuit with horses out of the question. Those that tried early in the war were massacred.

Of course the tank came along late in the war and showed it's value in doing what horses did of old.

Anyway, HIGHLY recommend this if you are into podcasts.

iirc, the main bottleneck to making breakthroughs in the face of an entrenched front bristling with modern firepower (which disproportionately favored the defender) was not so much mobility as it was communications. With spotty field telephone connections and runners struggling to carry updates from the advance units back to the reserve and the supporting artillery, they could never fully exploit successful localized breakthroughs and transform them into strategic breakthroughs. The counterattack would always contain breakthroughs before the reserve was able to be brought up and fully committed, and the artillery would struggle to switch to new and updated targets to support the breakthrough after the opening barrage hit everything in the first layer of the defense. Precisely coordinated feats of fire support like the modern time-on-target barrage were simply impossible due to the lack of field radios at the time.

On the tactical level, mobility of the fire support element was definitely part of the equation, as the sturmtruppen/assault infantry would frequently outpace the direct fire artillery in back of them and thus struggle to deal with the rearward strongpoints in any defence in depth, but it wasn't a devastating limitation. The German infantry got very far during the Kaiserschlacht even without tanks or mobile direct fire support. And after the initial psychology shock of the tank wore off, the Germans became quite adept at blunting armored offensives with their artillery and close infantry action so armor was not a war-winning solution on its own.

And strategic mobility was definitely a factor as well, since they often struggled to hide big breakthrough attempts because they had to start concentrating the forces involved well in advance, and that could be quickly ascertained by aerial reconnaissance, trench raids to capture prisoners, espionage, etc

In the early part of the war, the mounted infantry fulfilled the role of providing strategic mobility in the breakthrough, but again, without the communications to coordinate and exploit localized breakthroughs, it didn't amount to much.
 

Doctor Placebo

Soleimani's back. Tell a friend.
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Rasputin did nothing wrong and he was killed because da jooz were jealous of his long dick
Rasputin was a grifter and snake oil salesman. I wouldn't say he did nothing wrong, but placing the blame for Russia's problems on him is a bit absurd. It's like if Melania Trump went to a new age doctor and everyone started blaming him for the Corona Virus and economic crash.
 
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Doctor Placebo

Soleimani's back. Tell a friend.
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Aufseherin was the title of female Nazi concentration camp overseers. Of the 55,000 guards who served in the camps during the war, about 3,700 were women.
A few of the more (in)famous ones:
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Ilse Koch, wife of SS Commandant Karl-Otto Koch. One of the first Nazis tried by the US Military. Known as the "Witch of Buchenwald," she was accused of ordering prisoners with tattoos skinned to make lampshades and sexually assaulting prisoners, although neither of these were ever definitively proven. She was given a life sentence for aiding and abetting in murders at the camp and died in prison in 1967 at the age of 60. Koch was the inspiration for exploitation movies like "Ilsa, She Wolf of the SS," although she was clearly more of a porker than the sexy female stars.

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Dorothea Binz, was a deputy guard at the all women's camp of Ravensbruck. Although she was lower ranked, she was the guard that camp prisoners feared. She would patrol with a whip and a German Shepherd, and was known to frequently beat and stomp on weaker prisoners, some of whom died. She trained several other infamous Aufseherin women, including ones who were significantly older than her. She had an SS officer boyfriend she lived with outside the camp, and the two would go on dates where they would watch women in the camp be flogged and laugh at them until he was transferred to Buchenwald. Binz was tried and executed by the British for war crimes in 1947. She was 27.

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Ruth Neudeck, another Ravensbruck guard who was one of the ones trained by Binz. Neudeck became Barracks Overseer and later was placed in charge of the Uckermark extermination complex down the road from Ravensbruck. There she oversaw the execution of roughly 5,000 women and children. A French prisoner at Ravensbruck testified that she once cut an inmate's throat with a sharp edged shovel. She was tried and executed in the same trial as Binz. She was 28.

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Johanna Langefeld was the head of several women's concentration camps, primarily Ravensbruck but also women's portions of Lichtenburg and Auschwitz for a time. She was relieved of her duties at Auschwitz and the male officer was placed in charge because she was "in no way capable of coping with the situation" according to a report by Rudolf Hoss. Hoss's order was countermanded by Himmler however, and Langefeld was eventually reassigned back to Ravensbruck where she was eventually dismissed for showing excessive sympathy to Polish prisoners. After the war Langefeld was scheduled to be tried in Krakow by the Soviets, but was broken out of prison by Polish prison staffers who were sympathetic to her due to the sympathy she had shown Polish prisoners in Ravensbruck. She lived under a false identity, first at a convent in Poland before escaping to live illegally with her sister in Munich, and died of old age at 73.

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Irma Grese, nicknamed the "Hyena of Auschwitz" by prisoners and "The Beautiful Beast" by the press during her trial, was a guard at Ravensbruck and Auschwitz. She was tried and sentenced to death during the Belsen trials for cruelty and murder of inmates. Grese appealed her case but was rejected, and according to one witness, sang Nazi marching songs with her cellmate the night before her execution. At age 22, she's the youngest woman who was executed under British law in the 20th century.

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Jenny-Wanda Barkmann was a guard in the Stutthoff SK-III women's camp where she was accused of brutalizing prisoners, some to death, and selecting women and children for the gas chambers. She was tried in post war Poland. She allegedly giggled through her trial and said "Life is indeed a pleasure, and pleasures are usually short" when she was found guilty. She was executed by hanging in 1946. She was 24.

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Herta Bothe trained at Ravensbruck before transferring to Stutthoff women's prison as an overseer. At 6'3" she was the tallest Aufseherin arrested and was known for wearing civilian shoes instead of the jackboots that most SS women wore. At the Belsen Trials Bothe was accused of brutally beating prisoners, including one woman to death and shooting two prisoners, and of being known by prisoners as the "Sadist of Stutthoff." Bothe denied the charges, admitting to hitting prisoners with her hands for camp violations but said she never used a weapon and denied killing anyone. Bothe was sentenced to ten years in prison but was released early by the British in 1951. She was one of the only Aufseherin to agree to an interview later in life. In her 1999 interview, Bothe recalled that the guards weren't allowed to wear gloves while moving dead bodies, some of which were so rotten limbs would tear off while carrying them, and she was terrified of catching typhus from them. She defended her actions as a guard, saying she had no choice and to refuse to serve at the camp would have meant becoming a prisoner herself. Bothe died in 2000 at age 79.
 

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MrJokerRager

I like me some nice big boobs
kiwifarms.net
The Imperial Japanese Army takes the cake for most loyalty that even puts today's jihadis to shame.


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Hirō "Hiroo" Onoda (小野田 寛郎, Onoda Hirō, 19 March 1922 – 16 January 2014) was an Imperial Japanese Army intelligence officer who fought in World War II and was a Japanese holdout who did not surrender at the war's end in August 1945. After the war ended Onoda spent 29 years hiding out in the Philippines until his former commander traveled from Japan to formally relieve him from duty by order of Emperor Shōwa in 1974.[1][2] He held the rank of second lieutenant in the Imperial Japanese Army. He was the penultimate Japanese soldier to surrender, with Teruo Nakamura surrendering later in 1974.
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Austrian Conscript 1915

133 days in Przemysl
kiwifarms.net
The reason Germany lost WW1 was almost completely because they didn't have enough troops to defeat the French on Mars. The Bavarians had a great idea not to send their troops and left a good plan to fall apart. And although the general criticism "it was developed in a kind of pre-industrial era so that they did not take into account what will happen", it is true to some extent, but it is also false. Schlieffen's plan was to explain that the Germans had enough troops to defeat the French, even if something went wrong, and that Germany mobilized enough troops for the case, but as I said, they were to some extent betrayed by the Bavarians. The Germans who moved through Brussels were called "grey men". The problem with the Germans is that they moved too quickly and did not find enough rest before the Battle of the Marne. Until then, they had been extremely disorganized and actually stopped accepting Paris.
 
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