Wuhan Coronavirus: Megathread -

Which country(ies) will fare the worst due to the WuFlu?


  • Total voters
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XYZpdq

fbi most wanted sskealeaton
True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
Should I call up my doc and ask for early refills?
If you don't usually hit them up like a weirdo junkie give it a shot, the worst they will do is say no. As that other guy mentioned some of them are legally not able to written beyond suchandsuch days depending on the script, your local laws, all that good crap.
There may be ways to get some extra mileage out of your stuff too, like that one person with the gabapentin or lyrica or whatever it was. Maybe your doc can point you in a direction like that.
 

Clones of Alex Jones

Deus Ex Wasn't a Game it Was a Prophecy
kiwifarms.net
I see plenty of talk about purchasing water. Can kiwis please elaborate? Is tap water unsafe to drink where you live or do you expect there to be no water on tap? Things have to break down severely for the latter in developed countries, so, maybe it's folly, but I'm not preparing for that eventuality.


It's quite nice if you deep fry it or really flatten it out and dry-fry it on a pan
No bottled water is for when pipes burst, and water treatment facilities shut down.

You can boil water. Also unscented bleach too if you know how to use it correctly. If something happens to the water supply.
 

XYZpdq

fbi most wanted sskealeaton
True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
Are people freaking worse than the standard cat 5 hurricane prep? (I lived there many years)
Central Florida hurricane prep is pretty half-assed from what I've seen so I'm not sure if it would work as a barometer lol. Other aisles seemed to have stuff, dry food, so forth. Didn't check hand sanitizers. I don't really know where they stock them. I've been a rubbing alcohol fan for ages, sanitizers have that yucky gel stuff.
 

Agent Abe Caprine

Defends the dignity of the retarded
kiwifarms.net
Mom also probably wants to be able to lurk and make sure I don't say bad words like nigger. Don't worry, I'm a good kid, mom.
Botchy Galoop's mom, your kid said a bad word!

Trying to look into where various common psych medications come from. Squinting at these photos of labels is making me feel like I'm watching Japanese porn. Maybe, just maybe the blurs will leave and I'll get an eyeful of glorious information!

There's no law that says you have to list where the ingredients in medication come from. Finding out which drug could get hit will be tricky. Probably safe to assume the common stuff has ingredients from China and India.
 

simulated goat

pleasant goat beauty
kiwifarms.net
The future is that we're 3 months away from the Hadj to Mecca and 7 months until the Iranian pilgrimage at Karbala - the second largest human gathering.
I think SA shut down their pilgrimages. However, Iran's cleric are replaying the medieval script by insisting that the faithful should seek healing at the site in Qom. This will end well.
 

Heinous Fuckery

I call shenanigans
True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
I take it gabatin is gabapentin? I've got a cat on it (it's the miracle drug that keeps her from ripping all her hair out). Costco's pharmacy was out of it on Friday, but the pharmacist said to keep trying this week, because it's on order and they will get it back in stock. Just because your pharmacy doesn't have it on hand right now doesn't mean there is none to be had at all; they just weren't prepared for the sudden mad rush, and didn't have lots of extra on hand.
I've actually heard some gabapentin chatter recently. Seems that the vet industry (in my area anyway) has been experiencing some delays in restocking gab for the past 3-4 weeks. Annoyingly delayed, but not yet serious.
 

Glad I couldn't help

Oh hai
kiwifarms.net
Article on the absolute state of Iran wrt the virus.

How Iran Became a New Epicenter of the Coronavirus Outbreak
wright-robin.png

By Robin Wright
February 28, 2020
A man disinfects the shrine of Fatima Masumeh in Qom Iran against coronavirus on Monday.

A man disinfects the shrine of Fatima Masumeh, in Qom, Iran, against coronavirus.Photograph by Ahmad Zohrabi / ISNA / AP

https://www.facebook.com/dialog/fee...m_brand=the-new-yorker&utm_social-type=earned

Iran’s deputy health minister, Iraj Harirchi, was pale and drenched in sweat during a press conference on Monday as he told reporters that the Islamic Republic had “almost stabilized” the country’s outbreak of coronavirus. He mopped his brow so often that an aide scurried to the lectern with a box of tissues. Harirchi dismissed as hype an Iranian lawmaker’s claim that fifty people had already died from COVID-19. “I will resign if the numbers are even half or a quarter of this,” he said, adding that Iran had only sixty-one confirmed cases, with twelve deaths. Iran opposed quarantines, he said, because they belonged to an era before the First World War—“to the plague, cholera, stuff like that.” The next day, Harirchi confirmed in a video—from quarantine—that he had contracted coronavirus.

Iran, a country of eighty-three million people, has now become one of the global epicenters of the coronavirus—with the highest mortality rate in the world. Based on official numbers, the mortality rate in Iran has fluctuated daily, between eight and eighteen per cent, compared to three per cent in China and less everywhere else. Iran is also unique, because a disproportionate number of confirmed cases are senior government officials. On Thursday, the Vice-President, Masoumeh Ebtekar—who gained fame in 1979 as Sister Mary, the spokeswoman for the students who seized the U.S. Embassy and took fifty-two Americans hostage—announced that she, too, had contracted the coronavirus. The day before, she had attended a meeting with President Hassan Rouhani and his cabinet. Two members of parliament, including the chairman of the Committee on National Security and Foreign Policy, have also been infected, as has the mayor of a district in Tehran and a senior cleric who had served as Iran’s Ambassador to the Vatican. One of the lawmakers, Mahmoud Sadeghi, tweeted on Tuesday, “I send this message in a situation where I have little hope of surviving in this world.” The former Vatican Ambassador, who was eighty-one, died on Thursday. So did Elham Sheikhi, a member of the women’s national soccer team, who was twenty-two.
Iranian Deputy Health Minister Iraj Harirchi wipes the sweat off his face.

Iran’s deputy health minister, Iraj Harirchi, wipes sweat from his brow during a press conference, on Monday. He later confirmed that he has contracted coronavirus.Photograph by Mehdi Bolourian / Fars News / AFP / Getty

Iran’s official counts—three hundred and eighty-eight confirmed cases and thirty-four deaths, as of Friday—may be grossly underreported. In an early analysis published on Monday, six Canadian epidemiologists calculated that Iran probably had more than eighteen thousand cases of coronavirus. Their mathematical model was based on Iran’s official death toll, the disease’s infection and mortality rates worldwide, inflections in other countries traced to Iran, flight data, and travel patterns. “Given the low volumes of air travel to countries with identified cases of COVID-19 with origin in Iran (such as Canada), it is likely that Iran is currently experiencing a COVID-19 epidemic of significant size,” they concluded. Because of the wide margin of error, the number of cases could range from as low as thirty-seven hundred to as high as fifty-three thousand. In the end, the Canadian epidemiologists settled on eighteen thousand three hundred, with a ninety-five-per-cent confidence rate. All of their estimates are many, many times higher than the figures that Iran has reported. Their model was published on medRxiv, which posts preliminary research that has not yet been peer-reviewed.
Kamiar Alaei, a widely recognized Iranian global health-policy expert who co-founded an innovative H.I.V. clinic in Tehran, also emphasized the tricky and still evolving mathematics of coronavirus contagion. “The mortality rate elsewhere is around one to two per cent, and three per cent in China,” Alaei, who is now a co-president of the Institute for International Health and Education, in Albany, told me. “Iran has announced thirty-four deaths, although some unofficial reports claim it is at least a hundred and thirty-four and even two hundred. So if the death rate is only one per cent, then the total number of cases would be between thirty-four hundred and ten thousand or even twenty thousand.”
The outbreak appears to have started in Qom, the conservative city of Shiite seminaries run by leading ayatollahs, about two hours from Tehran. It is also home to the Fatima Masumeh shrine—famed for its giant gold dome and intricate blue tilework—which draws pilgrims from all over the world. (For its historic beauty, I visit the shrine complex whenever I go to Qom.) The first mention of the disease by the government was a report of two deaths in the city on February 19th. Initial reports indicate that the carrier of the virus may have been a merchant who travelled between Qom and Wuhan, in China, where COVID-19 is believed to have originated. The outbreak is estimated to have begun between three and six weeks ago, which would mean that the two Iranians who died could have been sick and infecting others for weeks.

Within eight days of the first reported death in Iran, COVID-19 had spread to twenty-four of the country’s thirty-one provinces. The number of cases has roughly doubled daily since Tuesday. Instead of closing down public sites, a measure that public-health experts have taken in other countries, the head of the shrine in Qom called on pilgrims to keep coming. “We consider this holy shrine to be a place of healing. That means people should come here to heal from spiritual and physical diseases,” Mohammad Saeedi, who is also the representative of Iran’s Supreme Leader in Qom, said in a video. Cases traced back to Iran have been reported in Azerbaijan, Afghanistan, Bahrain, Canada, Georgia, Iraq, Kuwait, Lebanon, Oman, Pakistan, and the United Arab Emirates. Many of these cases have been linked specifically to visits to Qom.

Politics may have played a role in the government’s handling of the health crisis, Alaei, the health-policy expert, told me. The outbreak coincided with two major milestones—the anniversary of Iran’s revolution, on February 11th, and the parliamentary election, on February 21st. “The government didn’t want to acknowledge that they had a coronavirus outbreak because they feared it would impact participation in these two events,” he said. “So for weeks there was a huge silence.” Less than forty-three per cent of Iranian voters turned out for the election, the lowest rate of participation since the 1979 revolution. Both voters and poll workers were photographed wearing masks.
“It was the political decision that led to this outbreak in Iran,” Alaei said. “It’s very unfortunate, as Iran has a very well-established infrastructure for the health system and well-educated doctors.” Alaei was imprisoned in 2008 for “communicating with the enemy,” running espionage rings, and trying to “launch a velvet revolution” against the government in Tehran. He spent thirty months in the notorious Evin Prison. He moved to the United States after his release.
The coronavirus is also becoming a new flashpoint between Iran and the United States. After the election, the Supreme Leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, accused Iran’s enemies of exaggerating the threat of coronavirus to scare voters away from the polls. “This negative propaganda about the virus began a couple of months ago and grew larger ahead of the election,” he said. “Their media did not miss the tiniest opportunity for dissuading Iranian voters and resorting to the excuse of disease and the virus.” On Wednesday, the U.S. Secretary of State, Mike Pompeo, countered that Iran was lying about “vital details” of the spread of the virus.


The timing of the epidemic is particularly dire for Iran’s economy. As part of President Trump’s “maximum-pressure campaign,” the U.S. reimposed economic sanctions on Iran—and any foreign company or country that does business with it—in November, 2018. Iran’s economy contracted more than nine per cent last year. Since the coronavirus outbreak began, ten days ago, eleven countries, including major trading partners such as Afghanistan, Iraq, and Turkey, have closed their borders to the Islamic Republic, according to Adnan Mazarei, an economist at the Peterson Institute for International Economics, in Washington. “The entire Middle East region could soon be affected by Iran’s role as an epicenter of this contagion,” he wrote on Thursday. “The Middle East region will certainly be hit by a new round of downward pressure on oil prices on account of a decline in demand for oil by China and elsewhere,” he added. And China has accounted for a quarter of all Iranian trade.
Internal commerce is also likely to take a hit on the eve of Nowruz, the Persian New Year, in three weeks. Nowruz is the country’s biggest holiday, and the ritual is to buy new clothes and toys—and to travel to the Caspian coast or other vacation spots to take a break from Iran’s mounting crises. The more that Nowruz celebrations are curtailed, the greater the danger for protests about the epidemic, global isolation, and unanticipated economic setbacks. Two waves of protests have challenged the regime since November.
Iran took steps this week to check the contagion’s spread. In Tehran’s subways, cars were disinfected and snack shops were shut. In more than a dozen provinces, public venues—college campuses, schools, and cultural centers—were closed. Events drawing large audiences, including soccer games and movie screenings, were postponed. Friday prayers were cancelled in the twenty-four provinces where the virus has appeared. Schools across Iran will be closed for three days, as of Saturday. The Health Ministry has urged people not to shake hands and to avoid crowded places. Social media was filled with parodies—a video of young men on the street shaking their shoes with one another, to avoid shaking hands, and a barber cutting the hair of a customer, who was wearing a mask, with a razor attached to an extender pole. Yet the regime has been fighting the image of a nation crippled by an epidemic as much as it has been fighting the coronavirus itself. Speaking at a national headquarters established to deal with the virus, Rouhani said, “In schools, high schools, universities, and workplaces, everybody should pay attention to health recommendations. But we must all continue our work and activities, because it is one of the enemies’ plots to spread fear in our country and close down the country.”
The ailing deputy health minister was more candid. “I’m saying this deep from my heart . . . take care of yourselves,” Harirchi said in a video that he posted from quarantine. “This is a democratic virus, and it doesn’t distinguish between poor and rich, statesman and an ordinary citizen. It may infect a number of people.” In the Islamic Republic, that number may be frighteningly large.
 

Angry New Ager

Farting for God soon
True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
/raises hand.

This looks terrifying, does it not? But strip away the panicky sensationalist news headlines and think about it for just a minute. Yes it might be Coronavirus, It could also be any other seasonal bug tearing through a Nursing Home.
And it could be something entirely unrelated to the coronavirus or any of the flu bugs going around. Having lived across the street from an assisted living facility and its attached nursing home, I can say that people getting hauled out in an ambulance is at least a daily occurrence when you have lots of frail, elderly people living in one place. Irregular heartbeat; diabetic complications; dizziness; falls; events that may or may not be a stroke; shortness of breath; and, yes, influenza or other infectious illness are all reasons to call for an ambulance.

We don't know why that particular individual is on their way to the hospital, and we won't thanks to patient privacy laws. Most people will assume it's because of coronavirus-related pneumonia, because that's what the headlines are blaring about, but it might be something entirely different. After all, 75% of the residents don't have pneumonia, but they've still got something failing on them.

ETA:
I've actually heard some gabapentin chatter recently. Seems that the vet industry (in my area anyway) has been experiencing some delays in restocking gab for the past 3-4 weeks. Annoyingly delayed, but not yet serious.
That's happened before. Another one that my vets have occasionally had difficulty restocking is Lactated Ringer's Solution, especially during a really bad flu season. Apparently, human healthcare gets priority in order fulfillment over vet med, which comes as no surprise, really.

So it was fun trying to find supplies to care for a cat with kidney failure not long after the hurricane in Puerto Rico knocked the one North American plant producing LRS out of commission (the other was being rebuilt to meet new FDA standards); I ended up getting it from a hospital pharmacy for like $15/bag. Even regular human pharmacies like Walgreens and Costco were backordered, without even a promised delivery date, but hospital pharmacies had it. So in a pinch, I can go that route. It'll be more expensive, but at least it's dirt cheap as far as pharmaceuticals go.
 
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LemmeSee

kiwifarms.net
Anyone else think some of those Iranian recovereds could have been false positives that later tested negative? If I were in charge of managing this PR shitshow I'd definitely classify them like that.
 

DNA_JACKED

kiwifarms.net
And it could be something entirely unrelated to the coronavirus or any of the flu bugs going around. Having lived across the street from an assisted living facility and its attached nursing home, I can say that people getting hauled out in an ambulance is at least a daily occurrence when you have lots of frail, elderly people living in one place. Irregular heartbeat; diabetic complications; dizziness; falls; events that may or may not be a stroke; shortness of breath; and, yes, influenza or other infectious illness are all reasons to call for an ambulance.

We don't know why that particular individual is on their way to the hospital, and we won't thanks to patient privacy laws. Most people will assume it's because of coronavirus-related pneumonia, because that's what the headlines are blaring about, but it might be something entirely different. After all, 75% of the residents don't have pneumonia, but they've still got something failing on them.
Except its been confirmed now the firefighters involved have been quarantined for coming into contact with a corona-virus patient. This is why you should be treating any pneumonia cases as potential attack vectors these days, this virus is just EVERYWHERE.
 

RodgerDodger

True & Honest Fan
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And it could be something entirely unrelated to the coronavirus or any of the flu bugs going around. Having lived across the street from an assisted living facility and its attached nursing home, I can say that people getting hauled out in an ambulance is at least a daily occurrence when you have lots of frail, elderly people living in one place. Irregular heartbeat; diabetic complications; dizziness; falls; events that may or may not be a stroke; shortness of breath; and, yes, influenza or other infectious illness are all reasons to call for an ambulance.

We don't know why that particular individual is on their way to the hospital, and we won't thanks to patient privacy laws. Most people will assume it's because of coronavirus-related pneumonia, because that's what the headlines are blaring about, but it might be something entirely different. After all, 75% of the residents don't have pneumonia, but they've still got something failing on them.

Daily? It's an hourly occurrence. And as much as I hate to say this, (and while this has nothing to do with this apparent EMS call) Nursing home staff often have no qualms about shipping a certain number of their residents off to the ER for Chest X-Ray and evaluations, for a few hours, should they happen to be short staffed, overworked, or just plain lazy. This is especially prone to happen right around a shift change in the evenings. Yeah Health Care providers are human too. Which means a given number of them are lazy conniving sociopaths. Just like the asshole you sit next to at work. And unlike many other industries which remarkably tend to congregate said sociopaths near the top of the food chain, the Health Care industry seemingly filters them out down towards the bottom. They don't tend to survive long in mainline hospitals or private practice medical offices. They will end up becoming more concentrated in Nursing Homes weighted ever more heavily towards the lower quality ones, before falling to psych facilities, with the final place of "no shits will be given" the VA facilities.

As for this case. I've seen some reports that it is, or is assumed to be Coronavirus and the Fire personnel have been quarantined. Which raises all new problems. The disease vector in the Nursing Home is all too obvious. It likely came in either with one of the Nurses, as many nurses will work as Per Diem contractors, so they may be on a Hospitals Med/Surg floors one day, and covering a few shifts at a nursing home another. Or it may have come back with a patient from a local Hospital. Like I said they get sent out all the time for routine stuff, plus they will often be sent back still sick. Because the Nursing Homes will only hold the beds for so many days once a resident is hospitalized. Not to mention the old Medicaire shuffle. Medicaire will only pay for so many days continuous hospitalization. So they discharge the patient back to the nursing home. The nursing home waits an hour or two and sends them back, thus making it a new Hospital visit and resetting the Medicaire clock.

The big takeaway, and the most likely horrifying conclusion is that it is already in the staff and patients of at least one Washington Hospital.
 
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greengrilledcheese

Free, White, and 21
True & Honest Fan
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Coronavirus rumors spread on app cripple LA’s Koreatown
https://apnews.com/bdd9d19f2fa9ded405e54cc1dcd9bd34 (http://archive.vn/AHL46)


LOS ANGELES (AP) — In a Koreatown restaurant known for its beef bone broth soup, the lunchtime crowd Friday was half its normal size. The reason was a virulent rumor about a customer with coronavirus.

Han Bat Shul Lung Tang was one of five restaurants that lost business after being named in posts on a Korean messaging app that warned a Korean Air flight attendant with the virus had dined there during a layover in Los Angeles more than a week ago.

“It’s fake news,” owner John Kim said, and he had proof. His restaurant was closed at the time because of a water leak, a fact confirmed by the Department of Public Health.

The rumor about the flight attendant was dispelled Friday morning by the Republic of Korea consulate in Los Angeles. In a statement posted in Korean on Facebook, the consulate general said the attendant who visited Los Angeles on Feb. 19-20 had gone to two businesses but neither was in Koreatown. Later in the day, public health officials said the flight attendant was not contagious while in the city.

The rumor and the impact on the restaurants was a prime example of how fears of the virus combined with the speed and reach of social media can quickly cripple the healthiest of businesses and focus suspicion on ethnic communities.

The virus, which began in China, has been spreading worldwide and has taken a big toll lately in South Korea. Lawmakers and advocates for immigrant communities have warned about xenophobia and discrimination aimed at Asian Americans.

State Assemblyman Kansen Chu, D-San Jose, said Chinese businesses, in particular, were experiencing large economic losses as a result of racism and fear.

A group representing Koreatown restaurants said business in general was down about 50% since the rumor spread on the Kakao Talk app on Monday.

One message circulating on the app provided details of the flights the attendant worked on and listed the restaurants that said she purportedly visited with the message: “Please share with everyone to avoid these ktown spots,” using an abbreviation for Koreatown.

“In the Korean-American community here, it went like wildfire,” Alex Won said Friday as he ate a bowl of beef brisket soup at Han Bat Shul Lung Tang. “It’s sad.”

Won said he got the message from friends and family members, but never really believed it because it wasn’t reported in the news. He stopped at the restaurant at the start of the week and found it closed because of a water leak. He was happy to return for a late lunch Friday and was surprised to find he was the only diner.

“I’ve never seen it this empty,” he said. “There’s always people here.”

Owners of other restaurants named in the post said business died almost instantly.

At Honey Pig, a Korean barbecue restaurant with 25 tables, only six parties were seated during one bad day of business this week, owner Chin Kim said.

Customers had been calling to inquire if the rumors were true, and some asked more outlandish questions, Kim said. One woman who had dined at the restaurant recently called to ask if it was safe to attend her daughter’s upcoming wedding, Kim said.

Owners were frustrated they couldn’t get more information from public health officials. Korean news media reported Thursday that South Korea’s Centers for Disease Control and Prevention confirmed a female flight attendant who tested positive for the virus had traveled to Los Angeles.

The Los Angeles County Department of Public Health said it was aware of reports about the flight attendant but had no confirmation from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention until late Friday. That’s when it said she did not develop symptoms of the illness known as COVID-19 until after leaving LA, so she posed no risk while in the city.

With a rumor they couldn’t confirm or deny, some restaurants took no chances. Video circulated on social media of a worker in a hazmat-type suit spraying down the floors at Hangari Kalguksu, a noodle soup house.

The sign outside Hanshin Pocha, a bar offering traditional Korean snack fare, boasts “never been closed since 1998.” Nevertheless, the establishment shuttered Tuesday to sanitize the restaurant. Bottles of hand sanitizer were lined up on a counter next to bottled water.

“It’s a bad rumor, but people like bad rumors,” said Jay Choi, manager of Hanshin Pocha.

Choi and others talked about the need to find and punish the person who started the rumor. He said he was looking into hiring a lawyer to take legal action.

On the streets of Koreatown, some pedestrians wore surgical masks. But they were not the norm.

Zhang Bin, a college student from China, and his roommate have worn the masks for protection since the virus broke out.

“I think even if the stewardess didn’t come to the restaurants, we still need to protect from the virus,” he said. “The speed and the spread of the disease is so fast.”

-----



On the topic of prepping, I'm going to skip the usual suggestions and give a couple of less common but still useful ones. You may need to spend some time travelling in your car due to unforseen circumstances. Here's two things that could come in handy and will only set you back $20 for both:

Cobra Products PST154 4-Way Sillcock Key https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0002YVMEM/

In the past, most gas stations or buildings in general had a faucet that was easily accessible by any passerby. Those days are mostly long gone, especially in urban areas. With this tool, you can easily access the faucet located behind those locked covers and turn it on to get water for your pet/car/etc. Comes in very handy when you're travelling at night and all of the gas stations/stores you come across are closed.


Morakniv Companion Fixed Blade Outdoor Knife with Sandvik Stainless Steel Blade, 4.1-Inch, Black https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00BTJKB00/

For a $15 fixed blade, these knives can't be beat. The quality is on a level well above the purchase price and they're made in Sweden (not China like most cheap blades). Just be careful because these do arrive sharp from the factory. I don't think I need to list all of the reasons a knife is handy to keep in your vehicle.
 

Dolphin Lundgren

True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
Warning: slight power level
I would wager more than a few kiwis might take one of these too. I know adderall gets a bad rap here, but there are conditions that absolutely require it as treatment, and not just to study for finals. I know people on benzos that are absolutely homicidal if they miss even a day.

Should I call up my doc and ask for early refills? Several of these meds are controlled substances, so I'm really doubtful they would provide a script. I dont want to come off as paranoid either, since my doc is a boomer and I'm quite sure he would see it as that.

Another fellow medication taker here. Sure, ask your doctor for a few refills. I never had drama getting scripts for Adderall when I took it. They'll most likely give you a few if you explain why you want it. Maybe try to get generics if you really want to get some easier. I've gotten generics and the generics I take are made in India, not China. India does generics.
It's smart to stock up on your medication and your doctor should understand it. From what I experienced though, psychiatric generics were easier to take and easier to arrange with a doctor. Not sure how others worked.
 
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DerSandstrom

Shocked Mormon of Color, pronouns are fuck/you
kiwifarms.net
Shit might be getting real. Just a rumor, but that they're even putting this out there...

New York Stock Exchange considers shutting trading floor amid coronavirus fears as Wall Street firms tell workers to prepare to work from home
  • The New York Stock Exchange is considering closing its trading floor amid concerns the conoravirus outbreak will spread into a wider pandemic
  • Wall Street firms already have started restricting travel and advising workers they may have to work from home
  • Most trading is done electronically and few traders actually still report to the trading floor, which is closed and will not reopen until Monday
The New York Stock Exchange is considering shutting its trading floor amid panic the spread of coronavirus could lead to a global economic disaster.
'NYSE preparing for possibility floor can't open amid panic,' Fox News reporter Charles Gasparino tweeted just before the markets closed on Friday.
Wall Street firms are also restricting travel and telling employees they may have to work from home, Gaparino said.
Fox News reporter Charles Gasparino tweeted about the possible closure of the trading floor just before markets closed on Friday
 <img id="i-36e2cd4e20380f81" src="https://i.dailymail.co.uk/1s/2020/02/28/22/25340224-8058017-image-a-6_1582930504635.jpg" height="262" width="634" alt="Fox News reporter Charles Gasparino tweeted about the possible closure of the trading floor just before markets closed on Friday" class="blkBorder img-share" /> 

Fox News reporter Charles Gasparino tweeted about the possible closure of the trading floor just before markets closed on Friday
The New York Stock Exchange is preparing for the chance that it may have to shut its trading floor amid a panic the coronavirus could spread into a wider pandemic. The exterior of the exchange is pictured on Manhattan's Wall Street Friday
 <img id="i-ba45134e799fcd4b" src="https://i.dailymail.co.uk/1s/2020/02/28/22/25340156-8058017-image-a-1_1582930267158.jpg" height="423" width="634" alt="The New York Stock Exchange is preparing for the chance that it may have to shut its trading floor amid a panic the coronavirus could spread into a wider pandemic. The exterior of the exchange is pictured on Manhattan's Wall Street Friday" class="blkBorder img-share" /> <span class="fr-marker" style="display: none; line-height: 0;" data-type="true" data-id="0"></span><span class="fr-marker" style="display: none; line-height: 0;" data-type="false" data-id="0"></span>
The New York Stock Exchange is preparing for the chance that it may have to shut its trading floor amid a panic the coronavirus could spread into a wider pandemic. The exterior of the exchange is pictured on Manhattan's Wall Street Friday
The exchange is considering its options as worries over the virus becoming a pandemic could lead to a financial economic disaster. Traders are pictured during the opening bell
 <img id="i-42f310f8913bdd30" src="https://i.dailymail.co.uk/1s/2020/02/28/22/25340138-8058017-image-a-3_1582930280178.jpg" height="424" width="634" alt="The exchange is considering its options as worries over the virus becoming a pandemic could lead to a financial economic disaster. Traders are pictured during the opening bell" class="blkBorder img-share" /> <span class="fr-marker" style="display: none; line-height: 0;" data-type="true" data-id="0"></span><span class="fr-marker" style="display: none; line-height: 0;" data-type="false" data-id="0"></span>
The exchange is considering its options as worries over the virus becoming a pandemic could lead to a financial economic disaster. Traders are pictured during the opening bell
Traders are pictured on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange, which is now closed and is not expected to reopen until Monday
 <img id="i-541a88e53d863f62" src="https://i.dailymail.co.uk/1s/2020/02/28/23/25340140-8058017-image-a-15_1582932415395.jpg" height="424" width="634" alt="Traders are pictured on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange, which is now closed and is not expected to reopen until Monday" class="blkBorder img-share" /> <span class="fr-marker" style="display: none; line-height: 0;" data-type="true" data-id="0"></span><span class="fr-marker" style="display: none; line-height: 0;" data-type="false" data-id="0"></span>
Traders are pictured on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange, which is now closed and is not expected to reopen until Monday
A tourist is spotted wearing a anti-viral mask outside the New York Stock Exchange. Wall Street firms have begun restricting travel and telling employees they may have to work from home
 <img id="i-75b615f8c03e8d82" src="https://i.dailymail.co.uk/1s/2020/02/28/22/25340154-8058017-image-a-4_1582930298705.jpg" height="423" width="634" alt="A tourist is spotted wearing a anti-viral mask outside the New York Stock Exchange. Wall Street firms have begun restricting travel and telling employees they may have to work from home" class="blkBorder img-share" /> 

A tourist is spotted wearing a anti-viral mask outside the New York Stock Exchange. Wall Street firms have begun restricting travel and telling employees they may have to work from home
A spokesperson confirmed to DailyMail.com that 'NYSE is carefully monitoring the spread of COVID-19 and has robust contingency plans, tested regularly, to enable continuous operation of the NYSE exchanges should any facilities be impacted.'
25342396-8058017-image-a-4_1582934995748.jpg
 <img id="i-37e1e680b9972f2a" src="https://i.dailymail.co.uk/1s/2020/02/29/00/25342396-8058017-image-a-4_1582934995748.jpg" height="137" width="306" alt="" class="blkBorder img-share" /> <span class="fr-marker" style="display: none; line-height: 0;" data-type="true" data-id="0"></span><span class="fr-marker" style="display: none; line-height: 0;" data-type="false" data-id="0"></span>

The exchange floor was shut down after markets closed Friday, and was not expected to reopen until Monday.

US stock indexes fell sharply again on Friday as the rapidly spreading coronavirus outbreak raised the alarm for a possible global recession.
The Dow Jones Industrial average was down 357 points at the closing bell, or 1.4 percent, marking seven straight days of losses and the biggest weekly drop since the 2008 global financial crisis

A board from the trading floor of the New York Stock Exchange on Friday. US stock indexes fell sharply again as the rapidly spreading coronavirus outbreak raised the alarm for a possible global recession
 <img id="i-e0aa53d05bc9a922" src="https://i.dailymail.co.uk/1s/2020/02/28/23/25340148-8058017-image-a-7_1582931303625.jpg" height="423" width="634" alt="A board from the trading floor of the New York Stock Exchange on Friday. US stock indexes fell sharply again as the rapidly spreading coronavirus outbreak raised the alarm for a possible global recession" class="blkBorder img-share" /> <span class="fr-marker" style="display: none; line-height: 0;" data-type="true" data-id="0"></span><span class="fr-marker" style="display: none; line-height: 0;" data-type="false" data-id="0"></span>

A board from the trading floor of the New York Stock Exchange on Friday. US stock indexes fell sharply again as the rapidly spreading coronavirus outbreak raised the alarm for a possible global recession.
The Dow Jones Industrial average was down 357 points at the closing bell, or 1.4 percent, marking seven straight days of losses and the biggest weekly drop since the 2008 global financial crisis
 <img id="i-42c45bc48283f40f" src="https://i.dailymail.co.uk/1s/2020/02/28/23/25340220-8058017-image-a-8_1582932358672.jpg" height="524" width="634" alt="The Dow Jones Industrial average was down 357 points at the closing bell, or 1.4 percent, marking seven straight days of losses and the biggest weekly drop since the 2008 global financial crisis" class="blkBorder img-share" /> 

The Dow Jones Industrial average was down 357 points at the closing bell, or 1.4 percent, marking seven straight days of losses and the biggest weekly drop since the 2008 global financial crisis
25342458-8058017-image-a-1_1582934960487.jpg
 <img id="i-7d79e03608a51733" src="https://i.dailymail.co.uk/1s/2020/02/29/00/25342458-8058017-image-a-1_1582934960487.jpg" height="634" width="634" alt="" class="blkBorder img-share" /> 

Investors are reeling after virus fears wiped nearly $3 trillion off the combined market value of S&P 500 companies this week, with the index confirming its fastest correction in history in volatile trading on Thursday.
Globally, some $6 trillion, or about 10 percent, has been erased from stock values as markets in Asia and Europe plunged on fears that the outbreak will shrivel corporate profits there. At their heart, stock prices are determined by expectations of a company's future profits.
Even as the outbreak eases in China, investors have been rattled by the rapid spread of the disease in other countries, which now account for about three-quarters of new infections.

Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell indicated the central bank was prepared to cut interest rates as necessary to help cushion the economy against the effects of the spreading virus.
'The fundamentals of the US economy remain strong,' he said in a statement released on Friday. 'However, the coronavirus poses evolving risks to economic activity.'
'The Federal Reserve is closely monitoring developments and their implications for the economic outlook,' he said. 'We will use our tools and act as appropriate to support the economy.'
 

Sissy Galvez

True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
Coronavirus rumors spread on app cripple LA’s Koreatown
https://apnews.com/bdd9d19f2fa9ded405e54cc1dcd9bd34 (http://archive.vn/AHL46)


LOS ANGELES (AP) — In a Koreatown restaurant known for its beef bone broth soup, the lunchtime crowd Friday was half its normal size. The reason was a virulent rumor about a customer with coronavirus.

Han Bat Shul Lung Tang was one of five restaurants that lost business after being named in posts on a Korean messaging app that warned a Korean Air flight attendant with the virus had dined there during a layover in Los Angeles more than a week ago.

“It’s fake news,” owner John Kim said, and he had proof. His restaurant was closed at the time because of a water leak, a fact confirmed by the Department of Public Health.

The rumor about the flight attendant was dispelled Friday morning by the Republic of Korea consulate in Los Angeles. In a statement posted in Korean on Facebook, the consulate general said the attendant who visited Los Angeles on Feb. 19-20 had gone to two businesses but neither was in Koreatown. Later in the day, public health officials said the flight attendant was not contagious while in the city.

The rumor and the impact on the restaurants was a prime example of how fears of the virus combined with the speed and reach of social media can quickly cripple the healthiest of businesses and focus suspicion on ethnic communities.

The virus, which began in China, has been spreading worldwide and has taken a big toll lately in South Korea. Lawmakers and advocates for immigrant communities have warned about xenophobia and discrimination aimed at Asian Americans.

State Assemblyman Kansen Chu, D-San Jose, said Chinese businesses, in particular, were experiencing large economic losses as a result of racism and fear.

A group representing Koreatown restaurants said business in general was down about 50% since the rumor spread on the Kakao Talk app on Monday.

One message circulating on the app provided details of the flights the attendant worked on and listed the restaurants that said she purportedly visited with the message: “Please share with everyone to avoid these ktown spots,” using an abbreviation for Koreatown.

“In the Korean-American community here, it went like wildfire,” Alex Won said Friday as he ate a bowl of beef brisket soup at Han Bat Shul Lung Tang. “It’s sad.”

Won said he got the message from friends and family members, but never really believed it because it wasn’t reported in the news. He stopped at the restaurant at the start of the week and found it closed because of a water leak. He was happy to return for a late lunch Friday and was surprised to find he was the only diner.

“I’ve never seen it this empty,” he said. “There’s always people here.”

Owners of other restaurants named in the post said business died almost instantly.

At Honey Pig, a Korean barbecue restaurant with 25 tables, only six parties were seated during one bad day of business this week, owner Chin Kim said.

Customers had been calling to inquire if the rumors were true, and some asked more outlandish questions, Kim said. One woman who had dined at the restaurant recently called to ask if it was safe to attend her daughter’s upcoming wedding, Kim said.

Owners were frustrated they couldn’t get more information from public health officials. Korean news media reported Thursday that South Korea’s Centers for Disease Control and Prevention confirmed a female flight attendant who tested positive for the virus had traveled to Los Angeles.

The Los Angeles County Department of Public Health said it was aware of reports about the flight attendant but had no confirmation from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention until late Friday. That’s when it said she did not develop symptoms of the illness known as COVID-19 until after leaving LA, so she posed no risk while in the city.

With a rumor they couldn’t confirm or deny, some restaurants took no chances. Video circulated on social media of a worker in a hazmat-type suit spraying down the floors at Hangari Kalguksu, a noodle soup house.

The sign outside Hanshin Pocha, a bar offering traditional Korean snack fare, boasts “never been closed since 1998.” Nevertheless, the establishment shuttered Tuesday to sanitize the restaurant. Bottles of hand sanitizer were lined up on a counter next to bottled water.

“It’s a bad rumor, but people like bad rumors,” said Jay Choi, manager of Hanshin Pocha.

Choi and others talked about the need to find and punish the person who started the rumor. He said he was looking into hiring a lawyer to take legal action.

On the streets of Koreatown, some pedestrians wore surgical masks. But they were not the norm.

Zhang Bin, a college student from China, and his roommate have worn the masks for protection since the virus broke out.

“I think even if the stewardess didn’t come to the restaurants, we still need to protect from the virus,” he said. “The speed and the spread of the disease is so fast.”

-----



On the topic of prepping, I'm going to skip the usual suggestions and give a couple of less common but still useful ones. You may need to spend some time travelling in your car due to unforseen circumstances. Here's two things that could come in handy and will only set you back $20 for both:

Cobra Products PST154 4-Way Sillcock Key https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0002YVMEM/

In the past, most gas stations or buildings in general had a faucet that was easily accessible by any passerby. Those days are mostly long gone, especially in urban areas. With this tool, you can easily access the faucet located behind those locked covers and turn it on to get water for your pet/car/etc. Comes in very handy when you're travelling at night and all of the gas stations/stores you come across are closed.


Morakniv Companion Fixed Blade Outdoor Knife with Sandvik Stainless Steel Blade, 4.1-Inch, Black https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00BTJKB00/

For a $15 fixed blade, these knives can't be beat. The quality is on a level well above the purchase price and they're made in Sweden (not China like most cheap blades). Just be careful because these do arrive sharp from the factory. I don't think I need to list all of the reasons a knife is handy to keep in your vehicle.
I still don’t understand the leap in logic from “coronavirus infected person dines at establishment and potentially infects servers and customers so we shouldn’t eat there” to “das racist towards Asians!!”. Like wtf, first you want people to protect themselves and self-isolate then you tell them “go dine with potentially infected people”. It has nothing to do with their race but who ate there and where potential travelers came from (liter hot zones).
 

Glad I couldn't help

Oh hai
kiwifarms.net
NYT piece on how quarantines and travel restrictions are a useful tool in fighting infectious diseases. Note that while I agree with the trust of the article, I am more dubious about the stats that Cuba and China dole out.

NEWS ANALYSIS
To Take On the Coronavirus, Go Medieval on It
Quarantines and restrictive measures served a purpose in the old days. They can now, too.

Donald G. McNeil Jr.
By Donald G. McNeil Jr.
Mr. McNeil is a science reporter for The New York Times and has covered epidemics since 2002.
Feb. 28, 2020

There are two ways to fight epidemics: the medieval and the modern.
The modern way is to surrender to the power of the pathogens: Acknowledge that they are unstoppable and to try to soften the blow with 20th-century inventions, including new vaccines, antibiotics, hospital ventilators and thermal cameras searching for people with fevers.
The medieval way, inherited from the era of the Black Death, is brutal: Close the borders, quarantine the ships, pen terrified citizens up inside their poisoned cities.
For the first time in more than a century, the world has chosen to confront a new and terrifying virus with the iron fist instead of the latex glove.
At least for a while, it worked, and it might still serve a purpose.
The Chinese leader, Xi Jinping, was able to seal off the city of Wuhan, where the Covid-19 outbreak began, because China is a place where a leader can ask himself, “What would Mao do?” and just do it. The bureaucracy will comply, right down to the neighborhood committees that bar anyone returning from Wuhan from entering their own homes, even if it means sleeping in the streets.

The White House, in defiance of recent American history, also opted to go medieval by aggressive measures like barring entry to non-Americans who were recently in China and advising Americans not to go to China or South Korea.
Over the years, states and cities have imposed local quarantines, but there have been no national restrictions on entry since 1892, according to Dr. Howard Markel, a medical historian and the author of “Quarantine!”

In that year, President Benjamin Harrison ordered that all ships from Hamburg be kept offshore for 20 days because officials in that city, one of the world’s biggest ports, had lied about its cholera epidemic.
It apparently succeeded. The United States had cholera outbreaks in 1832, 1849, 1870 and 1910, but not in 1892.
Many public health figures consider shutting a nation’s doors to be an archaic tactic, and nearly impossible in the jet age.

But for Mr. Trump, such a move is natural. He was elected on a Build-the-Wall platform and in 2014, when a few heroic American medical workers got infected fighting Ebola in West Africa, he advocated leaving them there to die. (They were flown back, and survived.)

Also, this virus’s speed and apparent lethality gave the experienced doctors in the White House Coronavirus Task Force reason to be nervous. It is spreading between nations very quickly. And, while data is still sketchy, some measurements indicate that its fatality rate might be close to that of the 1918 Spanish flu.
As a result, they endorsed dropping the portcullis and shutting off air links to China.
They even created quarantine stations on military bases, the equivalent of Venice’s island lazarettos, where, in the time of the doges, the infected awaited their fate outside the city.
This has led to much consternation among other public health experts, who argue that travel restrictions can cause more panic, misery and death than they prevent. Crowds may besiege hospitals, supercharging the infection rate. Closed borders can cut off vital medications like insulin. Factory and shop closings mean lost wages, hardships and possibly recession.
Also, quarantines feed racism and stigma.
Officially, the World Health Organization opposes travel and trade restrictions. It reiterated that even as it declared the epidemic a global emergency on Jan. 30.
But it now admits that they helped. The head of the W.H.O. team that visited China said this week that China “took one of the most ancient strategies and rolled out one of the most ambitious, agile and aggressive disease-containment efforts in history.”
The W.H.O.’s epidemic-modeling teams concluded that travel restrictions had slowed the spread of the virus outside China by two to three weeks.

For the United States, the delay was probably far greater. Air-traffic data shows that flights from China to the United States dropped much more than they did to Europe.
As of this writing, a single case not connected to any known transmission has turned up in California, but there are no indications of large outbreaks like those in Italy and Iran.
Harsh measures horrify civil libertarians, but they often save lives, especially when they are imposed in the early days.
The best-known modern example is Cuba’s AIDS epidemic. In the 1980s, Cuba and the United States were both hit hard by the AIDS epidemic. In Cuba, the virus first infected thousands of soldiers, doctors and nurses who had served in Africa.
The Castro regime’s response — roundly condemned by other countries — was to make H.I.V. tests mandatory, and to force everyone infected into quarantine camps. The camps were not hellholes: they had bungalows, gardens, theater troupes, medical care, more food than people outside often had, and less homophobia than gay men often faced in macho rural Cuba. But no one could leave, except for brief family visits with an escort whose main job was to make sure that no sex took place.
Meanwhile, the United States took a pro-legal-rights approach. Even offering an H.I.V. test was made illegal without a separate counseling session, which scared many away from testing. Although gay bathhouses were epicenters of transmission, there were long divisive fights over closing them.
After triple therapy was developed in the mid-1990s, most Cuban camps closed.
But the difference in lives saved by choosing brutality over freedom was stark: Cuba’s H.I.V. infection rate was for decades about one-sixth that of the American one. New York City and Cuba have roughly the same population. In the epidemic’s first 30 years, fewer than 2,500 Cubans died of AIDS. Over 78,000 New Yorkers — mostly gay men — did.


As the virus creeps closer, stark choices will arise. The United States cannot shut out the whole world. Even if all air travel were stopped, the virus could reach Latin America or Canada and enter over our land borders.
With luck, the extra time that China bought us by falling on its viral grenade will help produce a treatment or a vaccine. The threat will subside and reporters like me will be accused of alarmism.
Top American health officials now say “it is not a matter of if but when” the virus begins to spread here. But the American experience will not echo the Chinese one.
China has had imperial rule since 221 B.C. The United States, born of rebellion, prizes individual rights.
There will be no national lockdown. No threats to have anyone “forever nailed to history’s pillar of shame,” as one of Mr. Xi’s underlings warned those who hid cases of infection.
But local control — and the political factionalism that is endemic to democracy — can carry grave risks in the face of a crisis, Dr. Markel noted.
In 1918 and 1919, as the Spanish influenza swept across the country in waves, various cities reacted in their own ways.


Cities like St. Louis that reacted quickly — canceling parades and ballgames, shutting schools, transit systems and government offices, ordering the sick to stay home — ultimately had fewer deaths.
In cities like Philadelphia and Pittsburgh, which were paralyzed by political feuds or pressure from local businesses to avoid shutdowns, many more ultimately died.
To overcome the divisiveness that would imperil a cohesive national response, Dr. Markel said, “you need leadership from the top — and there has to be trust. In an epidemic, the idea that ‘everyone is entitled to their own facts’ is really dangerous.”
The Times is committed to publishing a diversity of letters to the editor. We’d like to hear what you think about this or any of our articles. Here are some tips. And here’s our email: letters@nytimes.com.
Follow The New York Times Opinion section on
Facebook, Twitter (@NYTopinion) and Instagram.

Donald G. McNeil Jr. is a science reporter covering epidemics and diseases of the world’s poor. He joined The Times in 1976, and has reported from 60 countries.
A version of this article appears in print on March 1, 2020, Section SR, Page 3 of the New York edition with the headline: To Take On the Coronavirus, Go Medieval on It. Order Reprints | Today’s Paper | Subscribe
 
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