Wuhan Coronavirus: Megathread -

Which country(ies) will fare the worst due to the WuFlu?


  • Total voters
    2,278

ditto

kiwifarms.net
Shit might be getting real. Just a rumor, but that they're even putting this out there...

New York Stock Exchange considers shutting trading floor amid coronavirus fears as Wall Street firms tell workers to prepare to work from home
  • The New York Stock Exchange is considering closing its trading floor amid concerns the conoravirus outbreak will spread into a wider pandemic
  • Wall Street firms already have started restricting travel and advising workers they may have to work from home
  • Most trading is done electronically and few traders actually still report to the trading floor, which is closed and will not reopen until Monday
The New York Stock Exchange is considering shutting its trading floor amid panic the spread of coronavirus could lead to a global economic disaster.
'NYSE preparing for possibility floor can't open amid panic,' Fox News reporter Charles Gasparino tweeted just before the markets closed on Friday.
Wall Street firms are also restricting travel and telling employees they may have to work from home, Gaparino said.
Fox News reporter Charles Gasparino tweeted about the possible closure of the trading floor just before markets closed on Friday
 <img id="i-36e2cd4e20380f81" src="https://i.dailymail.co.uk/1s/2020/02/28/22/25340224-8058017-image-a-6_1582930504635.jpg" height="262" width="634" alt="Fox News reporter Charles Gasparino tweeted about the possible closure of the trading floor just before markets closed on Friday" class="blkBorder img-share" /> 

Fox News reporter Charles Gasparino tweeted about the possible closure of the trading floor just before markets closed on Friday
The New York Stock Exchange is preparing for the chance that it may have to shut its trading floor amid a panic the coronavirus could spread into a wider pandemic. The exterior of the exchange is pictured on Manhattan's Wall Street Friday's Wall Street Friday
 <img id="i-ba45134e799fcd4b" src="https://i.dailymail.co.uk/1s/2020/02/28/22/25340156-8058017-image-a-1_1582930267158.jpg" height="423" width="634" alt="The New York Stock Exchange is preparing for the chance that it may have to shut its trading floor amid a panic the coronavirus could spread into a wider pandemic. The exterior of the exchange is pictured on Manhattan's Wall Street Friday" class="blkBorder img-share" /> <span class="fr-marker" style="display: none; line-height: 0;" data-type="true" data-id="0"></span><span class="fr-marker" style="display: none; line-height: 0;" data-type="false" data-id="0"></span>
The New York Stock Exchange is preparing for the chance that it may have to shut its trading floor amid a panic the coronavirus could spread into a wider pandemic. The exterior of the exchange is pictured on Manhattan's Wall Street Friday
The exchange is considering its options as worries over the virus becoming a pandemic could lead to a financial economic disaster. Traders are pictured during the opening bell
 <img id="i-42f310f8913bdd30" src="https://i.dailymail.co.uk/1s/2020/02/28/22/25340138-8058017-image-a-3_1582930280178.jpg" height="424" width="634" alt="The exchange is considering its options as worries over the virus becoming a pandemic could lead to a financial economic disaster. Traders are pictured during the opening bell" class="blkBorder img-share" /> <span class="fr-marker" style="display: none; line-height: 0;" data-type="true" data-id="0"></span><span class="fr-marker" style="display: none; line-height: 0;" data-type="false" data-id="0"></span>
The exchange is considering its options as worries over the virus becoming a pandemic could lead to a financial economic disaster. Traders are pictured during the opening bell
Traders are pictured on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange, which is now closed and is not expected to reopen until Monday
 <img id="i-541a88e53d863f62" src="https://i.dailymail.co.uk/1s/2020/02/28/23/25340140-8058017-image-a-15_1582932415395.jpg" height="424" width="634" alt="Traders are pictured on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange, which is now closed and is not expected to reopen until Monday" class="blkBorder img-share" /> <span class="fr-marker" style="display: none; line-height: 0;" data-type="true" data-id="0"></span><span class="fr-marker" style="display: none; line-height: 0;" data-type="false" data-id="0"></span>
Traders are pictured on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange, which is now closed and is not expected to reopen until Monday
A tourist is spotted wearing a anti-viral mask outside the New York Stock Exchange. Wall Street firms have begun restricting travel and telling employees they may have to work from home
 <img id="i-75b615f8c03e8d82" src="https://i.dailymail.co.uk/1s/2020/02/28/22/25340154-8058017-image-a-4_1582930298705.jpg" height="423" width="634" alt="A tourist is spotted wearing a anti-viral mask outside the New York Stock Exchange. Wall Street firms have begun restricting travel and telling employees they may have to work from home" class="blkBorder img-share" /> 

A tourist is spotted wearing a anti-viral mask outside the New York Stock Exchange. Wall Street firms have begun restricting travel and telling employees they may have to work from home
A spokesperson confirmed to DailyMail.com that 'NYSE is carefully monitoring the spread of COVID-19 and has robust contingency plans, tested regularly, to enable continuous operation of the NYSE exchanges should any facilities be impacted.'
25342396-8058017-image-a-4_1582934995748.jpg
 <img id="i-37e1e680b9972f2a" src="https://i.dailymail.co.uk/1s/2020/02/29/00/25342396-8058017-image-a-4_1582934995748.jpg" height="137" width="306" alt="" class="blkBorder img-share" /> <span class="fr-marker" style="display: none; line-height: 0;" data-type="true" data-id="0"></span><span class="fr-marker" style="display: none; line-height: 0;" data-type="false" data-id="0"></span>

The exchange floor was shut down after markets closed Friday, and was not expected to reopen until Monday.

US stock indexes fell sharply again on Friday as the rapidly spreading coronavirus outbreak raised the alarm for a possible global recession.
The Dow Jones Industrial average was down 357 points at the closing bell, or 1.4 percent, marking seven straight days of losses and the biggest weekly drop since the 2008 global financial crisis

A board from the trading floor of the New York Stock Exchange on Friday. US stock indexes fell sharply again as the rapidly spreading coronavirus outbreak raised the alarm for a possible global recession
 <img id="i-e0aa53d05bc9a922" src="https://i.dailymail.co.uk/1s/2020/02/28/23/25340148-8058017-image-a-7_1582931303625.jpg" height="423" width="634" alt="A board from the trading floor of the New York Stock Exchange on Friday. US stock indexes fell sharply again as the rapidly spreading coronavirus outbreak raised the alarm for a possible global recession" class="blkBorder img-share" /> <span class="fr-marker" style="display: none; line-height: 0;" data-type="true" data-id="0"></span><span class="fr-marker" style="display: none; line-height: 0;" data-type="false" data-id="0"></span>

A board from the trading floor of the New York Stock Exchange on Friday. US stock indexes fell sharply again as the rapidly spreading coronavirus outbreak raised the alarm for a possible global recession.
The Dow Jones Industrial average was down 357 points at the closing bell, or 1.4 percent, marking seven straight days of losses and the biggest weekly drop since the 2008 global financial crisis
 <img id="i-42c45bc48283f40f" src="https://i.dailymail.co.uk/1s/2020/02/28/23/25340220-8058017-image-a-8_1582932358672.jpg" height="524" width="634" alt="The Dow Jones Industrial average was down 357 points at the closing bell, or 1.4 percent, marking seven straight days of losses and the biggest weekly drop since the 2008 global financial crisis" class="blkBorder img-share" /> 

The Dow Jones Industrial average was down 357 points at the closing bell, or 1.4 percent, marking seven straight days of losses and the biggest weekly drop since the 2008 global financial crisis
25342458-8058017-image-a-1_1582934960487.jpg
 <img id="i-7d79e03608a51733" src="https://i.dailymail.co.uk/1s/2020/02/29/00/25342458-8058017-image-a-1_1582934960487.jpg" height="634" width="634" alt="" class="blkBorder img-share" /> 

Investors are reeling after virus fears wiped nearly $3 trillion off the combined market value of S&P 500 companies this week, with the index confirming its fastest correction in history in volatile trading on Thursday.
Globally, some $6 trillion, or about 10 percent, has been erased from stock values as markets in Asia and Europe plunged on fears that the outbreak will shrivel corporate profits there. At their heart, stock prices are determined by expectations of a company's future profits.
Even as the outbreak eases in China, investors have been rattled by the rapid spread of the disease in other countries, which now account for about three-quarters of new infections.

Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell indicated the central bank was prepared to cut interest rates as necessary to help cushion the economy against the effects of the spreading virus.
'The fundamentals of the US economy remain strong,' he said in a statement released on Friday. 'However, the coronavirus poses evolving risks to economic activity.'
'The Federal Reserve is closely monitoring developments and their implications for the economic outlook,' he said. 'We will use our tools and act as appropriate to support the economy.'
Most trading is done by machines in New Jersey anyway. The trading floor is mostly for show.

I'll worry when the president starts coughing and sweating.
 

RodgerDodger

True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
Most trading is done by machines in New Jersey anyway. The trading floor is mostly for show.

I'll worry when the president starts coughing and sweating.
View attachment 1167594

Forget Trump. He can remain pretty isolated. And being a Howard Hughes type Germaphobe he is pretty skilled at it. What are the betting odds on the Dem Candidates and Leadership? What's the Death Pool say about Bernie? Biden? Pelosi? etc? Also if half the California population dies before they finish the 2020 census how many Congressional Seats do they lose?

Every second Corona-Chan becomes more powerful, every moment she grows in strength.

Who will stop her when she reaches her peak?

It will take the power of a GOD
 

ditto

kiwifarms.net
Forget Trump. He can remain pretty isolated. And being a Howard Hughes type Germaphobe he is pretty skilled at it. What are the betting odds on the Dem Candidates and Leadership? What's the Death Pool say about Bernie? Biden? Pelosi? etc? Also if half the California population dies before they finish the 2020 census how many Congressional Seats do they lose?
Probably make big gains. The dead always vote Democrat.
 

TheRedChair

Ultimate Chaos, Ultimate Confort.
kiwifarms.net
I went to Target today to get chocolate chips, and entire sections of the food isles had been cleared out. I'm glad I did all my prepping weeks ago, because people are beginning to panic buy.

View attachment 1167245
View attachment 1167234
This is what I see. Entire sections of cheap shit has been removed. This is nothing fucking new. Even with your own damn picture you just proven it was a standard sale. Why is is there is still food and lots of it... INCLUDING the more expensive items in this picture??? This is fucking common when you have sales when the Ghetto people come out in their fancy ass cars and buy up shit. Seen this happen where I live so Show me something of mass panic items when entire rows of product have been removed from the shelves... THEN you might have something about people panic buying. This is fucking normal where I live.
 

Dolphin Lundgren

True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
Apparently the minister of Singapore held a conference in February about the virus and the transmission.

I'm not sure if it was ever linked, but it was interesting to watch. I don't know if it was linked since this thread goes so fast. If it was, then sorry.

Based on what he said, it seemed like transmission had a better chance of traveling from short distances and airborne had a better chance if infecting with surfaces and touches by hands. This video's been going around recently.
Edit: I am wondering how much truth is in this video.
 
Last edited:

Slap47

Hehe xd
True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
NYT piece on how quarantines and travel restrictions are a useful tool in fighting infectious diseases. Note that while I agree with the trust of the article, I more dubious about the stats that Cuba and China dole out.

NEWS ANALYSIS
To Take On the Coronavirus, Go Medieval on It
Quarantines and restrictive measures served a purpose in the old days. They can now, too.

Donald G. McNeil Jr.
By Donald G. McNeil Jr.
Mr. McNeil is a science reporter for The New York Times and has covered epidemics since 2002.
Feb. 28, 2020

There are two ways to fight epidemics: the medieval and the modern.
The modern way is to surrender to the power of the pathogens: Acknowledge that they are unstoppable and to try to soften the blow with 20th-century inventions, including new vaccines, antibiotics, hospital ventilators and thermal cameras searching for people with fevers.
The medieval way, inherited from the era of the Black Death, is brutal: Close the borders, quarantine the ships, pen terrified citizens up inside their poisoned cities.
For the first time in more than a century, the world has chosen to confront a new and terrifying virus with the iron fist instead of the latex glove.
At least for a while, it worked, and it might still serve a purpose.
The Chinese leader, Xi Jinping, was able to seal off the city of Wuhan, where the Covid-19 outbreak began, because China is a place where a leader can ask himself, “What would Mao do?” and just do it. The bureaucracy will comply, right down to the neighborhood committees that bar anyone returning from Wuhan from entering their own homes, even if it means sleeping in the streets.

The White House, in defiance of recent American history, also opted to go medieval by aggressive measures like barring entry to non-Americans who were recently in China and advising Americans not to go to China or South Korea.
Over the years, states and cities have imposed local quarantines, but there have been no national restrictions on entry since 1892, according to Dr. Howard Markel, a medical historian and the author of “Quarantine!”

In that year, President Benjamin Harrison ordered that all ships from Hamburg be kept offshore for 20 days because officials in that city, one of the world’s biggest ports, had lied about its cholera epidemic.
It apparently succeeded. The United States had cholera outbreaks in 1832, 1849, 1870 and 1910, but not in 1892.
Many public health figures consider shutting a nation’s doors to be an archaic tactic, and nearly impossible in the jet age.

But for Mr. Trump, such a move is natural. He was elected on a Build-the-Wall platform and in 2014, when a few heroic American medical workers got infected fighting Ebola in West Africa, he advocated leaving them there to die. (They were flown back, and survived.)

Also, this virus’s speed and apparent lethality gave the experienced doctors in the White House Coronavirus Task Force reason to be nervous. It is spreading between nations very quickly. And, while data is still sketchy, some measurements indicate that its fatality rate might be close to that of the 1918 Spanish flu.
As a result, they endorsed dropping the portcullis and shutting off air links to China.
They even created quarantine stations on military bases, the equivalent of Venice’s island lazarettos, where, in the time of the doges, the infected awaited their fate outside the city.
This has led to much consternation among other public health experts, who argue that travel restrictions can cause more panic, misery and death than they prevent. Crowds may besiege hospitals, supercharging the infection rate. Closed borders can cut off vital medications like insulin. Factory and shop closings mean lost wages, hardships and possibly recession.
Also, quarantines feed racism and stigma.
Officially, the World Health Organization opposes travel and trade restrictions. It reiterated that even as it declared the epidemic a global emergency on Jan. 30.
But it now admits that they helped. The head of the W.H.O. team that visited China said this week that China “took one of the most ancient strategies and rolled out one of the most ambitious, agile and aggressive disease-containment efforts in history.”
The W.H.O.’s epidemic-modeling teams concluded that travel restrictions had slowed the spread of the virus outside China by two to three weeks.

For the United States, the delay was probably far greater. Air-traffic data shows that flights from China to the United States dropped much more than they did to Europe.
As of this writing, a single case not connected to any known transmission has turned up in California, but there are no indications of large outbreaks like those in Italy and Iran.
Harsh measures horrify civil libertarians, but they often save lives, especially when they are imposed in the early days.
The best-known modern example is Cuba’s AIDS epidemic. In the 1980s, Cuba and the United States were both hit hard by the AIDS epidemic. In Cuba, the virus first infected thousands of soldiers, doctors and nurses who had served in Africa.
The Castro regime’s response — roundly condemned by other countries — was to make H.I.V. tests mandatory, and to force everyone infected into quarantine camps. The camps were not hellholes: they had bungalows, gardens, theater troupes, medical care, more food than people outside often had, and less homophobia than gay men often faced in macho rural Cuba. But no one could leave, except for brief family visits with an escort whose main job was to make sure that no sex took place.
Meanwhile, the United States took a pro-legal-rights approach. Even offering an H.I.V. test was made illegal without a separate counseling session, which scared many away from testing. Although gay bathhouses were epicenters of transmission, there were long divisive fights over closing them.
After triple therapy was developed in the mid-1990s, most Cuban camps closed.
But the difference in lives saved by choosing brutality over freedom was stark: Cuba’s H.I.V. infection rate was for decades about one-sixth that of the American one. New York City and Cuba have roughly the same population. In the epidemic’s first 30 years, fewer than 2,500 Cubans died of AIDS. Over 78,000 New Yorkers — mostly gay men — did.


As the virus creeps closer, stark choices will arise. The United States cannot shut out the whole world. Even if all air travel were stopped, the virus could reach Latin America or Canada and enter over our land borders.
With luck, the extra time that China bought us by falling on its viral grenade will help produce a treatment or a vaccine. The threat will subside and reporters like me will be accused of alarmism.
Top American health officials now say “it is not a matter of if but when” the virus begins to spread here. But the American experience will not echo the Chinese one.
China has had imperial rule since 221 B.C. The United States, born of rebellion, prizes individual rights.
There will be no national lockdown. No threats to have anyone “forever nailed to history’s pillar of shame,” as one of Mr. Xi’s underlings warned those who hid cases of infection.
But local control — and the political factionalism that is endemic to democracy — can carry grave risks in the face of a crisis, Dr. Markel noted.
In 1918 and 1919, as the Spanish influenza swept across the country in waves, various cities reacted in their own ways.


Cities like St. Louis that reacted quickly — canceling parades and ballgames, shutting schools, transit systems and government offices, ordering the sick to stay home — ultimately had fewer deaths.
In cities like Philadelphia and Pittsburgh, which were paralyzed by political feuds or pressure from local businesses to avoid shutdowns, many more ultimately died.
To overcome the divisiveness that would imperil a cohesive national response, Dr. Markel said, “you need leadership from the top — and there has to be trust. In an epidemic, the idea that ‘everyone is entitled to their own facts’ is really dangerous.”
The Times is committed to publishing a diversity of letters to the editor. We’d like to hear what you think about this or any of our articles. Here are some tips. And here’s our email: letters@nytimes.com.
Follow The New York Times Opinion section on
Facebook, Twitter (@NYTopinion) and Instagram.

Donald G. McNeil Jr. is a science reporter covering epidemics and diseases of the world’s poor. He joined The Times in 1976, and has reported from 60 countries.
A version of this article appears in print on March 1, 2020, Section SR, Page 3 of the New York edition with the headline: To Take On the Coronavirus, Go Medieval on It. Order Reprints | Today’s Paper | Subscribe

Imagine using the Corona virus outbreak to glorify China when they literally failed horribly.

Imagine praising Cuba for making a gay concentration camp.
 

RodgerDodger

True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
Apparently the minister of Singapore held a conference in February about the virus and the transmission.

I'm not sure if it was ever linked, but it was interesting to watch. I don't know if it was linked since this thread goes so fast. If it was, then sorry.

Based on what he said, it seemed like transmission had a better chance of traveling from short distances and airborne had a better chance if infecting with surfaces and touches by hands. This video's been going around recently.

That's mainly how it works. For most Flu and Cold type viruses the aerosol transmission normally needs fairly close contact, say 2 meters or less. It dilutes pretty quickly in open air. And it probably takes a decent virus load to get cooking in you. Outside of that most secondary infection is normally surface contaminants. Things you touch with your hands that then get transferred to your face.

Now as to why people and governments are praying for warmer weather. Viruses are very fragile. And can only tolerate some narrow ranges outside of a host. For most cold and flu type viruses warm weather and sunlight sanitizes them. They work the opposite of bacteria, fungus and some jungle diseases. 80 degrees F, high sunlight days and rising humidity cause them to distort and break up. That's what the experts are hoping will happen here.
 

Dolphin Lundgren

True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
That's mainly how it works. For most Flu and Cold type viruses the aerosol transmission normally needs fairly close contact, say 2 meters or less. It dilutes pretty quickly in open air. And it probably takes a decent virus load to get cooking in you. Outside of that most secondary infection is normally surface contaminants. Things you touch with your hands that then get transferred to your face.

Now as to why people and governments are praying for warmer weather. Viruses are very fragile. And can only tolerate some narrow ranges outside of a host. For most cold and flu type viruses warm weather and sunlight sanitizes them. They work the opposite of bacteria, fungus and some jungle diseases. 80 degrees F, high sunlight days and rising humidity cause them to distort and break up. That's what the experts are hoping will happen here.

It was interesting to watch this video because the germs in air thing has always confused me. Of course I'm not surprised that touching by hands especially outside is an issue. I am wondering what will happen come Spring to late Spring up to Summer. Heat waves are quite common out here.
 

Eryngium

#Biden2020 #BlueNoMatterWho #RidingWithBiden
kiwifarms.net

Bob's Fuckass Head

Don't worry I got a good deal on it!
kiwifarms.net
Sweet sugar-frosted Christ, someone strapped a JATO to this thread while I was off helping the family get prepped over the past week.

We have to remember that technology, and medical science have come a long fucking way since the Spanish Flu, and once indomitable, and inescapable diseases like Small Pox, and Polio have been eradicated, if not outright cured.

I know my brother's words from my last post implied that we were screwed, but what he meant was that as soon as we actually figure out how the Coronavirus works, the sooner a cure can be made. The Coronavirus might be a dangerous foe, but it's nowhere near one we can't beat.

We just need to keep calm, use common sense, not jump to any outrageous conclusions, continue researching, and for fuck's sake, stop filling the thread with bullshit doomer posts about how "WE'RE ALL GUNNA DIE!".

Seriously, the posts were funny at first, and all the info on prepping was really useful, but now they're just super annoying. We're gonna be fine. We're gonna get through this. I know we are. Bat Soup Flu is not going to kill us all, and to think such a thing is exceptional.

I'll second the general confidence in the progress of medicine. I still have full use of both my eyes thanks to modern med - we just have to keep ourselves alive long enough for the Progress™ to happen.

Our new WaiFlu is a real libertine, highly infective with a long incubation time and asymptomatic transmission. For a lot of people, that means it will be very difficult (if not impractical) to avoid ever becoming infected. The next best goal is to avoid infection during the periods of greatest strain on medical resources and general infrastructure, which I think is feasible for those of us who have been planning and absorbing all the useful general info in this thread.

I mentioned way back in one of my previous posts that it's good to plan and prepare, but you have to limit the scope to what you can handle without becoming over-stressed. Ask people you know for help if necessary; getting help will ease the strain on yourself and possibly reinforce some social bonds at a crucial time. It's fairly well-known that excess stress can suppress your immune system, so we should all be looking to avoid that. Hard agree with @Jet Fuel Johnny on smiling at yourself in the mirror, or just making stupid faces. Little things like that help both your mind and your body.

It's good general life practice to have some kind of little stress management routine that you can call up whenever it's needed, ideally one that doesn't require any tools or setup. Humming a song, reciting plant facts, drawing a dick in your mind's eye, something you can do on the spur of the moment to help settle and focus yourself. Do current year burgerland families still practice disaster safety drills? I'm surprised how many tips and bits of info I retained from doing those when I was a wee faglet, and I'd hate for that body of knowledge to be lost.

The timing of the epidemic is particularly dire for Iran’s economy. As part of President Trump’s “maximum-pressure campaign,” the U.S. reimposed economic sanctions on Iran—and any foreign company or country that does business with it—in November, 2018. Iran’s economy contracted more than nine per cent last year. Since the coronavirus outbreak began, ten days ago, eleven countries, including major trading partners such as Afghanistan, Iraq, and Turkey, have closed their borders to the Islamic Republic, according to Adnan Mazarei, an economist at the Peterson Institute for International Economics, in Washington. “The entire Middle East region could soon be affected by Iran’s role as an epicenter of this contagion,” he wrote on Thursday. “The Middle East region will certainly be hit by a new round of downward pressure on oil prices on account of a decline in demand for oil by China and elsewhere,” he added. And China has accounted for a quarter of all Iranian trade.
Internal commerce is also likely to take a hit on the eve of Nowruz, the Persian New Year, in three weeks. Nowruz is the country’s biggest holiday, and the ritual is to buy new clothes and toys—and to travel to the Caspian coast or other vacation spots to take a break from Iran’s mounting crises. The more that Nowruz celebrations are curtailed, the greater the danger for protests about the epidemic, global isolation, and unanticipated economic setbacks. Two waves of protests have challenged the regime since November.

I knew it was a safe assumption that Iran's economy was in the shitter, but I had no idea it was nine per cent in the shitter. Now I feel like a rætard for being sorta confused about the full extent of general unrest over there. Economy in shambles, trade's closed due to plague, and the clerics are telling people "it'll all be fine if you lick that shrine."
 

BONE_Buddy

Guaranteed Same Day Delivery.
kiwifarms.net
Kim Jong Un tells officials that they will be dealt with harshly if Coronavirus is not contained kept out of the country:
Kim warns of 'serious consequences' if virus reaches North Korea

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un warned top party officials of the "serious consequences" of failing to prevent an outbreak of the new coronavirus in the country, state media reported Saturday.

The impoverished nation, with a weak and ill-equipped healthcare system, has closed its borders to prevent the spread of the disease into its territory.

Kim told a meeting of the ruling Workers' Party of Korea that the fight against the virus was a "crucial state affair for the defence of the people" that required maximum discipline, according to the official Korean Central News Agency (KCNA).

"In case the infectious disease spreading beyond control finds its way into our country, it will entail serious consequences," KCNA quoted Kim as saying.

Two senior officials -- party vice-chairmen Ri Man Gon and Pak Thae Dok -- were sacked, and a party unit disbanded for corruption, the report said, indicating that they may have been involved in graft linked with the anti-epidemic measures.

"No special cases must be allowed," he added, and ordered officials to "seal off all the channels and space through which the infectious disease may find its way".

Pyongyang has not reported a single case of COVID-19, which has killed more than 2,800 people and infected over 84,000 people in dozens of countries since it emerged in neighbouring China.

North Korea has banned tourists, suspended international trains and flights and placed hundreds of foreigners in quarantine to prevent an outbreak. It has also reportedly postponed the new school term.

With loudspeakers blaring hygiene messages, ambassadors locked in their compounds, and state media demanding "absolute obedience", North Korea's anti-coronavirus measures have been described as "unprecedented" by diplomats.

South Korea, meanwhile, is battling a major outbreak of the virus with more than 2,300 cases -- the highest number outside mainland China.

Germany's ambassador to the United Nations has said the Security Council would adopt humanitarian exemptions to the sanctions imposed on Pyongyang over its weapons programmes, and allow the export of equipment to help North Korea fight the coronavirus.

But "the problem is that right now the North Koreans closed the borders," Christoph Heusgen said Thursday after a closed-door Security Council meeting about the reclusive state.

The members of the Security Council called on North Korea "to allow this equipment in. So the population can be protected," he added, without elaborating on the type of equipment.

-End of Article-
 

Sissy Galvez

True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
Saw this on le chan:
View attachment 1167676

Wasn't sure on the accuracy so I tracked down this one's twitter:

Sounds like Washington could be far more of a hotbed than previously thought.
I’ve been saying it in this thread for awhile. Planes from China were stopped too late and they allowed others from Thailand, Korea, Singapore, Japan to keep coming. People could easily hop over there and then fly direct to Seattle because there are too many damn Asians there and direct flights from Asia.

It’s really bad on the west coast and the reason why it’s bad is because the testing requirements were too strict and functional test kits were shipped too late and they authorized state labs too late.
 

Sinner's Sandwich

Eid Nedib Eid !
kiwifarms.net
Jesus it's exiting & scary at the same time.

My parents said there were lots of panic buys in Berlin yesterday. They coulnd't even find guinea pig food (!!). They went from shop to shop but it was sold out. Thank god they found some eventually. I'm concerned about all the poor pets who might have to starve to death.

I'm thinking about stocking on food & water too. Just in case.
 

Similar threads

One stop shopping for those who want to spend $100 on a bottle of rubbing alcohol
Replies
89
Views
18K
  • Poll
Probably a good idea to have a thread on this given how often it's discussed and will continue to be discussed even after November.
Replies
940
Views
139K
Top