The Linux Thread - The Autist's OS of Choice

Considered HARMful

kiwifarms.net
And yet you literally can't explain that at all?
Who says I cannot? It is you who claimed that going into Wireguard means diving "into the deep end", which is so ridiculous that I didn't want to comment any further at the risk of offending your intellect.

Like, have you ever seen OpenVPN configs versus Wireguard configs? The latter is in all respects the first cryptographically strong VPN service that I can configure without crazy amounts of time, documentation perusing, example-comparing and then debugging. After doing it about thrice I can almost do it by heart. It's as close to "it just works" as can be imagined.

And it's very, very stable, even on flaky networks. Probably because it doesn't require stupid amounts of traffic to (re)handshake when the connection drops. This might also have something to do with how short (compared to the other VPN techs) the implementation is, me being able to actually read it and hack it in one evening.
 

Aidan

kiwifarms.net
XFCE is great, and works well or better with some distros. KDE is usually the counterweight to this, providing much better and flashier graphics, but at a much higher penalty on the CPU. Not to mention RAM as well.

LXDE is always a good alternative where available.

I always go for the lightest desktop that is compatible with my distro and work up from there.

KDE is nice to have, for fun. But rarely do I need more than what a good working install of XFCE or even LXDE can provide, if it's available.

XFCE and LXDE also have the advantage of being the most Windows like menu systems as well if they work on your desktop. That is why I always start friends and family off with that if they can - it's something they are familiar with.

There is little point in confusing them with a more Mac type interface such as Manjaro (might be wrong about that - only working from memory) when other more simple interfaces like XFCE and LXDE will suffice.
I use Manjaro XFCE and it's more similar to Windows than Mac if you ask me but I haven't used either in years so it's possible I've just adjusted to being flexible with desktops by now and incorrectly remember nuances of both.
I'd highly recommend trying it out for anyone wanting to have an Arch-based system that's also really easy to jump into.

I've had one consistent problem that occasionally pisses me off but not enough to look into fixing it. That being that if I eat up all the RAM, even with a SWAP file, everything will stall until some stuff is killed off. It's rarely an issue but it's something I could see ruining someone's day.
Looking around online I know this isn't a "me" thing but solutions range all over the place.
 

Considered HARMful

kiwifarms.net
I've had one consistent problem that occasionally pisses me off but not enough to look into fixing it. That being that if I eat up all the RAM, even with a SWAP file, everything will stall until some stuff is killed off. It's rarely an issue but it's something I could see ruining someone's day.
Check which process hogs the memory with either top or (the more pleasant to use) htop. Remember to sort by memory use instead of the default CPU use.
 

Aidan

kiwifarms.net
Check which process hogs the memory with either top or (the more pleasant to use) htop. Remember to sort by memory use instead of the default CPU use.
That isn't the issue. The issue is that it happens in the first place. I've also noticed it happens on the KDE version on a laptop I've had with KDE Plasma as the desktop environment but again haven't looked into why that's such a problen on Manjaro for me.
It tends to happen when I either deal with large files (laptop particularly) or am busy doing something particular that had me go down a rabbit hole of infinite tabs and then I open up something else that requires a few gigs of RAM and things bog down before locking up. Then if I have time I will just wait until it sorts itself out, otherwise I have to hard boot.

Can't even get into another tty.

All the gripes aside I cba to switch to another distro at the moment since it's a very rare issue.
 

Considered HARMful

kiwifarms.net
That isn't the issue. The issue is that it happens in the first place. I've also noticed it happens on the KDE version on a laptop I've had with KDE Plasma as the desktop environment but again haven't looked into why that's such a problen on Manjaro for me.
It tends to happen when I either deal with large files (laptop particularly) or am busy doing something particular that had me go down a rabbit hole of infinite tabs and then I open up something else that requires a few gigs of RAM and things bog down before locking up. Then if I have time I will just wait until it sorts itself out, otherwise I have to hard boot.
Ah yes, Linux does a bad job of prioritizing resident memory for "interactive" (user-facing) processes, because throughput > user experience and fuck you very much if you don't have 32 GiB of RAM and/or SSD and dare to use 10 tabs in a Modern Internet Browser™.

Being on a laptop I assume you have a relatively slow HDD and 8 GiB RAM (correct me if I'm wrong). Heavy I/O such as the workloads you mentioned (large file processing or swap thrashing) will hamper responsiveness of the rest of the processes.

This might be rectified to some extent by mucking around with different IO schedulers, but it's a bit of a rabbit hole at this point. Compressed RAM is also nice if you're strapped for memory, have used it in the past and can attest.
Can't even get into another tty.
I know that feel bro. Eventually the tty will switch, but you might need to wait some minutes either for the swap fandango to thrash on the memory or for OOM killer to do its job.
 

Aidan

kiwifarms.net
Ah yes, Linux does a bad job of prioritizing resident memory for "interactive" (user-facing) processes, because throughput > user experience and fuck you very much if you don't have 32 GiB of RAM and/or SSD and dare to use 10 tabs in a Modern Internet Browser™.

Being on a laptop I assume you have a relatively slow HDD and 8 GiB RAM (correct me if I'm wrong). Heavy I/O such as the workloads you mentioned (large file processing or swap thrashing) will hamper responsiveness of the rest of the processes.

This might be rectified to some extent by mucking around with different IO schedulers, but it's a bit of a rabbit hole at this point. Compressed RAM is also nice if you're strapped for memory, have used it in the past and can attest.

I know that feel bro. Eventually the tty will switch, but you might need to wait some minutes either for the swap fandango to thrash on the memory or for OOM killer to do its job.
It's desktop and laptop, both with SSDs and in both cases the OS is on an SSD.
Laptop is 8GB RAM, Desktop is 16GB.

Swap files are also on the SSDs.

It's a pretty inexcusable error to have that would prevent a normal person from having a good time if they're the type to have 500 tabs open or something else memory hungry. Haven't looked into it beyond trying a SWAP file so not sure why it's like this. Never had the issue on any other distro.
 

Cool Dog

A goodboi denied his Wendy's
kiwifarms.net
Got tired of ricing and just went with PopOS! which is ubuntu without the aids

Still it took a while to get it running properly, and cant enable hibernation for some reason

Might try moving the DE to KDE since gnome is kinda shit these days, what do you guys think?
 

malt ipecac

kiwifarms.net
I've had one consistent problem that occasionally pisses me off but not enough to look into fixing it. That being that if I eat up all the RAM, even with a SWAP file, everything will stall until some stuff is killed off. It's rarely an issue but it's something I could see ruining someone's day.
It's a pretty inexcusable error to have that would prevent a normal person from having a good time if they're the type to have 500 tabs open or something else memory hungry. Haven't looked into it beyond trying a SWAP file so not sure why it's like this. Never had the issue on any other distro.

If you don't mind my asking, what are you doing to have "a good time" that involves 500 tabs open simultaneously?

Sounds like you're experiencing the effects of something called "OOM Killer." This won't help you fix the problem, but you may, at least, be amused.

https://lwn.net/Articles/104185/ said:
An aircraft company discovered that it was cheaper to fly its planes with less fuel on board. The planes would be lighter and use less fuel and money was saved. On rare occasions however the amount of fuel was insufficient, and the plane would crash. This problem was solved by the engineers of the company by the development of a special OOF (out-of-fuel) mechanism. In emergency cases a passenger was selected and thrown out of the plane. (When necessary, the procedure was repeated.) A large body of theory was developed and many publications were devoted to the problem of properly selecting the victim to be ejected. Should the victim be chosen at random? Or should one choose the heaviest person? Or the oldest? Should passengers pay in order not to be ejected, so that the victim would be the poorest on board? And if for example the heaviest person was chosen, should there be a special exception in case that was the pilot? Should first class passengers be exempted? Now that the OOF mechanism existed, it would be activated every now and then, and eject passengers even when there was no fuel shortage. The engineers are still studying precisely how this malfunction is caused.
 

eternal dog mongler

kiwifarms.net
Hasn't KDE become a lot lighter to the point it's now somewhat viable for lightweight distros?

GNOME is the eternal resource hog. GNOME is cancer in general.
Yeah, but KDE does weird things if you try to run it on a potato.

I have an extremely old computer around here that runs openSUSE with KDE. It's usable, but animations are instant and it takes a bit to populate menus and such. Kind of a weird experience.
 

Wood

kiwifarms.net
How does Debian compare to other Linux?
IMO Debian is a hassle on desktop. Stable branch has a long release cycle so you will be pushed towards using the testing branch, which is not intended for end users. Default install is kind of bare so you need to know what components to install.
 

Jimjamflimflam

kiwifarms.net
I actually intend to try to get a career out of it eventually, Linux, networking and digital security, are all things I'm trying to delve into. With the hopes of having a fulfilling career after a couple years. (Optimistic?)

Sup there. Sort of in the same situation. Used the computer as a glorified internet box and doing simple things like install firmware that wows people who are below me in skill level.

Work had plans for a pentesting team until our network engineer left and our other guy was promoted to IT head, which then they approached me if i want to do it. With no knowledge I've been trying to self learn what I need.

First step from what i can gather is learn Networking. Figure if i can pass the Comptia Networking+ it should put me on the right track while trying to incorporate more Linux into my knowledge (also don't want to use MS anymore). Gonna try the test at the end of the month. Hit me up if you need a security learning buddy.


@Jimjamflimflam No clue. You mention you updated things, did it also update the kernel? If so try to revert to the previous kernel or just try another LTS kernel, idk.
Have you tried to check if the file system got messed up at all using fsck?
If you need to do a full reinstall then it should be pretty easy if you did default partitioning since almost everything is probably in your home directory, so I'd back that up and then either reinstall and plop everything back in via cp/rsync and you'd be pretty much back where you were...

I'd recommend on future installs you set up a dedicated /home partition to make it easier to deal with OS-specific issues or just whenever you get around to trying another distro

Thanks for the help. As i said still learning so unsure if the kernel was updated. I think so? Will verify the logs. Fsck I believe came back fine.

I think im just gonna short cut it and reinstall. Use it as a good experience to learn how to setup a automated weekly backup to restore from if it happens in the future.
 
Top