Mega Rad Gun Thread -

Particle Bored

I am made out of toothpicks and glue.
True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
Looks like by removing gun shops from San Francisco, the folks over there have no idea how super hard it is to buy a pistol legally and how long it takes and the costs on top of MSRP.


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Lol what a dumb bitch.
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(Also real guns dont come in fucking blister packages)
 
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principle scoop

kiwifarms.net
I'm looking to pick up a Beretta 92. On one hand, the autist in me prefers the simple profile of the 92FS. On the other hand, a 92a1 or 92X would offer a handy tac-rail.

So, any advice? Be a sucker for the classics, or take a modernized version?
Have you looked into the Taurus PT92 series? It is a 92 made on Beretta tooling but it uses a different magazine and it has a frame mounted safety and decocker. You can carry it cocked and lock if you like. I have not heard a bad thing about them. Mec Gar makes restricted 10 round mags, 18 round flush mags, and 20 round extended mags for the PT92.
 

Club Sandwich

kiwifarms.net
I was looking at the 92S few days ago, the blueing on those old Berettas is gorgeous. New ones look good but the finish isn't as deep, looks more matte. Also yeah, the rail does kind of ruin the lines.

Wish I could find a 92FS for cheap instead of a 92S, that mag release button placement doesn't do it for me.

Here's a handy list of the differences between the models.
Bruniton includes ceramic particles to provide hardness, durability, and anti-corrosive properties. it is what makes it "matte" in appearance. it can be polished off with Mother's 05101 aluminum polish and then easily given a hot salt blue. the 92FS should be available in most places for around $400-$500 in very good condition as they have been made for decades and many "broken" ones can be made like-new by replacing the barrel and locking piece, as very little else in the pistol is likely to need service other than consumables (extractor spring, recoil spring, tritium or whatever in some sights, et c).

also it's worth pointing out a few mistakes and maybe an omission in the info graphic:
1. the 96 variations also existed in particular variations like the Brigadier 96G Elite.
2. the 92 inherits much of it's mechanics from the model 951 (1951), in a similar way that the P226 inherits from the P220.
3. the earlier "straight dust cover" of the 92F was changed in the early 90's to the sloped dust cover alongside the enlarged hammer pin's head (which was a safety feature insisted upon by the US Navy) in order to have a single frame that could be used for both 9x19mm and .40 S&W ammunition. consequently if you have one of the later frames, you can swap calibers by buying a recoil spring assembly, barrel, locking block, and extractor.
4. the 92 uses a modified falling block mechanism, which means that it is sensitive to barrel mass when adding a muzzle device like a suppressor. it is why suppressed 92's are uncommon as it's cheaper/easier to just use a different base pistol. to use a suppressor, the 92 needs a Nielsen Device to increase recoil.
5. the front sight is not removable or adjustable unless that particular model has that feature. be careful of this when shopping.
6. the Billenium was a limited production run, unlike the other models listed. only 2000 units were made, with 1900 of them available to the public (the others were gifts).
7. there are several variations of the Inox with slightly different finishes on small parts and even materials for the frame and slide.
8. The 92FS produced after 1993 have reversible magazine catches, allowing it to be swapped left to right or vice versa. Beretta's that have presentation grips may not be compatible with aftermarket or factory magazine catches as the presentation grips are explicitly matched to that pistol if ordered from the factory (serial number on left hand grip panel interior).
9. Wilson Combat is the only Beretta-authorized customization shop in the US that isn't the Beretta Performance Center. they are licensed to also do conversions and repairs.

word of warning: when servicing a Beretta 92 (or really any firearm of unknown condition that uses a falling block or rolling lock action) the locking block must be matched with the barrel and changing one requires changing the other for reliable and safe operation. the most common part to break is the locking shoulder on the locking block and it will usually crack around the 10,000 round mark, but can loosen a bit earlier than that. use a strong light to check for cracks, peening or mushrooming or gouges on the shoulder surface and underside of the barrel.

Taurus PT92 series? It is a 92 made on Beretta tooling but it uses a different magazine and it has a frame mounted safety and decocker
the PT92 is based on a modified 92 (later 92SB) produced under contract for the Brazilian state military in the 1970's. early Beretta magazines (and licensed copies) are compatible, but as the frame changed over the years, the magazine catch location also moved slightly. you can simply cut/file a new notch on cheap surplus magazines, or get the correct ones to begin with.
 
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MrJokerRager

Moar Big Boobs and Trump 2024
kiwifarms.net
I am looking into upgrading my Ruger 10/22 Takedown.

Looking into replacing the trigger that that lightweight BX trigger, relate the magazine pull with an extended release and debating to replace the bolt handle as it feels loose.

And replacing the full stock with the Magpul 10/22 takedown stock versions.
 

Blasterisk

dream is fat
True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
I am looking into upgrading my Ruger 10/22 Takedown.

Looking into replacing the trigger that that lightweight BX trigger, relate the magazine pull with an extended release and debating to replace the bolt handle as it feels loose.

And replacing the full stock with the Magpul 10/22 takedown stock versions.
What you should buy is the match trigger and an Ender 3.
 

Meat Target

Tactical headpats
kiwifarms.net
Is it possible to fly with only a lower on aircraft or do I have to declare that?

At least the Ruger AR-556 lower comes in a box lol.
A receiver's a receiver, don't get jammed up on account of a chunk of aluminum.
Kiwi Farms isn't the place to ask for legal advice. See if the TSA, FAA, or others have information on it, or talk to a lawyer.

It's bullshit that you should have to ask for such permission in an ostensibly free country. But when you get into legal gray areas like this, it's best to err on the side of caution.

I know you're excited to be a new gun owner, but I'd also like you to not go to jail.
 

Badungus Kabungus

True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
Kiwi Farms isn't the place to ask for legal advice. See if the TSA, FAA, or others have information on it, or talk to a lawyer.

It's bullshit that you should have to ask for such permission in an ostensibly free country. But when you get into legal gray areas like this, it's best to err on the side of caution.

I know you're excited to be a new gun owner, but I'd also like you to not go to jail.
Agreed, best to consult with a lawyer or such. May be safer to mail it to yourself or something like that. You don't want to be at the mercy of an organization like the TSA, where the average person has the IQ of a doorknob but likes to exercise their authority.

Fun fact: In Canada it's allowed to fly with a folding knife on your person as long as the blade is less about ~2.3 inches.
 

Club Sandwich

kiwifarms.net
i travel extremely frequently with firearms. generally, it should be unloaded, without ammunition of any sort or if required, in a separate container. the firearm should be in a secured container (preferably a "hard" hardigg or pelican container) and no, you do not need TSA approved locks - any quality lock (i prefer abloy disc detainer locks) is fine as long as you have control over it and can unlock it for inspection by TSA or customs. if you are traveling between countries, consult the originating and destination country's customs agency for information. you may need additional paperwork or permits for travel.

you will want to declare it as checked luggage as well typically, but that can vary slightly depending on who you are and the exact item in question.

some airports/airlines, countries, and jurisdictions (NY for example) will have specific rules that you need to follow to avoid getting into legal trouble. consult a lawyer in the district you are traveling to, as well as the TSA guidelines here: https://www.tsa.gov/travel/transporting-firearms-and-ammunition
 
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