The Linux Thread - The Autist's OS of Choice

He Who Points And Laughs

Flavortown Refugee
kiwifarms.net
I have ubuntu as my main partition and windows 7 for playing games but I went years without using my ubuntu partition and it's been a real bitch trying to figure out how to use this shit again.
I'm like that, but reversed. All the simple tasks in Linux feel alien for me when I use windows with the gui. Using a remote shell and using the cli feels less alien.
 

garakfan69

Mentally Enabled Schizoposter
kiwifarms.net
Sure, Alpine is one example. Gentoo has support for musl as well, and Void has a split-distro thing going on where you can either run a glibc or musl version of the distro. I currently run glibc Void, but I'm interested in seeing if anyone had some experience with musl in general on a daily driver machine.
I've tried Void's musl version for a while. But I did end up having a glibc chroot on it as well since some software like my browser doesn't correctly work with musl.
 

Stock Image Photographer

All my homies hate human rights
kiwifarms.net
I've tried Void's musl version for a while. But I did end up having a glibc chroot on it as well since some software like my browser doesn't correctly work with musl.
That's a shame. Did you notice any performance increases or reduced space needed while using musl, or is the only benefit just knowing that your programs don't have any glibc fuckery going on in them?
 

hauser

kiwifarms.net
been using windows 10 for a really long time. decided to stop with it due to the immense bloat slowing down my computer. transitioned to manjaro with KDE plasma 5. not regretting a single thing. almost every single game in my library works exceedingly well. the only thing I need to think about now is how I will replace the adobe programs.

I am using scribus as replacement for adobe indesign, and inkscape as replacement for adobe illustrator, but I am not sure what to use to replace video and audio adobe software. is it possible to just install adobe software using WINE, or is it not quite as easy as that? if not, what are good alternatives for them?
 
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Shoggoth

kiwifarms.net
been using windows 10 for a really long time. decided to stop with it due to the immense bloat slowing down my computer. transitioned to manjaro with KDE plasma 5. not regretting a single thing. almost every single game in my library works exceedingly well. the only thing I need to think about now is how I will replace the adobe programs.

I am using scribus as replacement for adobe indesign, and inkscape as replacement for adobe illustrator, but I am not sure what to use to replace video and audio adobe software. is it possible to just install adobe software using WINE, or is it not quite as easy as that? if not, what are good alternatives for them?
Try KDEnlive for video editing
 

He Who Points And Laughs

Flavortown Refugee
kiwifarms.net
been using windows 10 for a really long time. decided to stop with it due to the immense bloat slowing down my computer. transitioned to manjaro with KDE plasma 5. not regretting a single thing. almost every single game in my library works exceedingly well. the only thing I need to think about now is how I will replace the adobe programs.

I am using scribus as replacement for adobe indesign, and inkscape as replacement for adobe illustrator, but I am not sure what to use to replace video and audio adobe software. is it possible to just install adobe software using WINE, or is it not quite as easy as that? if not, what are good alternatives for them?
KDenLive for video, and also give Krita a try for an Illustrator replacement. It's a KDE application so it will work well in your Plasma environment.
 

hauser

kiwifarms.net
KDenLive for video, and also give Krita a try for an Illustrator replacement. It's a KDE application so it will work well in your Plasma environment.
krita does seem like a very good photoshop/SAI/etc. alternative for linux, but unfortunately it is for digitally painting bitmap graphics. inkscape and illustrator are for vector graphics, which is what I am looking for. not much of a digital painter guy.

From what I heard the learning curve for it is a bit steep but it's extremely powerful.
Godspeed
well, it does look like any other industry standard video editor (i.e. adobe premiere / sony vegas), both of which I am used to, so I am sure I will be fine.
 

He Who Points And Laughs

Flavortown Refugee
kiwifarms.net
krita does seem like a very good photoshop/SAI/etc. alternative for linux, but unfortunately it is for digitally painting bitmap graphics. inkscape and illustrator are for vector graphics, which is what I am looking for. not much of a digital painter guy.
Ah. My only experience with Illustrator was from my wife. Her company in Tokyo all used Macs and Illustrator (fashion and handbag design).
 
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OwO What's This?

True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
starting to think I need to start running Arch on my dual-boot laptop. I've noticed whenever I google linux stuff, Arch stuff is getting more and more prominently featured, they have a pretty well coordinated wiki and a lot of documentation and are pretty good at keeping manuals up to date. (yes I know about the man command but you'll never get me to like browsing documentation in the terminal, supposedly there's a way to autoconvert all manuals with pandoc as they're updated but I just really don't want to bother)

I haven't really heard anyone talk about its default DE which is 'Pantheon', is it any good? I notice it uses GTK3 which a lot of people complain about, but it doesn't seem like there's any DE that uses Qt5 yet except for LXQT which is stuck in development hell.

I just want something that won't randomly decide to fuck up like Ubuntu LTS releases seem to, it has given me insight as to why Debian-based distros they haven't completely overtaken Redhat yet.

honestly my biggest concern with going with arch is having to use pacman, I was exposed to it through using msys2 and I fucking despise it with every fiber of my being
 
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Vecr

"nanoposts with 90° spatial rotational symmetries"
kiwifarms.net
starting to think I need to start running Arch on my dual-boot laptop. I've noticed whenever I google linux stuff, Arch stuff is getting more and more prominently featured, they have a pretty well coordinated wiki and a lot of documentation and are pretty good at keeping manuals up to date. (yes I know about the man command but you'll never get me to like browsing documentation in the terminal, supposedly there's a way to autoconvert all manuals with pandoc as they're updated but I just really don't want to bother)

I haven't really heard anyone talk about it's default DE which is apparently 'Pantheon', is it any good? I notice it uses GTK3 which a lot of people complain about, but it doesn't seem like there's any DE that uses Qt5 yet except for LXQT which is stuck in development hell.

I just want something that won't randomly decide to fuck up like Ubuntu LTS releases seem to, it has given me insight as to why Debian-based distros they haven't completely overtaken Redhat yet.

honestly my biggest concern with going with arch is having to use pacman, I was exposed to it through using msys2 and I fucking despise it with every fiber of my being
Arch does not have a default DE, if you want one, you have to install it yourself.
 

He Who Points And Laughs

Flavortown Refugee
kiwifarms.net
When you install Arch, you are left in a similar state to a Gentoo install. You boot into a fully functional Linux environment without X or your favorite, non-standard, tools. So once you log in after install, you need to pick a WM and the applications you like.

My Arch laptop is suckless (DWM, st, surf).

Their wiki is outstanding. So when you decide to start building your base install, utilize the wiki.

Here's a tip, when you install arch, during the partitioning section, use cfdisk instead of gparted or fdisk. It's an ncurses version of fdisk which is way easier to use. If you have a UEFI system, just make boot a fat32 partition. Make a swap partition... then the rest is up to you. I'm partial to ext4 because of stability issues. I've lost data on jfs, reiser, and xfs before.

If you're using old school BIOS instead of UEFI, use ext2 for /boot.

For total safety, make /boot at least 250MB and /swap at least 1gb. You might not ever hit swap, but it's good have.
 
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hauser

kiwifarms.net
starting to think I need to start running Arch on my dual-boot laptop. I've noticed whenever I google linux stuff, Arch stuff is getting more and more prominently featured, they have a pretty well coordinated wiki and a lot of documentation and are pretty good at keeping manuals up to date. (yes I know about the man command but you'll never get me to like browsing documentation in the terminal, supposedly there's a way to autoconvert all manuals with pandoc as they're updated but I just really don't want to bother)

I haven't really heard anyone talk about its default DE which is 'Pantheon', is it any good? I notice it uses GTK3 which a lot of people complain about, but it doesn't seem like there's any DE that uses Qt5 yet except for LXQT which is stuck in development hell.

I just want something that won't randomly decide to fuck up like Ubuntu LTS releases seem to, it has given me insight as to why Debian-based distros they haven't completely overtaken Redhat yet.

honestly my biggest concern with going with arch is having to use pacman, I was exposed to it through using msys2 and I fucking despise it with every fiber of my being
if you wanna use arch linux without any of the hassle of building it from scratch for your own needs, you can always go for manjaro linux which is based on arch. it does have its own repositories that are downstream from arch, but nothing stops you from accessing the arch repository directly (by using yay package manager). personally I am not scared of building arch for myself from scratch, but I am a casual user, and maximizing computer resources for my exact needs is not a very high priority, especially since I do almost everything you can do with a computer: editing videos, playing games, compiling programs, and so on. manjaro (with KDE) has served me exceedingly well and I would recommend it to all casual users any day.
 
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GethN7

Set free by truth, my only true judge is God
True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
if you wanna use arch linux without any of the hassle of building it from scratch for your own needs, you can always go for manjaro linux which is based on arch. it does have its own repositories that are downstream from arch, but nothing stops you from accessing the arch repository directly (by using yay package manager). personally I am not scared of building arch for myself from scratch, but I am a casual user, and maximizing computer resources for my exact needs is not a very high priority, especially since I do almost everything you can do with a computer: editing videos, playing games, compiling programs, and so on. manjaro (with KDE) has served me exceedingly well and I would recommend it to all casual users any day.
I'll second this. Manjaro is the Linux Mint of Arch.

It's got Arch's inherent advantages, but it's far more easy to use. I do, however, recommend you try pure Arch if you don't want enforced hand-holding and are confident in your Linux skills, because Manjaro is not easy to experiment with if customizing it in a very specific way is your intention.
 
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AmpleApricots

kiwifarms.net
A good idea is to configure zram partitions as swap, if your computer doesn't belong in a museum some light compression 100% in RAM is usually still a lot faster than trashing even an SSD. Because of scheduling junk one partition per CPU core is a good idea, size I usually use equal to as much RAM as the machine has, evenly divded up between the zram partitions. Even with heavy swap usage I never ran into issues. If you have lots of RAM you can also skip having swap but it's always preferable to Linux broken OOM Killer if things go wrong. You can also put /tmp/ in a RAM disk. /var/tmp *theoretically* also since nothing states that data there needs to survive reboots. If you have a source based distro like gentoo, putting the workspace where the sources get unpacked and compiled into a ram disk is a considerable speed boost.
 

He Who Points And Laughs

Flavortown Refugee
kiwifarms.net
If you have lots of RAM you can also skip having swap but it's always preferable to Linux broken OOM Killer if things go wrong.
Building chromium from source with 32gb of ram on an 8 core cpu with the -jumbo-build USE flag enabled, my system hit under 1 gb of free ram. I did have an additional 1gb of /swap available, but it just shows not only how incredibly bloated modern browsers are, but also how precarious system resources can become.
 
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