The Linux Thread - The Autist's OS of Choice

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Hellstate man trapped in parents' house
True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
afaik if I keep a dual boot I keep window's bootloader because it won't play nice otherwise. If I'm nuking windows from orbit, I want to make sure it's clean.
Either is compatible with my partitioning strategy afaict. The only issue there might be is with Windows not being able to access Linux partitions, but I don't even know if you can access plain Ext4 partitions nowadays.
Edit: quick googling shows I may be wrong. What's up with bootloaders and dual boots?
I think what you do nowadays is install Grub at the top of the hierarchy and make it chainload the Windows bootloader. I don't know if the Windows bootloader is able to boot Linux at all. (WUBI used to be a thing iirc)
 
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Croco

Heh, heh...
kiwifarms.net
afaik if I keep a dual boot I keep window's bootloader because it won't play nice otherwise. If I'm nuking windows from orbit, I want to make sure it's clean.
Edit: quick googling shows I may be wrong. What's up with bootloaders and dual boots?
I had a dual boot win 10 and ubuntu on seperate M1 SSD. Low and behold decided to update Ubuntu, Microsoft pitched a fit and updated as it so frequently does. After rebooting, neither OS would load past grub. So very angry like, backed up all my data from the tty and said goodbye to dual booting. Linux gaming is great, but don't use noveau (sp) drivers. Steam has plenty of linux friendly downloads to keep you occupied.
 

TwinkLover6969

Boys are for pleasure women are for babies
kiwifarms.net
afaik if I keep a dual boot I keep window's bootloader because it won't play nice otherwise. If I'm nuking windows from orbit, I want to make sure it's clean.
Edit: quick googling shows I may be wrong. What's up with bootloaders and dual boots?
Install Windows first and then install Linux


It Arch but it applies to basically all linux flavors.

Would this be a dual boot?

Personally I like to approach partition tables by minimizing my interactions with them. What I would do with multiple disks (or even a single one) is use LVM. That way you can change the layout of the SSDs and HDDs later if you find out that it's not what you want. You still need to have a partition table on at least one of your disks, (and an ESP if you're booting from UEFI) but after you've done the install process, you don't need to hear about partition tables ever again. That's why I think it's neat.
Yes, do this. LVM master race.
 

GHTD

THE HEART
True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
What are some good optimization kernel patches I could apply the next time I do my routine kernel build? I've got BMQ, Greysky and ACS Override patches already applied to my current kernel.
 

Shoggoth

kiwifarms.net
Some Ubuntu 20.04 spergery:
Chromium is now provided by Snap.
Snap is presumably crap for the following reasons:
  • proprietary servers
  • mount(ains) of madness
  • auto-updates
  • slower start-ups
post update of work machine, chromium was indeed worse. Purged snap and migrated to Brave. I can report migration was seamless.
 

Shayden

The excellence of tiddyness
kiwifarms.net
Some Ubuntu 20.04 spergery:
Chromium is now provided by Snap.
Snap is presumably crap for the following reasons:
  • proprietary servers
  • mount(ains) of madness
  • auto-updates
  • slower start-ups
post update of work machine, chromium was indeed worse. Purged snap and migrated to Brave. I can report migration was seamless.
Doesn't the slower start up times only applies when you first launch the program?
 

3119967d0c

a... brain - @StarkRavingMad
True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
Some Ubuntu 20.04 spergery:
Chromium is now provided by Snap.
Snap is presumably crap for the following reasons:
  • proprietary servers
  • mount(ains) of madness
  • auto-updates
  • slower start-ups
post update of work machine, chromium was indeed worse. Purged snap and migrated to Brave. I can report migration was seamless.
Unbelievably disgusting.

The only good reason they put forward in their excuse for this is that "the upstream project often uses new compiler features that are not available on older releases". OK, I can understand that. Google is delibrately sabotaging stable versions. If that's a concern, just put out a replacement package for those releases that does nothing but display a message saying that Google has delibrately broken the browser on older versions of the distribution and give the addresses and phone numbers for the responsible parties.
 

a_lurker

kiwifarms.net
snap/flatpack and all this gayass sandboxed electron wrapped bullshit needs to die in a fire.

Appimage somewhat makes sense and doesn't require layers of bloat/sandboxing/paravirtualization.

If you wanna be nice, build a fucking package, if not, source will do. Maybe an appimage if you wanna include the kids from the short bus who can't figure out how to play the configure make and cry game.
 

אΩ+1

The Aleph
kiwifarms.net
Some Ubuntu 20.04 spergery:
Chromium is now provided by Snap.
Snap is presumably crap for the following reasons:
  • proprietary servers
  • mount(ains) of madness
  • auto-updates
  • slower start-ups
post update of work machine, chromium was indeed worse. Purged snap and migrated to Brave. I can report migration was seamless.
>That feel when Lanart Peotering made a better app sandboxing system than canonical.
 
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welcometotherock

Chanticleer Hegemony
kiwifarms.net
Used to toy around with Linux back in high school because I had a shit hand-me-down computer and the reset disc was long lost to the sands of time so it was either having to run a horribly bloated Windows Vista system bogged down with adware from 2006 OR have a fresh install of Ubuntu 10.04 and actually be able to do school stuff properly. Once I got a better computer that came with Windows 7 and had decent specs, I ended up just abandoning the platform altogether.

I've been keeping somewhat of an eye on developments in Linux, but a cursory glance shows no real progress that would make me want to make the switch from Windows 10 back to the Linux camp. Some people are still chimping about systemd as if it were the devil itself, the FSF is still terminally exceptional, GNOME's now chimping about transphobia and racism instead of fixing their shit GUI that's somehow managed to exist for the last decade, and it looks like even the once-beloved distros like Mint and Ubuntu have been getting lazy with their LTS releases if the bugs I've read about in the reviews are anything to go off of.

Despite all of that, I still wanna try something on actual hardware instead of virtualbox. ASUS decided to stop shipping BIOS updates for my particular motherboard, so I figured it would probably be a good time to update my rig in the coming months when I can actually scrounge up the money for new parts. I might dump my old stuff into a new case and then install Linux so I can have a little testing box that I can mess around with. Of course, that would only be possible if Ryzen support in Linux has actually matured enough for that to be viable.

Anyone know if Linux (and by extension BSD) support for Ryzen has matured to the point where I won't have to run a rolling release distro?
 
Last edited:

Boss Nigger

Part Legend, Part Devil, All Man
kiwifarms.net
Anyone know if Linux (and by extension BSD) support for Ryzen has matured to the point where I won't have to run a rolling release distro?
I know pop OS (basically ubuntu fork) and clear linux runs very well on ryzen. if youre a tech fag you can look up this guy he made this video 8 months ago:
so it should be much better now, and looked pretty good back then.

edit #1:
he did a gaming stream on ryzen and popos a week ago

edit #2:
thanks for the gold kind stranger
 
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Shayden

The excellence of tiddyness
kiwifarms.net
Used to toy around with Linux back in high school because I had a shit hand-me-down computer and the reset disc was long lost to the sands of time so it was either having to run a horribly bloated Windows Vista system bogged down with adware from 2006 OR have a fresh install of Ubuntu 10.04 and actually be able to do school stuff properly. Once I got a better computer that came with Windows 7 and had decent specs, I ended up just abandoning the platform altogether.

I've been keeping somewhat of an eye on developments in Linux, but a cursory glance shows no real progress that would make me want to make the switch from Windows 10 back to the Linux camp. Some people are still chimping about systemd as if it were the devil itself, the FSF is still terminally exceptional, GNOME's now chimping about transphobia and racism instead of fixing their shit GUI that's somehow managed to exist for the last decade, and it looks like even the once-beloved distros like Mint and Ubuntu have been getting lazy with their LTS releases if the bugs I've read about in the reviews are anything to go off of.

Despite all of that, I still wanna try something on actual hardware instead of virtualbox. ASUS decided to stop shipping BIOS updates for my particular motherboard, so I figured it would probably be a good time to update my rig in the coming months when I can actually scrounge up the money for new parts. I might dump my old stuff into a new case and then install Linux so I can have a little testing box that I can mess around with. Of course, that would only be possible if Ryzen support in Linux has actually matured enough for that to be viable.

Anyone know if Linux (and by extension BSD) support for Ryzen has matured to the point where I won't have to run a rolling release distro?
You should have stated the Ryzen processor you have. Anyways most non-rolling distributions such as Ubuntu 20.04 LTS, Mint 20, OpenSUSE Leap and Fedora 32 should be able to handle all the three generations of Ryzen processors and/or its APU. The only one that might give you trouble (mostly for third generation Ryzen processors) would be Debian, CentOS and Slackware unless you enable HWE or update the kernel manually to one that is 5.x based.

Linux has always been more up to date than the BSDs. If I recall the BSDs get total system updates biannually. So by now, it should be able to fully support it.
 

tehpope

Archivist
True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
Had to reinstall manjaro. Switched to XFCE again. I might have used XFCE on this ssd before as it still has all my old settings. Had to reinstall a few things but all good.

I think I fucked up something about my graphic drivers. Installed ffmpeg-full and then lightdm and x wouldn't start. Such is life. But atleast I have my home folder on another partition so I didn't lose any data.
 
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