The Linux Thread - The Autist's OS of Choice

  • Sorry about the recent downtime. The database server is being autistic. The beatings will continue.

Sam Losco

True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
I already got Manjaro downloaded, if you know, redpill me on the differences between Mint and Manjaro.
Manjaro is a rolling release distro that will have a lot of updates often and may/likely break shit. I've also seen these distros referred to as bleeding edge. I wouldn't recommend it unless you feel like troubleshooting shit a lot.
Mint is a point release distro. Set version numbers and less likely to push out updates that break shit.
 
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Basil II

le putin machine
kiwifarms.net
Manjaro is a rolling release distro that will have a lot of updates often and may/likely break shit. I've also seen these distros referred to as bleeding edge. I wouldn't recommend it unless you feel like troubleshooting shit a lot.
Mint is a point release distro. Set version numbers and less likely to push out updates that break shit.
I don't mind troubleshooting too much, but when you say break shit, is it minor or "your drive is getting fucking formatted".
 

Basil II

le putin machine
kiwifarms.net
Probably more like "oh why doesn't my audio work anymore? Oh, pulseaudio updated. I guess fucking Poettering pushed out some more bullshit code and will blame his bugs on the kernel."
Yeah that's fine, I tend to adapt somewhat quickly to shit like that.
 
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Basil II

le putin machine
kiwifarms.net
Probably more like "oh why doesn't my audio work anymore? Oh, pulseaudio updated. I guess fucking Poettering pushed out some more bullshit code and will blame his bugs on the kernel."
Yeah I guess i'll just do Mint, I don't want an update fucking with my settings or customization. After all, I did list my original reason for wanting to switch was a reaction to microsoft's forced updates.
 

NumberingYourState

REAL MEN Fuck Up
True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
I don't get much help with the official forums but do any of the Kiwifarms approved web browsers work well with Linux TinyCore? How would it handle the installation?

Was thinking of giving it a shot, replacing the OS on the burner-tier hardware laptop I use.
 

Ask Jeeves

True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
Someone may find this useful.
How to enable Kiwifarms 2FA using linux command line instead of phone app (easy)
Install the oath toolkit
Bash:
sudo pacman -S oath-toolkit #arch users
sudo apt-get install oathtool #ubuntu users
Then go to enable 2FA in your kiwifarms account, it should give you a long code (under the QR code) as the secret passphrase. Make sure your clock is accurate as the algorithm uses your time (ubuntu should be fine by default, arch may need to set up online clock sync)
Now whenever you want to generate a one time password use the following. This will send the OTP eg 123456 to the terminal scren.
Code:
oathtool --totp -b ABC123ABC123ABCD
You can set it up to a script that copies the OTP straight to the clipboard for convenience, when the script is run it pipes the output into xclip
Bash:
#/bin/sh
kiwicode=`oathtool --totp -b ABC123ABC123ABCD`
echo $kiwicode | xclip #copies to the clipboard
..Set executable permissions.. ect
 
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Basil II

le putin machine
kiwifarms.net
tfw im just trying to install PCSX-R and the fucking controller configuration doesn't work because some autist fucked up his code so now I have to dig into files from an old repository that I have no idea how to find just to play my goddamn PS1 games.
 

tehpope

Archivist
True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
Manjaro is a rolling release distro that will have a lot of updates often and may/likely break shit. I've also seen these distros referred to as bleeding edge. I wouldn't recommend it unless you feel like troubleshooting shit a lot.
Mint is a point release distro. Set version numbers and less likely to push out updates that break shit.
When you install Manjaro, it does have you on the stable branch for packages by default. Unless you are using software from an unofficial software repo, updates get pushed out like 1-2 a month. The testing/unstable userbase test the packages out before being pushed to everyone. You can switch to Testing or Unstable. Unstable is basically like Arch but a few days behind. Testing is a bit behind of Unstable. But those branches get updates all the time.

And with a point release distro, you have to update the entire OS every few years or so. Rolling release only has one install ever. If you never do updates and suddenly want to update, all you have to do is run the package manager.
 

Sam Losco

True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
When you install Manjaro, it does have you on the stable branch for packages by default. Unless you are using software from an unofficial software repo, updates get pushed out like 1-2 a month. The testing/unstable userbase test the packages out before being pushed to everyone. You can switch to Testing or Unstable. Unstable is basically like Arch but a few days behind. Testing is a bit behind of Unstable. But those branches get updates all the time.

And with a point release distro, you have to update the entire OS every few years or so. Rolling release only has one install ever. If you never do updates and suddenly want to update, all you have to do is run the package manger.
I don't remember selecting between a stable/unstable when I tried Manjaro, I just remember there were many package updates constantly. I could run all the updates and then a couple hours later have more.

"Updating the entire OS" really isn't a big deal. I've upgraded Mint in place every release since I started using it in 17.x using their procedures and it's been fine every time. Just type in a a bit and let it do it's thing. The most annoying thing is them trying to force using Timeshift for backups. Adds an extra step in upgrading to tell it to ignore that.
 
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tehpope

Archivist
True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
I don't remember selecting between a stable/unstable when I tried Manjaro, I just remember there were many package updates constantly. I could run all the updates and then a couple hours later have more.

"Updating the entire OS" really isn't a big deal. I've upgraded Mint in place every release since I started using it in 17.x using their procedures and it's been fine every time. Just type in a a bit and let it do it's thing. The most annoying thing is them trying to force using Timeshift for backups. Adds an extra step in upgrading to tell it to ignore that.
There isn't an option in the GUI installer. Not sure if there is if you use the terminal one. After the install, you have to tell Pacman to switch the branches and update your mirrors.

https://wiki.manjaro.org/index.php?title=Switching_Branches

I'm not saying there's anything wrong or buggy with updating your OS ever few years. Its just that some people might be too lazy to do the update.
 
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Basil II

le putin machine
kiwifarms.net
redpill me on Gentoo, what's the point of having everything be faster when running it when the time saved is just gonna be taken again by compiling everything?
 

Vecr

"nanoposts with 90° spatial rotational symmetries"
kiwifarms.net
redpill me on Gentoo, what's the point of having everything be faster when running it when the time saved is just gonna be taken again by compiling everything?
I don't really think there is one in most cases. In my opinion, Arch Linux is better because if you want to compile a package to run on your CPU better, you can, but you don't have to for everything. For example, if you had a package that spent a lot of time switching between functions and you had a Skylake or Zen CPU, you could re-compile it with the PKGBUILD and native march flags.
 
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3119967d0c

"a brain" - @REGENDarySumanai
True & Honest Fan
kiwifarms.net
redpill me on Gentoo, what's the point of having everything be faster when running it when the time saved is just gonna be taken again by compiling everything?
When I used it a decade ago or so, it was a great way to learn how everything fit together.

I understand that it still offers a choice of init systems, which is nice if you turn your computer all the way off often- openrc used to be the default, and if still usable it's a great system. Gives all the supposed increase startup speed of systemd, without the Kaposi's sarcoma. That said there are other distributions like Devuan that still offer functional init systems too.
 

cecograph

kiwifarms.net
I know, I'm just questioning the actual reason behind why someone would use it.

I guess that's good a reason as any.
A lot of Linux software, being open source, is published with a metric fuck ton of configuration options that are applied at compile-time, and which typically affect the software's dependencies. Binary-based distros select these configurations upstream and therefore the dependencies for you. If you want any choice here, the package maintainers normally have to maintain separate packages (for example, it's typical for emacs to be shipped as a "-nox" version if you only intend to use it on, say, a headless server).

A selling point of a source-based distribution is to give the user access to this compile time configuration, and therefore more control over the dependencies and what libraries end up on their system. Gentoo gives you a lot of customisation here. If you want to run it on a server or some shitty device, you can really pare it down, or you can harden it by removing potentially vulnerable dependencies on your software and shrinking its attack surface. Or if you want to play on the bleeding edge, you can compile less battle-tested versions of the software. Compilation times suck, but you can set up Gentoo to cross-compile from a build server, or just some faster machines you have spare.

Gentoo takes this philosophy to the kernel, whose configuration is described a bit in the installation docs. You don't have to configure the kernel yourself, but it's not uncommon for Gentoo users to do so.

I've always had a bit of an irrational minimalist ethic, so I liked how you could set flags in Gentoo to reduce your dependencies. I went years without having GTK anywhere on my system, just by setting up my USE flags to cull it (USE flags being the way that Gentoo exposes compile time configuration of userland packages).

I can't say much for the performance you get when you've compiled everything for your specific architecture. I never tried to benchmark it. And I think, on reflection, I'd have been happy to have more generic binaries compiled with my USE flags that I could have downloaded without compiling them locally.

I'm happier with NixOS. It's still effectively source-based. But it doesn't expose compile-time configuration through anything as coarse and brutish as USE flags. Instead, all package management is through a very elegant and turing complete (but side-effect free) programming language, where it's pretty easy for package maintainers to provide configuration and customisation hooks, and pretty easy for users to configure and customise. Customising a package is often as easy as adding a single "override" line in a central configuration file and reinstalling that package. Uncustomised packages are cached upstream, so you don't need to compile much.
 
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AmpleApricots

kiwifarms.net
I use runit on Gentoo. There wasn't really a useful default configuration for it (making it work with OpenRC like in gentoos default configuration is retarded and misses the point entirely) and with Gentoo you aren't really hard bound to any init system really, as long as you understand how gentoos package management and Linux userland software in general works. An init system (if implemented in a correct manner) is super simple stuff, as is service management. With runit you just have to write a script that brings the most important things of your system up (it's basically AUTOEXEC.BAT) and cleans up on shutdown. Then comes the services, but most services you should use are so well-behaved that you really don't need a complicated system to control them as they'll handle things like network connection loss etc. on their own. Logging is similarly trivial if implemented correctly.

I've been using gentoo for about 15 years now and compiling time these days on any just somewhat recent system are ignoreable if it's not browsers or libre office or such. You do have speed advantages in custom-compiled stuff here and there for some CPU architectures but they're usually negligible. (although they can amass to being somewhat noticeable) The most interesting thing about gentoos approach are USE flags and the ease how you can apply your own patches to local software, even semi-automatically with updates. That all being said, gentoo has it's problems too. Mostly questionable choices by package maintainers (who often have an overlap with your stereotypical forums janny) and bloat/careless configuration of packages. Luckily with gentoo it's trivial to override ebuilds with local modified versions or make entirely new ones from scratch, so another weak point -the arrogant idiocy of some package maintainers- can be another strong point in gentoo as portage allows you to override most if not all of their decisions and changes. I just wish it wasn't all based on python, which I find gross.
 

Slav Power

Serious politics
kiwifarms.net
I seem to really like Kubuntu, as it just works and KDE Plasma is a really nice interface IMO, but I was wondering if there's some other distro that just works out of the box, has a good UI, and can be used for more advanced tasks later on. Any suggestions?
 
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