The Linux Thread - The Autist's OS of Choice

I'm going straight windows with a WSL. F# + Powershell 5 + x64 + PostgreSQL with the MSN user account extensibility blows to shit any linux distro I've seen. Hands down, if you can't use powershell then you dont understand just how far ahead they are. Using simple Java Injection into XML data, you can literally send a complex pay load for chump change as the invocations happen outside the scope of the RPC message sender.
F# is the best language I've used on a managed runtime, and I really want to try Powershell. Do you know if they're any fun to use on Linux with .NET Core?

I always found gentoo to be complete overkill and I hate emerge - it's so slow (not talking about compile times - just calculating dependencies and shit takes forever on a weak machine).
The few packages I need to customize the configure flags for, I just compile myself.
How do you keep up with security updates? How do you track down their dependencies? If uninstalling another package purges one of those dependencies, how do you spot the breakage?

It's also not just about need. Most packages have a ton of configuration, and if you had the choice, you may well find you'd prefer if your packages where configured in standard ways by default. That's what global use flags give you.
 
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Saigon63

Tossin the Shaka’s on the way out
F# is the best language I've used on a managed runtime, and I really want to try Powershell. Do you know if they're any fun to use on Linux with .NET Core?

How do you keep up with security updates? How do you track down their dependencies? If uninstalling another package purges one of those dependencies, how do you spot the breakage?

It's also not just about need. Most packages have a ton of configuration, and if you had the choice, you may well find you'd prefer if your packages where configured in standard ways by default. That's what global use flags give you.
I am almost 100% certain. ARM is adopting x86 for realz and even the cryptos and intel are adopting the x86-64 instructions.
Made my day bro, I don’t usually get to talk to people on your level. As far as package management, as far as I can tell it’s still some I get like shit so references need to get handled carefully.

Btw- I randomly download Elixir and was looking at jumping into that too.

Lastly, it has absolutely blown my mind that all these people are python sick riders for AI, But F# + PS + VBS + x86 with MS User accounts is very where.

vb is emxtemely useful.
Open F# https://fsharp.org/
It might not get a big following, but but I is gonna be important
 
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I wonder what will become of Fedora, now that CentOS Stream will fulfill essentially the same purpose.

lol seems to be getting a good reaction
centos.JPG
 
Used PV to measure file copy speed but unsure how accurate the results are.
View attachment 1781474
Disk benchmarking is a pain, because all the obvious and easy to access metrics only show how fast the filesystem is. Even a 5400 RPM disk will look like it's moving data at several GB/s when the whole transaction is cached in RAM.
Funtip: Try moving a file containing only zeros to see some really insane speeds.
 

Rozzy

A UwU Shiba Inu
Disk benchmarking is a pain, because all the obvious and easy to access metrics only show how fast the filesystem is. Even a 5400 RPM disk will look like it's moving data at several GB/s when the whole transaction is cached in RAM.
Funtip: Try moving a file containing only zeros to see some really insane speeds.
This is with a 6GB zeros file.
pv.png
 

e-gf

It's gay af for a man to take a nap
I switched from windows 10 to ubuntu, then to xubuntu. Works well for me so far and Xfce is a nice balance between customizable and user friendly. I am still learning to navigate the terminal and try other distros once I feel more comfortable. One frustrating thing is I think ubuntu has a more strict approach to accepting software in their repository, and then installation becomes more hassle than it's worth.
 

Never Scored

True & Honest Fan
I switched from windows 10 to ubuntu, then to xubuntu. Works well for me so far and Xfce is a nice balance between customizable and user friendly. I am still learning to navigate the terminal and try other distros once I feel more comfortable. One frustrating thing is I think ubuntu has a more strict approach to accepting software in their repository, and then installation becomes more hassle than it's worth.
Make sure to turn on access to all the software in settings. There's a few extra repositories there, a user one I think and a partner one? It's been a while.
 

fag0t

True & Honest Fan
Make sure to turn on access to all the software in settings. There's a few extra repositories there, a user one I think and a partner one? It's been a while.
xubuntu comes with those enabled by default

actually no im wrong theres one that doesnt come by default the canonical partners repo im not sure whats in it honestly
 
Most ridiculous problem I've solved in a while and I feel like puking it out somewhere.

I have an 2 TB NVMe drive in my new workstation (blazingly fast, SATA SSD is like an USB stick in comparsion) I am quite happy with. Even though I had my doubts regarding complexity I formatted the drive to btrfs mainly because of checksumming and snapshots and the wish of trying something new, being aware that btrfs is quite controversial and has it's problems. (that's what backups are for and yes I'm aware of zfs but I just couldn't be arsed with something outside the kernel tree) Copied my old system from my old SSD over to this drive, configured a new kernel for my new computer, enjoyed both files and programs opening instantly, no trouble.

Now I noticed a bizarre problem I couldn't reliably reproduce - scrubbing the filesystem would sometimes find a massive amount of corruption errors with tons of files not lining up with the stored checksum. Comparing the files with my backups would then show me that the files were identical, so no actual corruption. Curiously, rebooting the system would also fix the errors and let a few scrubbings come up clean until later ones would find a massive amount of errors again. Sometimes it was also completly random. Two scrubbings clean, one with massive amount of errors (>250.000), next one clean again. Curious. RAM wasn't the problem. (I also have [working] ECC RAM) A hardware problem with the drive was possible but health reports didn't show any problem, even the temperature was fine. It was baffling and after reading some horror stories online I was inclined to blame btrfs and it's tools itself since no files were actually damaged although that theory didn't sit well with me. Such a basic problem would've been noticed earlier and not by me first. There had to be something else at work here.

Even though the drive, according to temperature sensor, topped out at 40-47C when operating on full tilt (like during a scrub) and although the controller of the drive should slow things down when the drive is overheating, I started wondering and pointed a fan at the drive's heatsink. And indeed, the problems with the random corruption disappeared. I could run dozens of scrubs with no errors. Long story short - the heatsink was not properly attached to all ICs of the drive. Two of the four Flash ICs had barely any contact to it. The controller chip (which probably also contains the temperature sensor) did and so could neither register nor act on things getting too hot for some of the flash memory. The fan directly blowing on the drive cooled things down so far it didn't matter and in normal operation, the drive never got hot enough to become unreliable, only when doing large operations with lots of activity, like scrubbing the filesystem for a prolonged period of time. Rebooting the computer or pauses between scrubs allowed things to cool down somewhat, nothing else. With a filesystem like ext4 I would've never noticed this and would've just had an nvme drive that's unreliable under specific circumstances and suffered possible, completely random data corruption. It's always fun solving problems.
 
I was using Manjaro with XFCE until I replaced it with GNOME. I just really like the fact you can switch between mulitple windows in an instant by pressing the Windows-labeled key on your keyboard. But hey, that's just me.
 

Jolyne THICCujoh

On my way to clap some priest cheeks
Don't give up, you're 10% through already!

But seriously, what was the issue?
To be honest, I'm not a really sure. I know 100% that every time I made an install I did it pers instructions but something would always be wrong when I booted it up. I think for the most part it was my impatience that made me rage quit lol.
 
To be honest, I'm not a really sure. I know 100% that every time I made an install I did it pers instructions but something would always be wrong when I booted it up. I think for the most part it was my impatience that made me rage quit lol.
If you're impatient (as a personality type), don't bother. If you were just in a hurry, give it another try when you feel like you can "waste" some time on it. Dicking around with gentoo - especially when you break something and have to understand the problem and manually fix it instead of lol-reinstall ubuntu methodology - grants priceless experience and understanding of linux and OSes in general.
 

NumberingYourState

REAL MEN Fuck Up
True & Honest Fan
I flashed TwisterOS on my 512GB MicroSD for use on a Raspberry Pi 400 that I'm going to get tomorrow. I'm not that experienced with Linux and this looks like a good starter kit distro.
 

Never Scored

True & Honest Fan
I flashed TwisterOS on my 512GB MicroSD for use on a Raspberry Pi 400 that I'm going to get tomorrow. I'm not that experienced with Linux and this looks like a good starter kit distro.

It may not work if there's no image especially for the 400. I tried Ubuntu on my 400 at first and I found it very slow and clunky. So I tried the Raspberry Pi 4 version of Ubuntu Mate and it wouldn't boot at all. That being said, I would wager Twister is based on Raspberry Pi OS given that it's 32-bit only so it may install without a hitch.

I ended up flashing Raspberry Pi OS Lite and installing Mate and a login manager on top of it. If Twister doesn't work for you I'd be happy to post all the terminal commands you need to enter in order to help you out. Just let me know. It's not that complicated. The upside to this is you end up with a much faster and usable system, I started using it for most of my casual web browsing. The downside is you have to manually install everything and you have to uninstall some packages that come with Pi OS Lite to get wifi and bluetooth working.

Manjaro ARM booted on my Pi 400, but did not support dual monitors when I tried it, so it may not be a viable alternative. It is also very buggy.

If Twister doesn't work and you don't want to fuck around with command line, Raspberry Pi OS with desktop is probably your best bet.

I also highly recommend that you overclock your 400 to at least 2.0 ghz, because it has this big ass heat sink anyway. I have mine overclocked to 2.2 and it doesn't even get warm.
 
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